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Broadcom
Broadcom Corporation
Broadcom Corporation
was an American fabless semiconductor company that made products for the wireless and broadband communication industry
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Ethernet
Ethernet
Ethernet
/ˈiːθərnɛt/ is a family of computer networking technologies commonly used in local area networks (LAN), metropolitan area networks (MAN) and wide area networks (WAN).[1] It was commercially introduced in 1980 and first standardized in 1983 as IEEE 802.3,[2] and has since been refined to support higher bit rates and longer link distances. Over time, Ethernet
Ethernet
has largely replaced competing wired LAN technologies such as Token Ring, FDDI and ARCNET. The original 10BASE5
10BASE5
Ethernet
Ethernet
uses coaxial cable as a shared medium, while the newer Ethernet
Ethernet
variants use twisted pair and fiber optic links in conjunction with hubs or switches
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ZigBee
Zigbee
Zigbee
is an IEEE 802.15.4-based specification for a suite of high-level communication protocols used to create personal area networks with small, low-power digital radios, such as for home automation, medical device data collection, and other low-power low-bandwidth needs, designed for small scale projects which need wireless connection. Hence, Zigbee
Zigbee
is a low-power, low data rate, and close proximity (i.e., personal area) wireless ad hoc network. The technology defined by the Zigbee
Zigbee
specification is intended to be simpler and less expensive than other wireless personal area networks (WPANs), such as Bluetooth
Bluetooth
or more general wireless networking such as Wi-Fi
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VOIP
Voice over Internet Protocol
Internet Protocol
(also voice over IP, VoIP or IP telephony) is a methodology and group of technologies for the delivery of voice communications and multimedia sessions over Internet
Internet
Protocol (IP) networks, such as the Internet. The terms Internet
Internet
telephony, broadband telephony, and broadband phone service specifically refer to the provisioning of communications services (voice, fax, SMS, voice-messaging) over the public Internet, rather than via the public switched telephone network (PSTN). The steps and principles involved in originating VoIP telephone calls are similar to traditional digital telephony and involve signaling, channel setup, digitization of the analog voice signals, and encoding. Instead of being transmitted over a circuit-switched network, the digital information is packetized, and transmission occurs as IP packets over a packet-switched network
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University Of California, Irvine
The University
University
of California, Irvine (UCI, UC Irvine, or Irvine), is a public research university located in Irvine, Orange County, California, United States, and one of the 10 campuses in the University of California
University of California
(UC) system. UC Irvine offers 80 undergraduate degrees and 98 graduate and professional degrees
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Westwood, Los Angeles
Westwood is a commercial and residential neighborhood in the northern central portion of the Westside region of Los Angeles, California. It is the home of the University of California, Los Angeles
University of California, Los Angeles
(UCLA). The 2000 census found the forty-seven thousand people living in the neighborhood were generally young and moderately diverse ethnically, with a generally high level of income and education. The neighborhood was developed after 1919, with a new campus of the University of California opened in 1926. Other attractions besides the UCLA
UCLA
campus include Westwood Village, with its historic motion picture theaters, restaurants and shopping, Westwood Village Memorial Park Cemetery and the Hammer Museum. Holmby Hills is considered one of the wealthiest residential areas in Los Angeles, and the Geffen Playhouse attracts theater-goers
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Public Company
A public company, publicly traded company, publicly held company, publicly listed company, or public corporation is a corporation whose ownership is dispersed among the general public in many shares of stock which are freely traded on a stock exchange or in over the counter markets. In some jurisdictions, public companies over a certain size must be listed on an exchange
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NASDAQ
The Nasdaq Stock
Stock
Market (/ˈnæzˌdæk/ ( listen)) is an American stock exchange
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Gartner
Gartner, Inc. is an American research and advisory firm providing information technology related insight for IT and other business leaders located across the world. Its headquarters are in Stamford, Connecticut, United States. It was known as Gartner
Gartner
Group, Inc until 2000, when it was then changed to Gartner.[6] Research
Research
provided by Gartner
Gartner
targets CIOs, senior IT, marketing and supply chain leaders. Gartner
Gartner
clients include large corporations, government agencies, technology companies and the investment community. The company consists of Research, Executive Programs, Consulting and Events
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Fortune 500
The Fortune 500
Fortune 500
