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Brita Zippel
Brita Zippel, also called Britta Sippel (died 29 April 1676) was an alleged Swedish witch, known as "Näslösan", one of the most famous figures of the great witch mania called "Det Stora oväsendet" ("The Great noise") in Sweden
Sweden
between 1668-1676, and the most famous of the city of Stockholm. Together with her sister Anna Zippel, she may be the most famous witch in Swedish history.Contents1 Background 2 Trial 3 Execution 4 See also 5 References and literatureBackground[edit] Brita Zippel was born into a wealthy family. Her father, who was of German descent and a master of ball sports, founded "Lilla Bollhuset", a building for sports for the upper classes. Her two brothers were sports instructors for the gentlemen of the court and the king, Charles XI. In 1669, at around 30 years old, she married a brick-master named Galle and had two children with him. Brita had a reputation for being temperamental and having poor self-control
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Sweden
Coordinates: 63°N 16°E / 63°N 16°E / 63; 16Kingdom of Sweden Konungariket Sverige[a]FlagGreater coat of armsMotto: (royal) "För Sverige – i tiden"[a] "For Sweden
Sweden
– With the Times"[1]Anthem: Du gamla, Du fria[b] Thou ancient, thou freeRoyal anthem: Kungssången Song of the KingLocation of  Sweden  (dark green) – in Europe  (green & dark grey) – in the European Union  (green)  –  [Legend]Capital and largest city Stockholm 59°21′N 18°4′E / 59.350°N 18.067°E / 59.35
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Witch
Witchcraft
Witchcraft
or witchery broadly means the practice of and belief in magical skills and abilities exercised by solitary practitioners and groups. Witchcraft
Witchcraft
is a broad term that varies culturally and societally, and thus can be difficult to define with precision,[1] therefore cross-cultural assumptions about the meaning or significance of the term should be applied with caution
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Ramsele Witch Trial
The Ramsele witch trial, which took place in 1634, is one of the few known Swedish witch trials before the great witch mania of 1668–1676. In the year of 1634 a man and several women were put on trial in the city of Ramsele in Ångermanland in Norrland in Sweden. This was during a period of starvation, and they were accused of having stolen milk from their neighbors. The man was said to have stabbed a knife in a wall and, uttering "terrible prayers," milked the wall through the knife. It had been claimed that the women had used small animals, hares and undefined creatures to milk cattle in their neighbor's barns. The women were pointed out by Barbro Påvelsdotter from Sandviken, who was the first to be arrested, and confirmed to have been with her to Blockula. Unfortunately, few records exist about this trial
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Elin I Horsnäs
Elin i Horsnäs (died after 28 September 1611) was an alleged Swedish witch, the most famous witch in Sweden before the great witch-mania of 1668–1676, and one of few witches in Sweden to be executed before 1668. Her trial is also the most documented trial of sorcery in Sweden before 1668.Contents1 First accusations 2 Håkan the witch hunter 3 Second accusation 4 The witch trial 5 ReferencesFirst accusations[edit] Elin was a widow who lived in Småland in the beginning of the 17th century. She had long been considered a witch, and there were many stories about her. In 1591, a woman, Maretta Laressa, argued with her and called her a witch, and Elin slapped her in front of several witnesses; Maretta died shortly after. She was accused of sorcery for the first time in 1599 or 1601. The executioner Håkan put her through the ordeal by water together with two other women, whose names are unknown
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Urban Hjärne
Urban Hjärne (20 December 1641 – 10 March 1724) was a Swedish chemist, geologist, physician and writer. He was born in Skworitz near Nyenschantz, Ingria, and educated at Dorpat (admitted 1655), Uppsala and Angers. He was awarded MD in 1670. He travelled to the Netherlands, England and France and then practised as a physician in Stockholm. He became Director of the State Chemical Laboratory in 1683, President of the Collegium Medicum in 1698 and President of the Bergskollegium (Board of Mines) in 1713. He was also the author of Stratonice, sometimes claimed to be the first Swedish novel, a partly autobiographical romance of seduction begun in 1665 and published in several parts, completed in 1668.[1] He built up scientific library of 3500 books, one of the largest in Sweden. In 1669 he was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society. He married three times: firstly Maria Svahn; secondly Catharina Elisabeth Bergenhielm; and thirdly Elisabeth Carlsdotter. References[edit]^ "Sweden"
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Hötorget
Hötorget (Haymarket) is a city square in the center of Stockholm. During the daytime it is the site of a fruit and vegetable market, except on Sundays, when flea markets are arranged. To its east lies the Royal Concert Hall, to its south lies Filmstaden Sergel, one of the largest multiscreen cinemas in inner-city Stockholm, and the Hötorgshallen food market halls, and to the west lies the Haymarket by Scandic hotel. Southeast of the square are the five high-rise office buildings Hötorgsskraporna. To the north is the Kungshallen food court. Hötorget Metro station was opened in 1952 and is decorated with light blue tiles. The station kept its "vintage" style, in contrast to other more modern stations on the same line, retaining its original construction arrangements and materials such as tiles, signs, illumination, etc
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Fever
