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British Law
The United Kingdom
United Kingdom
has three legal systems, each of which applies to a particular geographical area.[1] English law
English law
applies in England
England
and Wales, Northern Ireland law applies in Northern Ireland, and Scots law applies in Scotland
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Middlesex Guildhall
The Middlesex
Middlesex
Guildhall is the home of the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom and of the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council. It stands on the south-west corner of Parliament Square
Parliament Square
in London.Contents1 History 2 Controversy over conversion 3 References 4 Further reading 5 External linksHistory[edit] The location in Parliament Square
Parliament Square
was the site of the belfry of Westminster Abbey. It was used as a market from 1750 to 1800. The justices of the City and Liberty of Westminster
City and Liberty of Westminster
took it over. They commissioned a guildhall, designed as an octagon with a Doric portico by Samuel Pepys Cockerell
Samuel Pepys Cockerell
in 1805. In 1889 Westminster became part of the County of London, outside of the county of Middlesex
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Jeremy Corbyn
Leader of the Labour Party Corbyn
Corbyn
leadership Corbynmania Constitutional Convention Bill Economic Advisory Committee Chakrabarti Inquiry Traingate Leadership challenge, 2016 ConferenceExiting the European Union European Union
European Union
beliefs EU referendum Labour In for Britain Invocation of Article 50 Aftermath of Brexit Brexit
Brexit
negotiationsElections2016 UK local elections 2016 London
London
Assembly election 2016 Police and Crime Commissioner elections 2017 UK local elections 2017 UK general electionCultural depictionsCorbyn: The Strange Rebirth of Radical Politics Comrade Corbyn: A Very Unlikely Coup Jeremy Corbyn: Accidental HeroPersonal life Honours and awardsv t eJeremy Bernard Corbyn
Corbyn
(/ˈkɔːrbɪn/; born 26 May 1949)[3] is a British politician serving as Leader of the Labour Party and Leader of the Opposition since 2015
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King-in-Council
The King-in-Council
King-in-Council
or Queen-in-Council, depending on the gender of the reigning monarch, is a constitutional term in a number of states. In a general sense, it would mean the monarch exercising executive authority, usually in the form of approving orders, in the presence of the country's executive council.Contents1 Norway 2 Sweden 3 The Commonwealth 4 See also4.1 Norway 4.2 Sweden 4.3 The Commonwealth5 FootnotesNorway[edit] Main article: Council of State (Norway) In Norway, the "King in Council" (Norwegian: Kongen i statsråd) refers to the meetings of the King and the Council of State (the Cabinet), where matters of importance and major decisions are made. The council meets at the Royal Palace and is normally held every Friday. It is chaired by the King or, if he is ill or abroad, the Crown Prince
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Legislature
A legislature is a deliberative assembly with the authority to make laws for a political entity such as a country or city. Legislatures form important parts of most governments; in the separation of powers model, they are often contrasted with the executive and judicial branches of government. Laws enacted by legislatures are known as legislation. Legislatures observe and steer governing actions and usually have exclusive authority to amend the budget or budgets involved in the process. The members of a legislature are called legislators
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56th Parliament Of The United Kingdom
In modern politics and history, a parliament is a legislative, elected body of government. Generally, a modern parliament has three functions: representing the electorate, making laws, and overseeing the government via hearings and inquiries. The term is similar to the idea of a senate, synod or congress, and is commonly used in countries that are current or former monarchies, a form of government with a monarch as the head. Some contexts restrict the use of the word parliament to parliamentary systems, although it is also used to describe the legislature in some presidential systems (e.g. the French parliament), even where it is not in the official name. Historically, parliaments included various kinds of deliberative, consultative, and judicial assemblies, e.g
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Queen-in-Parliament
The Queen-in-Parliament
Queen-in-Parliament
(or, during the reign of a male monarch, King-in-Parliament), sometimes referred to as the Crown-in-Parliament or, more fully, in the United Kingdom, as the King/Queen in Parliament under God,[1][2][3] is a technical term of constitutional law in the Commonwealth realms that refers to the Crown in its legislative role, acting with the advice and consent of the parliament (including, if the parliament is bicameral, both the lower house and upper house). Bills passed by the houses are sent to the sovereign, or governor-general, lieutenant-governor, or governor as her representative, for Royal Assent, which, once granted, makes the bill into law; these primary acts of legislation are known as acts of parliament
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Lord Speaker
The Lord Speaker
Lord Speaker
is the speaker of the House of Lords
House of Lords
in the Parliament of the United Kingdom. The office is analogous to the Speaker of the House of Commons: the Lord Speaker
Lord Speaker
is elected by the members of the House of Lords
House of Lords
and is expected to be politically impartial. Until July 2006, the role of presiding officer in the House of Lords was undertaken by the Lord Chancellor. Under the Constitutional Reform Act 2005, the position of the Speaker of the House of Lords
House of Lords
(as it is termed in the Act) became a separate office, allowing the position to be held by someone other than the Lord Chancellor
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Norman Fowler, Baron Fowler
Peter Norman Fowler, Baron Fowler, PC (born 2 February 1938) is a British politician who was a member of Margaret Thatcher's ministry. He is currently the Lord Speaker, having assumed office at the beginning of September 2016. After serving as Shadow Minister of Transport, he was appointed Minister of Transport in 1979, being responsible for making seat belts compulsory. Later, as Secretary of State for Health
