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Bro Gozh Ma Zadoù
Bro Gozh ma Zadoù (Breton: Old Land of My Fathers) is the anthem of Brittany, sometimes presented as the "national anthem"[1] although it has no official status. It is sung to the same tune as that of the national anthem of Wales, Hen Wlad Fy Nhadau, and has similar words. The Cornish anthem, Bro Goth Agan Tasow, is also sung to the same tune. This anthem is played during major sporting events, as here at the final of the Coupe de France
Coupe de France
between the Stade Rennais F.C.
Stade Rennais F.C.
and the En Avant de Guingamp The Breton lyrics are the creation of François Jaffrennou
François Jaffrennou
in 1897, and the music was that composed by James James, of Pontypridd, Wales, for Hen Wlad Fy Nhadau. The new song was first published in 1898, and circulated as Henvelidigez ("Adaptation")
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Brittany
Brittany
Brittany
(/ˈbrɪtəni/; French: Bretagne [bʁətaɲ] ( listen); Breton: Breizh, pronounced [bʁɛjs] or [bʁɛχ];[1] Gallo: Bertaèyn, pronounced [bəʁtaɛɲ]) is a cultural region in the northwest of France, covering the western part of what was known as Armorica
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La Marseillaise
"La Marseillaise" (French pronunciation: ​[la maʁsɛjɛːz]) is the national anthem of France. The song was written in 1792 by Claude Joseph Rouget de Lisle
Claude Joseph Rouget de Lisle
in Strasbourg
Strasbourg
after the declaration of war by France
France
against Austria, and was originally titled "Chant de guerre pour l'Armée du Rhin" ("War Song for the Rhine Army"). The Marseillaise was a revolutionary song, an anthem to freedom, a patriotic call to mobilize all the citizens and an exhortation to fight against tyranny and foreign invasion. The French National Convention adopted it as the Republic's anthem in 1795. It acquired its nickname after being sung in Paris by volunteers from Marseille marching to the capital. The song is the first example of the "European march" anthemic style
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My Belarusy
"My Belarusy"(Belarusian: Мы, беларусы (My, Bielarusy) Russian: Мы, беларусы (My, Bielarusy); "We Belarusians") is the unofficial title of the national anthem of Belarus
Belarus
and the first line of its lyrics. Officially, "My Belarusy" is titled "the State Anthem of the Republic of Belarus" (Belarusian: Дзяржаўны гімн Рэспублікі Беларусь, Russian: Государственный гимн Республики Беларусь). The anthem was originally written and adopted in 1955 for use in the Byelorussian Soviet Socialist Republic.[1] The music of the Byelorussian SSR
Byelorussian SSR
anthem was composed by Niescier Sakałoŭski and the lyrics were written by Mikhas Klimkovich. After the dissolution of the Soviet Union, the music composed by Sakałoŭski was kept and the lyrics were discarded
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La Brabançonne
The "La Brabançonne" (French: [la bʁabɑ̃sɔn], Dutch: De Brabançonne, German: Das Lied von Brabant) is the national anthem of Belgium
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National Anthem Of Bosnia And Herzegovina
"The National Anthem of Bosnia
Bosnia
and Herzegovina" (Bosnian, Croatian and Serbian: Državna himna Bosne i Hercegovine / Државна химна Босне и Херцеговине) is the name of the official national anthem of Bosnia
Bosnia
and Herzegovina. It is one of the three national anthems in the world (along with Spain
Spain
and San Marino) to have no official lyrics.[1]Contents1 History 2 Proposed lyrics 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] The national anthem was adopted on 25 June 1999, by the promulgation of the Law on the National Anthem of Bosnia
Bosnia
and Herzegovina,[2] replacing the previous anthem, "Jedna si jedina", which excluded the country's Serb and Croat communities, this despite the fact that the text does not mention any nationality
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Mila Rodino
Mila Rodino
Mila Rodino
(Мила Родино [miɫɐ rɔdino], translated as "Dear Motherland" or "Dear native land") is the national anthem of Bulgaria. It is based on the music and text of the song "Gorda Stara Planina" by Tsvetan Radoslavov, written and composed as he left to fight in the Serbo-Bulgarian War
Serbo-Bulgarian War
in 1885
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Hymn To Liberty
The "Hymn to Liberty" or "Hymn to Freedom"[1] (Greek: Ύμνος εις την Ελευθερίαν, Ýmnos is tin Eleftherían pronounced [ˈimnos is tin elefθeˈrian], also Greek: Υμνος προς την Ελευθερίαν[3][4][5] Ýmnos pros tin Eleftherían pronounced [ˈim.nos pros tin elefθe'ri.an]) is a poem written by Dionysios Solomos
Dionysios Solomos
in 1823 that consists of 158 stanzas, which is used as the national anthem of Greece
Greece
and Cyprus
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Kde Domov Můj
Kde domov můj
Kde domov můj
(Czech pronunciation: [ˈɡdɛ ˈdomof ˈmuːj]; English: Where my home is) is the national anthem of the Czech Republic, written by the composer František Škroup
