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Broadcast Television
Terrestrial television
Terrestrial television
or broadcast television is a type of television broadcasting in which the television signal is transmitted by radio waves from the terrestrial (Earth based) transmitter of a television station to a TV receiver having an antenna. The term is more common in Europe, while in North America
North America
it is referred to as broadcast television or sometimes over-the-air television (OTA)
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Air (visual Novel)
Air is a Japanese adult visual novel developed by Key released on September 8, 2000 for Windows PCs. Key later released versions of Air without the erotic content, and the game was ported to the Dreamcast, PlayStation 2, PlayStation Portable
PlayStation Portable
and PlayStation Vita. The story follows the life of Yukito Kunisaki, a traveling showman searching for the "girl in the sky". He arrives in a quiet, seaside town where he meets three girls, one of whom is the key to the end of his journey. The gameplay in Air follows a branching plot line which offers pre-determined scenarios with courses of interaction, and focuses on the appeal of the three female main characters by the player character. The game is divided into three segments—Dream, Summer, and Air—which serve as different phases in the overall story. The title of the game reflects the prominent themes of the air, skies, and use of wings throughout gameplay
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ATSC Standard
Advanced Television Systems Committee
Advanced Television Systems Committee
(ATSC) standards are a set of standards for digital television transmission over terrestrial, cable, and satellite networks. It is largely a replacement for the analog NTSC
NTSC
standard, and like that standard, used mostly in the United States, Mexico
Mexico
and Canada. Other former users of NTSC, like Japan, have not used ATSC
ATSC
during their digital television transition. The ATSC
ATSC
standards were developed in the early 1990s by the Grand Alliance, a consortium of electronics and telecommunications companies that assembled to develop a specification for what is now known as HDTV. The standard is now administered by the Advanced Television Systems Committee. The standard includes a number of patented elements, and licensing is required for devices that use these parts of the standard
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Fringe Reception
A broadcast range (also listening range or listening area for radio, or viewing range or viewing area for television) is the service area that a broadcast station or other transmission covers via radio waves (or possibly infrared light, which is closely related). It is generally the area in which a station's signal strength is sufficient for most receivers to decode it. However, this also depends on interference from other stations.Contents1 Legal definitions 2 Practical application 3 Edge-of-range issues 4 Digital versus analogLegal definitions[edit] The "primary service area" is the area served by a station's strongest signal. The "city-grade contour" is 70 dBµ (decibels relative to one microvolt per meter of signal strength) or 3.16mV/m (millivolts per meter) for FM stations in the United States, according to Federal Communications Commission (FCC) regulations
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BBC Two
BBC
BBC
Two is the second flagship television channel of the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) in the United Kingdom, Isle of Man
Isle of Man
and Channel Islands. It covers a wide range of subject matter, but tending towards more "highbrow" programmes than the more mainstream and popular BBC
BBC
One. Like the BBC's other domestic TV and radio channels, it is funded by the television licence, and is therefore free of commercial advertising. It is a comparatively well-funded public-service network, regularly attaining a much higher audience share than most public-service networks worldwide. Originally styled BBC2, it was the third British television station to be launched (starting on 21 April 1964), and from 1 July 1967, Europe's first television channel to broadcast regularly in colour
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405-line
The 405-line
405-line
monochrome analogue television broadcasting system was the first fully electronic television system to be used in regular broadcasting. It was introduced with the BBC
BBC
Television
Television
Service in 1936, suspended for the duration of World War II, and remained in operation in the UK until 1985. It was also used between 1961 and 1982 in Ireland, as well as from 1957 to 1973 for the Rediffusion Television cable service in Hong Kong. Sometimes called the Marconi- EMI
EMI
system, it was developed in 1934 by the EMI
EMI
Research Team led by Sir Isaac Shoenberg. The figure of 405 lines had been chosen following discussions over Sunday lunch at the home of Alan Blumlein.[1] The system used interlacing; EMI
EMI
had been experimenting with a 243-line all-electronic interlaced system since 1933
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PAL
Phase Alternating Line (PAL) is a colour encoding system for analogue television used in broadcast television systems in most countries broadcasting at 625-line / 50 field (25 frame) per second (576i). Other common colour encoding systems are NTSC
NTSC
and SECAM. All the countries using PAL
PAL
are currently in process of conversion or have already converted standards to DVB, ISDB
ISDB
or DTMB. This page primarily discusses the PAL
PAL
colour encoding system. The articles on broadcast television systems and analogue television further describe frame rates, image resolution and audio modulation.Contents1 History 2 Colour encoding2.1 PAL
PAL
vs. NTSC 2.2 PAL
PAL
vs
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VHF