Secretary of State for Health
and Social Services, he drew public attention to the dangers of AIDS. He resigned from the cabinet as Employment Secretary, and was knighted in 1990. He was Chairman of the Conservative Party
Chairman of the Conservative Party
from 1992 to 1994, Shadow Secretary of State for Environment, Transport and the Regions in 1997–98 and Shadow Home Secretary
Shadow Home Secretary
in 1998–99. In 2001, he was made a Conservative life peer
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Speaker Of The House Of Commons (United Kingdom)
The Speaker of the House of Commons is the presiding officer of the House of Commons, the United Kingdom's lower chamber of Parliament. The office is currently held by John Bercow, who was initially elected on 22 June 2009, following the resignation of Michael Martin. He was returned as an MP in the 2010 general election and was re-elected as Speaker when the House sat at the start of the new Parliament on 18 May 2010. He was again returned as an MP in the 2015 general election and was re-elected, unopposed, as Speaker when the House sat at the start of the new Parliament on 18 May 2015[1] and again on 13 June 2017.[2] The Speaker presides over the House's debates, determining which members may speak. The Speaker is also responsible for maintaining order during debate, and may punish members who break the rules of the House
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Leader Of The Opposition (United Kingdom)
The Leader of Her Majesty's Most Loyal Opposition (more commonly known as the Leader of the Opposition) is the politician who leads the official opposition in the United Kingdom. The Leader of the Opposition by convention leads the largest party not within the government: where one party wins outright this is the party leader of the second largest political party in the House of Commons. The current Leader of the Opposition is Jeremy Corbyn, leader of the Labour Party, who was elected to the leadership of the Labour Party on 12 September 2015.[2] The Leader of the Opposition is normally viewed as an alternative prime minister, and is appointed to the Privy Council. They lead an Official Opposition Shadow Cabinet which scrutinises the actions of the Cabinet led by the prime minister, as well as offer alternative policies. There is also a Leader of the Opposition in the House of Lords (currently The Baroness Smith of Basildon)
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Her Majesty's Most Loyal Opposition (United Kingdom)
Her Majesty's Most Loyal Opposition, or the Official Opposition, in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
is led by the Leader of the Opposition. This is usually the political party with the second-largest number of seats in the House of Commons, as the largest party will usually form Her Majesty's Government. Since May 2010, the Official Opposition has been the Labour Party, currently led by Jeremy Corbyn.Contents1 Origins 2 Opposition days 3 Leader of the Opposition 4 Ministers' Questions4.1 Prime Minister's Questions 4.2 Other Ministers' Questions5 Seating 6 See also 7 Notes 8 ReferencesOrigins[edit] The phrase His Majesty's Opposition was coined in 1826, before the advent of the modern two-party system, when Parliament consisted more of interests, relationships and factions rather than the highly coherent political parties of today (although the Whigs and Tories were the two main parties)
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Non-departmental Public Body
In the United Kingdom, non-departmental public body (NDPB) is a classification applied by the Cabinet Office, Treasury, the Scottish Government and the Northern Ireland Executive
Northern Ireland Executive
to quangos (quasi-autonomous non-governmental organisations)
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Official Opposition Shadow Cabinet (United Kingdom)
The Official Opposition Shadow Cabinet (usually known simply as the Shadow Cabinet) is, in British parliamentary practice, senior members of Her Majesty's Loyal Opposition who scrutinise their corresponding Government ministers, develop alternative policies, and hold the Government to account for its actions and responses. Since May 2010, the Labour Party has been Her Majesty's Loyal Opposition, and its leadership therefore forms the current Shadow Cabinet. Not all Opposition frontbenchers are members of the Shadow Cabinet, which is composed of the most senior Opposition Members (usually around twenty). The Leader of the Opposition, the Opposition Chief Whip and Opposition Deputy Chief Whip are the only Members of the Official Opposition to draw remuneration for their Opposition roles in addition to their salaries as Members of Parliament
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State Opening Of Parliament
The State Opening of Parliament
State Opening of Parliament
is an event which formally marks the beginning of a session of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. It includes a speech from the throne known as the Queen's Speech (or King's Speech). The State Opening is an elaborate ceremony showcasing British history, culture and contemporary politics to large crowds and television viewers. It takes place in the House of Lords
House of Lords
chamber, usually in May or June, but traditionally in November, in front of both Houses of Parliament. The monarch, wearing the Imperial State Crown, reads a speech that has been prepared by his or her government outlining its plans for that parliamentary year. A State Opening may take place at other times of the year if an election is held early due to a vote of no confidence in the government
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Prime Minister's Questions
Prime Minister's Questions
Prime Minister's Questions
(often abbreviated to PMQs and officially known as Questions to the Prime Minister) is a constitutional convention in the United Kingdom, currently held as a single session every Wednesday at noon when the House of Commons is sitting, during which the Prime Minister spends around half an hour answering questions from Members of Parliament (MPs).[1] In questioning the policies of government ministers, MP Amber Rudd states, “PMQs is central to our democracy.”[2]Contents1 History 2 Practice2.1 Deputy Prime Minister's Question
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