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British Archaeological Association
The British Archaeological Association (BAA) was founded in 1843 and aims to inspire, support and disseminate high quality research in the fields of Western archaeology, art and architecture, primarily of the mediæval period, through lectures, conferences, study days and publications. The BAA was founded in December 1843 by Charles Roach Smith, Thomas Wright and Thomas Joseph Pettigrew, to encourage the recording, preservation, and publication of archaeological discoveries, and to lobby for government assistance for the collection of British antiquities. All three men were Fellows of the Society of Antiquaries of London but felt the older body was too aristocratic, too London-focused and lacked the campaigning vigour required. The naming of the new body was symbolic: British referred to the campaign for a museum of British Antiquities, Archaeological differentiated their field from older antiquarian methods and Association had reformist, even revolutionary, overtones
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Archaeology
Archaeology, or archeology,[1] is the study of human activity through the recovery and analysis of material culture. The archaeological record consists of artifacts, architecture, biofacts or ecofacts, and cultural landscapes. Archaeology
Archaeology
can be considered both a social science and a branch of the humanities.[2][3] In North America, archaeology is considered a sub-field of anthropology,[4] while in Europe
Europe
archaeology is often viewed as either a discipline in its own right or a sub-field of other disciplines. Archaeologists study human prehistory and history, from the development of the first stone tools at Lomekwi
Lomekwi
in East Africa
Africa
3.3 million years ago up until recent decades. Archaeology
Archaeology
as a field is distinct from the discipline of palaeontology, the study of fossil remains
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Art
Art
Art
is a diverse range of human activities in creating visual, auditory or performing artifacts (artworks), expressing the author's imaginative or technical skill, intended to be appreciated for their beauty or emotional power.[1][2] In their most general form these activities include the production of works of art, the criticism of art, the study of the history of art, and the aesthetic dissemination of art. The oldest documented forms of art are visual arts, which include creation of images or objects in fields including today painting, sculpture, printmaking, photography, and other visual media.
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
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Caxton Hall
Coordinates: 51°29′55″N 0°8′6.5″W / 51.49861°N 0.135139°W / 51.49861; -0.135139Caxton Hall, 10 Caxton Street, London, SW1H 0AQ Caxton Hall
Caxton Hall
is a building on the corner of Caxton Street and Palmer Street, in Westminster, London, England. It is a Grade II listed building primarily noted for its historical associations. It hosted many mainstream and fringe political and artistic events and after the Second World War was the most popular register office used by high society and celebrities who required a civil marriage. History[edit] It was designed in 1878 by William Lee and F.J
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Worcester
Worcester
Worcester
(/ˈwʊstər/ ( listen) WUUS-tər) is a city in Worcestershire, England, 31 miles (50 km) southwest of Birmingham and 27 miles (43 km) north of Gloucester. The population is approximately 100,000. The River Severn
River Severn
flanks the western side of the city centre, which is overlooked by the 12th century Worcester Cathedral. The Battle of Worcester
Battle of Worcester
was the final battle of the English Civil War, where Oliver Cromwell's New Model Army
New Model Army
defeated King Charles I's Cavaliers
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Tractarian
The Oxford Movement
Oxford Movement
was a movement of High Church
High Church
members of the Church of England
Church of England
which eventually developed into Anglo-Catholicism. The movement, whose original devotees were mostly associated with the University of Oxford, argued for the reinstatement of some older Christian traditions of faith and their inclusion into Anglican liturgy and theology. They thought of Anglicanism
Anglicanism
as one of three branches of the One, Holy, Catholic, and Apostolic Church. The movement's philosophy was known as Tractarianism after its series of publications, the Tracts for the Times, published from 1833 to 1841. Tractarians were also disparagingly referred to as "Newmanites" (before 1845) and "Puseyites" (after 1845) after two prominent Tractarians, John Henry Newman
John Henry Newman
and Edward Bouverie Pusey
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Royal Archaeological Institute
The Royal Archaeological Institute (RAI) is a learned society, established in 1844, primarily devoted to the publication of the Archaeological Journal, a production of archaeological news that has been in print since 1844. The current president is Professor Timothy Champion.[1] Distinguished scholars David Breeze and Anthony Quiney are also among the Presidents Emeritus. The Institute's interests include all aspects of the archaeological, architectural and landscape history of the British Isles and former British Empire. It also conducts lectures and seminars, and both sponsors and participates in field trips to archaeological sites and landscapes. It coordinates with other archaeological groups as well. See also[edit]Society of Antiquaries of London Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and IrelandReferences[edit]^ "Keynote Speakers". Australia ICOMOS. 2006. Archived from the original on August 30, 2007
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Canterbury
Canterbury