František Škroup
and the playwright Josef Kajetán Tyl.[1] The piece was written as a part of the incidental music to the comedy Fidlovačka aneb Žádný hněv a žádná rvačka (Fidlovačka, or No Anger and No Brawl). It was first performed by Karel Strakatý
Karel Strakatý
at the Estates Theatre
Estates Theatre
in Prague
Prague
on 21 December 1834. The original song consists of two verses (see below). Although J. K
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Der Er Et Yndigt Land
"Der er et yndigt land" (Danish: [dæɐ̯ ˈæɐ̯ ed ˈøndid ˈlanˀ] or [dɑ (...)]), commonly translated into English as "There is a lovely country", is one of the national anthems of Denmark.Contents1 History 2 Music 3 Song lyrics3.1 Danish lyrics 3.2 Short version 3.3 Free metrical translation 3.4 Literal translation4 Original lyrics4.1 Original Danish lyrics 4.2 English Translation5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] The lyrics were written in 1819 by Adam Oehlenschläger
Adam Oehlenschläger
and bore the motto in Latin: Ille terrarum mihi praeter omnes angulus ridet (Horace: "This corner of the earth smiles for me more than any other"). The music was composed in 1835 by Hans Ernst Krøyer
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Mu Isamaa, Mu õnn Ja Rõõm
"Mu isamaa, mu õnn ja rõõm" (English: "My Fatherland, My Happiness and Joy"; Estonian pronunciation: [mu ˈisɑmɑː mu ˈɤnʲ jɑ ˈrɤːm]) is the national anthem of Estonia; it was adopted as the national anthem (Estonian: (riigi)hümn) in 1920. The lyrics were written by Johann Voldemar Jannsen
Johann Voldemar Jannsen
and are set to a melody composed in 1848 by Fredrik (Friedrich) Pacius which is also that of the national anthem of Finland: "Maamme" (Swedish: "Vårt Land").[1][better source needed] The only difference between the two anthems is the key signature they are in
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Maamme
"Maamme" (Finnish: [ˈmɑːmːe], "our land") or "Vårt land" (Swedish: [ˈvoːrt ˈland]) is the title of Finland's national anthem. The music was composed by the German immigrant Fredrik Pacius, with (original Swedish) words by Johan Ludvig Runeberg, and with this music it was performed for the first time on 13 May 1848.[1] Originally it was written for the 500th anniversary of Porvoo
Porvoo
and for that occasion it was Runeberg itself who wrote the music.[2] The poem has been influenced by the Szózat (Appeal) of Mihály Vörösmarty, both in style and content.[3] The original poem, written in 1846 but not printed until 1848, had 11 stanzas and formed the prologue to the verse cycle The Tales of Ensign Stål ("Fänrik Ståhls Sägner"), a classic example of Romantic nationalism
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Tavisupleba
"Tavisupleba" (Georgian: თავისუფლება, [tʰɑwisupʰlɛbɑ]) is the national anthem of Georgia. The song, whose title means "Freedom", was adopted as the Georgian national anthem in May 2004, along with the new national flag and coat of arms. The symbols' change was brought about upon the successful overthrow of the previous government in the bloodless Rose Revolution. The music, taken from the Georgian operas Abesalom da Eteri
Abesalom da Eteri
("Abesalom and Eteri") and Daisi ("The Nightfall"), by the Georgian composer Zachary (Zacharia) Paliashvili (Georgian: ზაქარია ფალიაშვილი, 1871–1933), was adapted to form the anthem by Ioseb Kechakmadze
Ioseb Kechakmadze
(Georgian: იოსებ კეჭაყმაძე)
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Land Der Berge, Land Am Strome
"Land der Berge, Land am Strome" (German pronunciation: [ˈlant dɐ ˈbɛɐ̯ˌgə ˈlant am ʃtrɔmə]; Land of mountains, land by the river [Danube]) is the national anthem of Austria. Nineteen days before his death on 5 December 1791, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart composed his last complete work, the Freimaurerkantate, K. 623. In parts of the printed edition of this cantata there appeared the song K. 623a "Lasst uns mit geschlungnen Händen" ("Let us with joined hands"). To this melody the Austrian national anthem is sung. Today, Mozart's authorship is regarded as dubious and the song is attributed to Johann Holzer (de) (1753–1818).[1] The lyrics were written by Paula von Preradović, one of the few women to have written lyrics for a national anthem.[2] On 22 October 1946, it was declared Austria's official national anthem
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Deutschlandlied
The "Deutschlandlied" (English: "Song of Germany", German pronunciation: [ˈdɔʏtʃlantˌliːt]; also known as "Das Lied der Deutschen", or "The Song of the Germans"), or part of it, has been the national anthem of Germany
Germany
since 1922, except in East Germany, whose anthem was "Auferstanden aus Ruinen" ("Risen from Ruins") from 1949 to 1990. Since World War II
World War II
and the fall of Nazi Germany, only the third stanza has been used as the national anthem
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