Very high frequency
Very high frequency
(VHF) is the ITU designation[1] for the range of radio frequency electromagnetic waves (radio waves) from 30 to 300 megahertz (MHz), with corresponding wavelengths of ten to one meter. Frequencies immediately below VHF are denoted high frequency (HF), and the next higher frequencies are known as ultra high frequency (UHF). Common uses for VHF are FM radio
FM radio
broadcasting, television broadcasting, two way land mobile radio systems (emergency, business, private use and military), long range data communication up to several tens of kilometers with radio modems, amateur radio, and marine communications. Air traffic control
Air traffic control
communications and air navigation systems (e.g
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NTSC
NTSC, named after the National Television System Committee,[1] is the analog television system that is used in North America, and until digital conversion was used in most of the Americas
Americas
(except Brazil, Argentina, Paraguay, Uruguay, and French Guiana); Myanmar; South Korea; Taiwan; Philippines, Japan;[2] and some Pacific island nations and territories (see map). The first NTSC
NTSC
standard was developed in 1941 and had no provision for color. In 1953 a second NTSC
NTSC
standard was adopted, which allowed for color television broadcasting which was compatible with the existing stock of black-and-white receivers
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National Television System Committee
NTSC, named after the National Television System Committee,[1] is the analog television system that is used in North America, and until digital conversion was used in most of the Americas (except Brazil, Argentina, Paraguay, Uruguay, and French Guiana); Myanmar; South Korea; Taiwan; Philippines, Japan;[2] and some Pacific island nations and territories (see map). The first NTSC standard was developed in 1941 and had no provision for color. In 1953 a second NTSC standard was adopted, which allowed for color television broadcasting which was compatible with the existing stock of black-and-white receivers
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Digital Television Transition
The digital television transition, also called the digital switchover, the analog switch-off (ASO), or the analog shutdown, is the process in which older analog television broadcasting is converted to and replaced by digital television. This primarily involves the conversion of analog terrestrial television to digital terrestrial. However, it also involves analog cable conversion to digital cable, as well as analog to digital satellite television. Begun by some countries around 2006, this is an involved process because the existing analog television receivers owned by viewers cannot receive digital broadcasts; viewers must either purchase new digital TVs, or converter boxes which change the digital signal to an analog signal which can be viewed on the old TV. In many countries, a simulcast service is operated where a broadcast is made available to viewers in both analog and digital at the same time
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Advanced Television Systems Committee
The Advanced Television Systems Committee (ATSC) is the group, established in 1982, that developed the eponymous ATSC standards for digital television in the United States. These standards have also been adopted by Canada, Mexico, South Korea and recently Honduras, and are being considered by other countries. See also[edit]ATSC tuner Broadcast flag CEA-708 Digital Video Broadcasting (DVB) - European digital television standard OpenCableExternal links[edit]Official website ATSC standards download pagev t eDigital television in North AmericaTerrestrialDigital broadcastingATSC tuners Digital subchannels Virtual channels Distributed transmission system DatacastingGuide Plus National Datacast UpdateLogicMetropolitan Television Alliance Grand AllianceDigital switchoverAll-Channel Receiver Act SAFER Act Digital channel election Set-top boxes Digital television adapter U.S
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Band I
Band I is a range of radio frequencies within the very high frequency (VHF) part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Band I ranges from 47 to 68 MHz
MHz
for the European Broadcasting
Broadcasting
Area,[1] and from 54 to 88 MHz for the Americas[2] and it is primarily used for television broadcasting in line to ITU Radio Regulations (article 1.38)
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HDTV
High-definition television (HDTV) is a television system providing an image resolution that is of substantially higher resolution than that of standard-definition television
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Ultra High Frequency
Ultra high frequency
Ultra high frequency
(UHF) is the ITU
ITU
designation for radio frequencies in the range between 300 megahertz (MHz) and 3 gigahertz (GHz), also known as the decimetre band as the wavelengths range from one meter to one decimeter. Radio
Radio
waves with frequencies above the UHF band fall into the SHF (super-high frequency) or microwave frequency range. Lower frequency signals fall into the VHF
VHF
(very high frequency) or lower bands. UHF radio waves propagate mainly by line of sight; they are blocked by hills and large buildings although the transmission through building walls is strong enough for indoor reception
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Band IV
Band IV is the name of a radio frequency range within the ultra high frequency part of the electromagnetic spectrum.[1][2][3][4][5] Sources differ on the exact frequency range of the band. For example, the Swiss Federal Office of Communications,[1] the Broadcast engineer's reference book[2] and Ericsson
Ericsson
India Ltd[3] all define the range of Band IV from 470 to 582 MHz
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