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Broadside (music)
A broadside (also known as a broadsheet) is a single sheet of inexpensive paper printed on one side, often with a ballad, rhyme, news and sometimes with woodcut illustrations. They were one of the most common forms of printed material between the sixteenth and nineteenth centuries, particularly in Britain, Ireland and North America and are often associated with one of the most important forms of traditional music from these countries, the ballad.Contents1 Development of broadsides 2 The nature of broadsides 3 Broadside ballads 4 See also 5 Notes 6 Further reading 7 External linksDevelopment of broadsides[edit] Ballads developed out of minstrelsy from the fourteenth and fifteenth century.[1]These were narrative poems that had combined with French courtly romances and Germanic legends that were popular at the King’s court, as well as in the halls of lords of the realm.[2] By the seventeenth century, minstrelsy had evolved into ballads whose authors wrote on a variety of topics
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The Broadside Ballads
The Broadside Ballads
The Broadside Ballads
(2011) is an album from The Baseball Project, bringing together songs that were recorded as ‘real time’ commentary on the 2010 baseball season for ESPN.com
ESPN.com
with unreleas
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Svend Grundtvig
Svend Hersleb Grundtvig (9 September 1824, Copenhagen
Copenhagen
– 14 July 1883, Frederiksberg) was a Danish literary historian and ethnographer. He was one of the first systematic collectors of Danish traditional music, and he was especially interested in Danish folk songs. He began the large project of editing Danish ballads. He also co-edited Icelandic ballads. He was the son of N. F. S. Grundtvig.Contents1 Biography 2 Own works 3 References 4 Literature 5 External linksBiography[edit] His father arranged his education, employing a series of home tutors to teach him Icelandic, Latin, Danish and Anglo-Saxon while personally instructing him in Nordic mythology, Saxo Grammaticus
Saxo Grammaticus
and folkloric ballads
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Robert Burns
Robert Burns
Robert Burns
(25 January 1759 – 21 July 1796), also known as Rabbie Burns, the Bard of Ayrshire, Ploughman Poet and various other names and epithets,[nb 1] was a Scottish poet and lyricist. He is widely regarded as the national poet of Scotland and is celebrated worldwide. He is the best known of the poets who have written in the Scots language, although much of his writing is also in English and a light Scots dialect, accessible to an audience beyond Scotland. He also wrote in standard English, and in these writings his political or civil commentary is often at its bluntest. He is regarded as a pioneer of the Romantic movement, and after his death he became a great source of inspiration to the founders of both liberalism and socialism, and a cultural icon in Scotland and among the Scottish diaspora
Scottish diaspora
around the world
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Walter Scott
Sir Walter Scott, 1st Baronet, FRSE (15 August 1771 – 21 September 1832) was a Scottish historical novelist, playwright, poet and historian. Many of his works remain classics of both English-language literature and of Scottish literature
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The Minstrelsy Of The Scottish Border
The Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border
The Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border
is a collection of Border ballads compiled by Walter Scott, first published in three volumes in 1802 and 1803, followed by volume IV in 1807
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Tom Paxton
Thomas Richard Paxton (born October 31, 1937) is an American folk singer-songwriter who has had a music career spanning more than fifty years.[1] In 2009, Paxton received a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award.[2][3] He is noteworthy as a music educator as well as an advocate for folk singers to combine traditional songs with new compositions. Paxton's songs have been widely covered, including modern standards such as "The Last Thing on My Mind", "Bottle of Wine", "Whose Garden Was This", "The Marvelous Toy", and "Ramblin' Boy". Paxton's songs have been recorded by Pete Seeger, Bob Dylan, The Weavers, Judy Collins, Sandy Denny, Joan Baez, Doc Watson, Harry Belafonte, Peter, Paul and Mary, The Seekers, Marianne Faithfull, The Kingston Trio, the Chad Mitchell Trio, John Denver, Dolly Parton
Dolly Parton
and Porter Wagoner, Willie Nelson, Flatt & Scruggs, The Move, The Fireballs, and many others (see covers)
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Leonard Cohen
Leonard Norman Cohen CC GOQ (September 21, 1934 – November 7, 2016) was a Canadian singer-songwriter, poet and novelist. His work explored religion, politics, isolation, sexuality, and personal relationships.[2] Cohen was inducted into the Canadian Music Hall of Fame, the Canadian Songwriters Hall of Fame, and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. He was a Companion of the Order of Canada, the nation's highest civilian honour. In 2011, Cohen received one of the Prince of Asturias Awards for literature and the ninth Glenn Gould Prize. Cohen pursued a career as a poet and novelist during the 1950s and early 1960s; he did not launch a music career until 1967, at the age of 33
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Phil Ochs
Philip David Ochs (/ˈoʊks/; December 19, 1940 – April 9, 1976) was an American protest singer (or, as he preferred, a topical singer) and songwriter who was known for his sharp wit, sardonic humor, earnest humanism, political activism, insightful and alliterative lyrics, and distinctive voice. He wrote hundreds of songs in the 1960s and 1970s and released eight albums. Ochs performed at many political events during the 1960s counterculture era, including anti-Vietnam War
War
and civil rights rallies, student events, and organized labor events over the course of his career, in addition to many concert appearances at such venues as New York City's Town Hall and Carnegie Hall
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Francis James Child
Francis James Child
Francis James Child
(February 1, 1825 – September 11, 1896) was an American scholar, educator, and folklorist, best known today for his collection of English and Scottish ballads now known as the Child Ballads. Child was Boylston professor of rhetoric and oratory at Harvard University, where he produced influential editions of English poetry. In 1876 he was named Harvard's first Professor of English, a position which allowed him to focus on academic research. It was during this time that he began work on the Child Ballads. The Child Ballads
Ballads
were published in five volumes between 1882 and 1898
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Thomas D'Urfey
Thomas D'Urfey (a.k.a. Tom Durfey; 1653 – 26 February 1723) was an English writer and wit. He composed plays, songs, and poetry, in addition to writing jokes. He was an important innovator and contributor in the evolution of the Ballad
Ballad
opera.Contents1 Life 2 Death 3 Quotes 4 References 5 External linksLife[edit]This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (August 2017) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)D'Urfey was born in Devonshire and began his professional life as a scrivener, but quickly turned to the theatre
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Peter Gammond
Peter Gammond
Peter Gammond
(born 30 September 1925) is a British music critic, writer, journalist, musician, poet, and artist.Peter Gammond[1] Peter Gammond
Peter Gammond
was born in Winnington, Northwich, Cheshire.[2] The son of John Thomas Gammond (1892-1970), a clerk, and Margaret Heald (1898-1985), Gammond inherited his musical interests from his father, who was a skilful and well-known amateur cellist and instrument repairer. After early preparatory school in Weaverham, where he lived from 1930 to 1950, he was educated at Sir John Deane's Grammar School, where he attained distinctions in English and Art in the Higher School Certificate examinations
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Cromwell's Panegyrick
Cromwell's Panegyrick is an English broadside ballad composed in the year 1647 and is currently housed in the British Library, Society of Antiquaries, The National Archives, Huntington Library, and the National Library of Scotland.[1] Online facsimiles of the ballad are available online for public consumption.[2] Though the ballad's title claims to be a panegyric-a poem praising Cromwell
Cromwell
for his military and political accomplishments-it quickly becomes a mock-panegyric, taking the theme of praise and turning it on its head. In this way, the ballad becomes more of a satire as opposed to a true panegyric
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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