Fever, also known as pyrexia and febrile response,[6] is defined as having a temperature above the normal range due to an increase in the body's temperature set-point.[4][5] There is not a single agreed-upon upper limit for normal temperature with sources using values between 37.5 and 38.3 °C (99.5 and 100.9 °F).[6][7] The increase in set-point triggers increased muscle contractions and causes a feeling of cold.[1] This results in greater heat production and efforts to conserve heat.[2] When the set-point temperature returns to normal, a person feels hot, becomes flushed, and may begin to sweat.[2] Rarely a fever may trigger a febrile seizure.[3] This is more common in young children.[3] Fevers do not typically go higher than 41 to 42 °C (105.8 to 107.6 °F).[5] A fever can be caused by many medical conditions ranging from non serious to life threatening.[11] This includes viral, bacterial and parasitic infections such as the common cold, urinary tract infections
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Blockula
Blockula (Blåkulla in modern Swedish) was a legendary island where the Devil held his Earthly court during a witches' Sabbath. This island could only be reached by a magical flight. It was described as "a delicate large Meadow, whereof you can see no end". There was said to be a large gate located in the meadow that led to a smaller meadow. In the smaller meadow there stood a house. In an enormous room in this house: "[…] there stood a very long Table, at which the Witches did sit down: And […] hard by this Room was another Chamber, where there were very lovely and delicate Beds." The Devil was dressed "in a gray Coat, and red and blue Stockings: He had a red Beard, a high-crown’d Hat, with Linnen of divers Colours, wrapt about it, and long Garters upon his Stockings"
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Dice
Dice
Dice
(singular die or dice;[1] from Old French
Old French
dé; from Latin
Latin
datum "something which is given or played"[2]) are small throwable objects with multiple resting positions, used for generating random numbers. Dice
Dice
are suitable as gambling devices for games like craps and are also used in non-gambling tabletop games. A traditional die is a cube, with each of its six faces showing a different number of dots (pips) from 1 to 6. When thrown or rolled, the die comes to rest showing on its upper surface a random integer from one to six, each value being equally likely. A variety of similar devices are also described as dice; such specialized dice may have polyhedral or irregular shapes and may have faces marked with symbols instead of numbers. They may be used to produce results other than one through six
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Satan
Satan[a] is an entity in the Abrahamic religions
Abrahamic religions
that seduces humans into sin. In Christianity
Christianity
and Islam, he is usually seen as a fallen angel, or a jinni, who used to possess great piety and beauty, but rebelled against God, who nevertheless allows him temporary power over the fallen world and a host of demons. A figure known as "the satan" first appears in the Tanakh
Tanakh
as a heavenly prosecutor, a member of the sons of God
God
subordinate to Yahweh, who prosecutes the nation of Judah in the heavenly court and tests the loyalty of Yahweh's followers by forcing them to suffer. During the intertestamental period, possibly due to influence from the Zoroastrian figure of Angra Mainyu, the satan developed into a malevolent entity with abhorrent qualities in dualistic opposition to God
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Witches' Sabbath
The Witches' Sabbath
Witches' Sabbath
is a meeting of those who practice witchcraft and other rites
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Syphilis
Syphilis
Syphilis
is a sexually transmitted infection caused by the bacterium Treponema pallidum
Treponema pallidum
subspecies pallidum.[2] The signs and symptoms of syphilis vary depending in which of the four stages it presents (primary, secondary, latent, and tertiary).[1] The primary stage classically pres
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Charles XI Of Sweden
Charles XI, also Carl (Swedish: Karl XI; 24 November 1655old style – 5 April 1697old style[1]), was King of Sweden
Sweden
from 1660 until his death, in a period of Swedish history known as the Swedish Empire (1611–1718). Charles was the only son of King Charles X Gustav
Charles X Gustav
of Sweden
Sweden
and Hedwig Eleonora of Holstein-Gottorp. His father died when he was five years old, so Charles was educated by his governors until his coronation at the age of seventeen. Soon after, he was forced out on military expeditions to secure the recently acquired dominions from Danish troops in the Scanian War. Having successfully fought off the Danes, he returned to Stockholm
Stockholm
and engaged in correcting the country's neglected political, financial and economic situation, managing to sustain peace during the remaining 20 years of his reign
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Bollhuset
Bollhuset, also called Stora Bollhuset
Bollhuset
(The Big Ball House), Bollhusteatern (Ball House Theater), and Gamla Bollhuset
Bollhuset
(Old Ball House) at various times, was the name of the first theater in Stockholm, Sweden; it was the first Swedish theater and the first real theater building in the whole of Scandinavia. The name "Bollhuset" means "The Ball House", and it was built in 1627 for ball sports and used in this way for forty years. The name Lejonkulan, however, was in fact the name of a different building, which was also used by the same theater in the 17th century. Bollhuset
Bollhuset
was the scene of a long series of most important events in the history of the theater in the city and in the history of Swedish theater
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