Canterbury
(/ˈkæntərbri/ ( listen), /-bəri/, or /-bɛri/)[3] is a historic English cathedral city and UNESCO World Heritage Site, which lies at the heart of the City of Canterbury, a local government district of Kent, England. It lies on the River Stour. The Archbishop of Canterbury
Archbishop of Canterbury
is the primate of the Church of England and the worldwide Anglican Communion
Anglican Communion
owing to the importance of St Augustine, who served as the apostle to the pagan Kingdom of Kent around the turn of the 7th century. The city's cathedral became a major focus of pilgrimage following the 1170 martyrdom of Thomas Becket, although it had already been a well-trodden pilgrim destination since the murder of St Alphege
Alphege
by the men of King Canute in 1012
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British Association For The Advancement Of Science
The British Science Association
British Science Association
(BSA) is a charity and learned society founded in 1831 to aid in the promotion and development of science.[1] Until 2009 it was known as the British Association for the Advancement of Science (BA).[3]Contents1 History1.1 Foundation 1.2 Electrical standards 1.3 Other2 Perception of science in the UK2.1 British Science Festival 2.2 Science Communication Conference 2.3 British Science Week3 Presidents of the British Science Association 4 List of annual meetings 5 Structure 6 See also 7 Ref
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Society Of Antiquaries Of London
The Society of Antiquaries of London
London
(SAL) is a learned society "charged by its Royal Charter of 1751 with 'the encouragement, advancement and furtherance of the study and knowledge of the antiquities and history of this and other countries'."[1] It is based at Burlington House, Piccadilly, London
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Architecture
Architecture
Architecture
is both the process and the product of planning, designing, and constructing buildings or any other structures.[3] Architectural works, in the material form of buildings, are often perceived as cultural symbols and as works of art. Historical civilizations are often identified with their surviving architectural achievements. The term architecture is also used metaphorically to refer to the design of organizations and other abstract concepts
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Albert Conyngham
Albert Denison Denison, 1st Baron Londesborough, KCH, FRS, FSA (21 October 1805 – 15 January 1860) was a British Liberal Party[1] politician and diplomat, known as Lord Albert Conyngham from 1816-49.Contents1 Early life and career 2 Family 3 Death 4 Sources 5 References 6 External linksEarly life and career[edit] Born Hon. Albert Denison Conyngham, he was the third son of Henry Conyngham, 1st Marquess Conyngham and Elizabeth Denison. He was educated at Eton, and was commissioned a cornet and sub-lieutenant in the Royal Horse Guards, in 1821,[2] before joining the diplomatic service
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Thomas Joseph Pettigrew
Thomas Joseph Pettigrew (1791–1865), sometimes known as "Mummy" Pettigrew, was a surgeon and antiquarian who became an expert on Ancient Egyptian mummies. He became well known in London social circles for his private parties in which he unrolled and autopsied mummies for the entertainment of his guests.[1] Born in London in 1791, Thomas Pettigrew took medical studies, first as assistant to his father, who was a naval surgeon, and later as an apprentice at the Borough Hospitals. He had a distinguished medical career, becoming surgeon to the Duke of Kent and the Duke of Sussex. Pettigrew played an active role in intellectual Georgian and Victorian society, corresponding regularly with many well known surgeons, physicians, scientists, writers and artists, such as John Coakley Lettsom, Astley Cooper, Michael Faraday, George Cruikshank and Charles Dickens.[2]..
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Charles Edward Keyser
Charles Edward Keyser
Charles Edward Keyser
FSA[1] (10 September 1847 – 23 May 1929[2]) was a British stockbroker and authority on English church architecture.[3] In his later life, he became Lord of the Manor
Lord of the Manor
of Aldermaston
Aldermaston
in the English county of Berkshire.Contents1 Biography 2 Personal life 3 See also 4 Footnotes 5 SourcesBiography[edit] Charles Keyser was born in Paddington, London, to financier Charles Keyser (d. 1892) and Margaret Blore (daughter of Edward Blore).[3][4] Keyser attended Eton College, before studying Law at Trinity College, Cambridge. He gained his B. A. in 1870 and his MA in 1873.[3] Keyser joined Colne Valley Water, becoming the chairman.[5] At this time, he lived at Warren House in Stanmore
Stanmore
with his sister, Agnes. Leaving Warren House in approximately 1890, Keyser bought Merry Hill House in Bushey
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Thomas Wright (antiquarian)
Thomas Wright (23 April 1810 – 23 December 1877) was an English antiquarian and writer.Contents1 Life 2 Selected works 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksLife[edit] Wright was born near Ludlow, Shropshire, descended from a Quaker family formerly living at Bradford. He was educated at Ludlow
Ludlow
Grammar School and at Trinity College, Cambridge, whence he graduated in 1834.[1] While at Cambridge he contributed to the Gentleman's Magazine
Gentleman's Magazine
and other periodicals, and in 1835 he came to London to devote himself to a literary career. His first separate work was Early English Poetry in Black Letter, with Prefaces and Notes (1836, 4 vols. 12mo), which was followed during the next forty years by an extensive series of publications, many of lasting value. He helped to found the British Archaeological Association and the Percy, Camden and Shakespeare Societies
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