HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

British Medical Association
The BRITISH MEDICAL ASSOCIATION (BMA) is the professional association and registered trade union for doctors in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
. The association does not regulate or certify doctors, a responsibility which lies with the General Medical Council . The association’s headquarters are located in BMA House, Tavistock Square , London
London
. Additionally, the association has national offices in Cardiff
Cardiff
, Belfast
Belfast
, and Edinburgh
Edinburgh
, a European office in Brussels
Brussels
and a number of offices in English regions. The BMA has a range of representative and scientific committees and is recognised by National Health Service (NHS) employers as sole contract negotiators for doctors
[...More...]

"British Medical Association" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

English Poor Laws
The ENGLISH POOR LAWS were a system of poor relief which existed in England and Wales
England and Wales
that developed out of late-medieval and Tudor-era laws being codified in 1587–98. The Poor Law
Poor Law
system was in existence until the emergence of the modern welfare state after the Second World War. English Poor Law
Poor Law
legislation can be traced back as far as 1536, when legislation was passed to deal with the impotent poor , although there is much earlier Tudor legislation dealing with the problems caused by vagrants and beggars
[...More...]

"English Poor Laws" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Public Health
PUBLIC HEALTH refers to "the science and art of preventing disease, prolonging life and promoting human health through organized efforts and informed choices of society, organizations, public and private, communities and individuals." It is concerned with threats to health based on population health analysis. The population in question can be as small as a handful of people, or as large as all the inhabitants of several continents (for instance, in the case of a pandemic ). The dimensions of health can encompass "a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity," as defined by the United Nations' World Health Organization
[...More...]

"Public Health" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Strand, London
STRAND (or THE STRAND ) is a major thoroughfare in the City of Westminster
Westminster
, Central London
Central London
. It runs just over 3⁄4 mile (1,200 m) from Trafalgar Square eastwards to Temple Bar , where the road becomes Fleet Street
Fleet Street
inside the City of London
City of London
, and is part of the A4 , a main road running west from inner London. The road's name comes from the Old English
Old English
strond, meaning the edge of a river, as it historically ran alongside the north bank of the River Thames
River Thames
. The street was popular with the British upper classes between the 12th and 17th centuries, with many historically important mansions being built between the Strand and the river
[...More...]

"Strand, London" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Grade II Listed
A LISTED BUILDING or LISTED STRUCTURE, in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
, is one that has been placed on the Statutory List of Buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest. The statutory bodies maintaining the list are Historic England
Historic England
in England
England
; Cadw (The Historic Environment Service of the Welsh Government) in Wales
Wales
; Historic Scotland
Historic Scotland
in Scotland
Scotland
; and the Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) in Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
. The term has also been used in the Republic of Ireland
Republic of Ireland
, where buildings are surveyed for the National Inventory of Architectural Heritage in accordance with the country's obligations under the Granada Convention
[...More...]

"Grade II Listed" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Medical Act 1858
THE MEDICAL ACT (21 & 22 Vict c 90), An Act to Regulate the Qualifications of Practitioners in Medicine and Surgery, also referred to as the MEDICAL ACT 1858, was an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom which created the General Medical Council to regulate doctors in the UK . It is one of the Medical Acts . Describing its purpose, the Act notes that "it is expedient that Persons requiring Medical Aid should be enabled to distinguish qualified from unqualified Practitioners". The Act creates the position of Registrar of the General Medical Council — an office still in existence today — whose duty is to keep up-to-date records of those registered to practise medicine and to make them publicly available. The Act has now been almost entirely repealed. The current law governing medical regulation is the Medical Act 1983
[...More...]

"Medical Act 1858" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mental Capacity Act 2005
THE MENTAL CAPACITY ACT 2005 (c 9) is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
applying to England and Wales. Its primary purpose is to provide a legal framework for acting and making decisions on behalf of adults who lack the capacity to make particular decisions for themselves. CONTENTS* 1 Key features of the Act * 1.1 The five statutory principles * 1.2 Summary of other key elements of the Act * 2 Section 68 - Commencement and extent * 3 Timetable of new features * 4 Amendments * 4.1 UK legislation * 5 References * 6 Further reading * 7 External links KEY FEATURES OF THE ACTTHE FIVE STATUTORY PRINCIPLESThe five principles are outlined in the Section 1 of the Act. These are designed to protect people who lack capacity to make particular decisions, but also to maximise their ability to make decisions, or to participate in decision-making, as far as they are able to do so. 1
[...More...]

"Mental Capacity Act 2005" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Medical Ethics
MEDICAL ETHICS is a system of moral principles that apply values to the practice of clinical medicine and in scientific research. Medical ethics allow for people, regardless of race, gender, or religion to be guaranteed quality and principled care. This applies to both the living and nonliving, such as medical research on cadavers . It creates an obvious guideline to follow. Medical ethics
Medical ethics
is based on a set of values that professionals can refer to in the case of any confusion or conflict. These values include the respect for autonomy, non-maleficence, beneficence, and justice. These tenets allow doctors, care providers, and families to create a treatment plan and work towards the same common goal without any conflict. It is important to note that these four values are of equal worth
[...More...]