is an annual list compiled and published by Fortune magazine that ranks 500 of the largest United States
United States
corporations by total revenue for their respective fiscal years.[2] The list includes publicly held companies, along with privately held companies for which revenues are publicly available. The concept of the Fortune 500
Fortune 500
was created by Edgar P. Smith, a Fortune editor, and the first list was published in 1955.[3][4] The Fortune 500
Fortune 500
is more commonly used than its subset Fortune 100 or wider list Fortune 1000.[5]Contents1 Methodology 2 History 3 Fortune 500
Fortune 500
lists 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksMethodology[edit] The original Fortune 500
Fortune 500
was limited to companies whose revenues were derived from manufacturing, mining, and energy exploration
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Internet Of Things
The Internet
Internet
of Things (IoT) is the network of physical devices, vehicles, home appliances and other items embedded with electronics, software, sensors, actuators, and connectivity which enables these objects to connect and exchange data.[1][2][3] Each thing is uniquely identifiable through its embedded computing system but is able to inter-operate within the existing Internet
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System-on-a-chip
A system on a chip or system on chip (SoC or SOC) is an integrated circuit (also known as an "IC" or "chip") that integrates all components of a computer or other electronic systems. It may contain digital, analog, mixed-signal, and often radio-frequency functions – all on a single substrate. SoCs are very common in the mobile computing market because of their low power consumption.[1] A typical application is in the area of embedded systems. SoC integrates a microcontroller (or microprocessor) with advanced peripherals like graphics processing unit (GPU), Wi-Fi
Wi-Fi
module, or coprocessor. If the definition of a microcontroller is a system that integrates a microprocessor with peripheral circuits and memory, the SoC is to a microcontroller what a microcontroller is to processors, remembering that the SoC does not necessarily contain built-in memory. In general, there are three distinguishable types of SoCs
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Server Farm
A server farm or server cluster is a collection of computer servers - usually maintained by an organization to supply server functionality far beyond the capability of a single machine. Server farms often consist of thousands of computers which require a large amount of power to run and to keep cool. At the optimum performance level, a server farm has enormous costs (both financial and environmental) associated with it.[1] Server farms often have backup servers, which can take over the function of primary servers in the event of a primary-server failure. Server farms are typically collocated with the network switches and/or routers which enable communication between the different parts of the cluster and the users of the cluster
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San Diego
San Diego
San Diego
(/ˌsæn diˈeɪɡoʊ/; Spanish for 'Saint Didacus'; Spanish: [san ˈdjeɣo]) is a major city in California, United States. It is in San Diego
San Diego
County, on the coast of the Pacific Ocean in Southern California, approximately 120 miles (190 km) south of Los Angeles
Los Angeles
and immediately adjacent to the border with Mexico. With an estimated population of 1,406,630 as of July 1, 2016,[9] San Diego is the eighth-largest city in the United States
United States
and second-largest in California
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U.S. International Trade Commission
The United States
United States
International Trade Commission (USITC, sometimes I.T.C.[3]) is an independent, bipartisan, quasi-judicial, federal agency of the United States
United States
that provides trade expertise to both the legislative and executive branches. Furthermore, the agency determines[4] the impact of imports on U.S. industries and directs actions against unfair trade practices, such as subsidies, dumping, patent, trademark, and copyright infringement.Contents1 Background and statutory authority 2 Mission 3 Commissioners 4 Hearings 5 History 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksBackground and statutory authority[edit] The USITC was established by the U.S. Congress
U.S. Congress
on September 8, 1916, as the U.S. Tariff Commission.[5] In 1974, the name was changed to the U.S
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Stock Option
In finance, an option is a contract which gives the buyer (the owner or holder of the option) the right, but not the obligation, to buy or sell an underlying asset or instrument at a specified strike price on a specified date, depending on the form of the option. The strike price may be set by reference to the spot price (market price) of the underlying security or commodity on the day an option is taken out, or it may be fixed at a discount or at a premium. The seller has the corresponding obligation to fulfill the transaction – to sell or buy – if the buyer (owner) "exercises" the option. An option that conveys to the owner the right to buy at a specific price is referred to as a call; an option that conveys the right of the owner to sell at a specific price is referred to as a put
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