"Medical Ethics" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Medical Law
MEDICAL LAW is the branch of law which concerns the prerogatives and responsibilities of medical professionals and the rights of the patient . It should not be confused with medical jurisprudence , which is a branch of medicine , rather than a branch of law . The main branches of medical law are the law on confidentiality , negligence and torts in relation to medical treatment (most notably medical malpractice ), and criminal law and contract law in the field of medical practice and treatment. Ethics
Ethics
and medical practice is a growing field. CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 See also * 3 References * 4 Notable cases * 5 Further reading HISTORYThe first medical law recorded was the Code of Hammurabi
Code of Hammurabi
, which said; "If a physician makes a large incision with the operating knife, and kill him, ..
[...More...]

"Medical Law" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Organ Donation
ORGAN DONATION is when a person allows an organ of theirs to be removed, legally , either by consent while the donor is alive or after death with the assent of the next of kin. Donation may be for research, or, more commonly healthy transplantable organs and tissues may be donated to be transplanted into another person. Common transplantations include: kidneys , heart , liver , pancreas , intestines , lungs , bones , bone marrow , skin , and corneas . Some organs and tissues can be donated by living donors, such as a kidney or part of the liver, but most donations occur after the donor has died. As of August 1, 2016, there are 120,004 people waiting for life-saving organ transplants in the US. Of these, 96,645 await kidney transplants. While views of organ donation are positive there is a large gap between the numbers of registered donors compared to those awaiting organ donations on a global level
[...More...]

"Organ Donation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Patient Confidentiality
PHYSICIAN–PATIENT PRIVILEGE is a legal concept, related to medical confidentiality , that protects communications between a patient and his or her doctor from being used against the patient in court. It is a part of the rules of evidence in many common law jurisdictions. Almost every jurisdiction that recognizes physician–patient privilege not to testify in court, either by statute or though case law, limits the privilege to knowledge acquired during the course of providing medical services. In some jurisdictions, conversations between a patient and physician may be privileged in both criminal and civil courts. CONTENTS * 1 Scope * 2 United States
United States
* 3 Australia
Australia
* 4 See also * 5 References SCOPEThe privilege may cover the situation where a patient confesses to a psychiatrist that he or she committed a particular crime
[...More...]

"Patient Confidentiality" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Theosophical Society
TRADITIONAL AND CHRISTIAN THEOSOPHY CONTRIBUTORS * William Walker Atkinson · Franz von Baader * Nikolai Berdyaev · Jakob Boehme * Johann Jakob Brucker · Sergei Bulgakov * Henry Corbin · Karl von Eckartshausen * Florence Farr · Wassily Kandinsky
Wassily Kandinsky
* G. R. S. Mead
G. R. S

[...More...]

"Theosophical Society" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

World War I
Allied victory * Central Powers ' victory on the Eastern Front nullified by defeat on the Western Front * Fall of the German , Russian , Ottoman , and Austro-Hungarian empires * Russian Civil War and foundation of Soviet Union
Soviet Union
* Formation of new countries in Europe
Europe
and the Middle East * Transfer of German colonies and regions of the former Ottoman Empire to other powers * Establishment of the League of Nations
League of Nations
. (more..
[...More...]

"World War I" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Nutrition
NUTRITION is the science that interprets the interaction of nutrients and other substances in food in relation to maintenance, growth, reproduction, health and disease of an organism. It includes food intake, absorption, assimilation , biosynthesis , catabolism and excretion. The diet of an organism is what it eats, which is largely determined by the availability, the processing and palatability of foods. A healthy diet includes preparation of food and storage methods that preserve nutrients from oxidation, heat or leaching, and that reduce risk of foodborne illness . A poor diet can cause deficiency diseases such as blindness , anemia , scurvy , preterm birth , stillbirth and cretinism ; health-threatening conditions like obesity and metabolic syndrome ; and such common chronic systemic diseases as cardiovascular disease , diabetes , and osteoporosis
[...More...]

"Nutrition" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Physical Fitness
PHYSICAL FITNESS is a state of health and well-being and, more specifically, the ability to perform aspects of sports , occupations and daily activities. Physical fitness
Physical fitness
is generally achieved through proper nutrition , moderate-vigorous physical exercise , and sufficient rest. Before the industrial revolution, fitness was defined as the capacity to carry out the day’s activities without undue fatigue. However, with automation and changes in lifestyles physical fitness is now considered a measure of the body's ability to function efficiently and effectively in work and leisure activities, to be healthy , to resist hypokinetic diseases , and to meet emergency situations
[...More...]

"Physical Fitness" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Alcohol
In chemistry , an ALCOHOL is any organic compound in which the hydroxyl functional group (–O H ) is bound to a saturated carbon atom. The term alcohol originally referred to the primary alcohol ethanol (ethyl alcohol), the predominant alcohol in alcoholic beverages . The suffix -ol appears in the IUPAC
IUPAC
chemical name of all substances where the hydroxyl group is the functional group with the highest priority; in substances where a higher priority group is present the prefix hydroxy- will appear in the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry
Chemistry
(IUPAC) name. The suffix -ol in non-systematic names (such as paracetamol or cholesterol ) also typically indicates that the substance includes a hydroxyl functional group and, so, can be termed an alcohol. But many substances, particularly sugars (examples glucose and sucrose ) contain hydroxyl functional groups without using the suffix
[...More...]

"Alcohol" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.