HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

picture info

Bristle-thighed Curlew
Numenius femoralisThe bristle-thighed curlew (Numenius tahitiensis) is a medium-sized shorebird that breeds in Alaska
Alaska
and winters on tropical Pacific islands. It has a long, decurved bill and bristled feathers at the base of the legs. Its length is about 40–44 cm and wingspan about 84 cm (females averaging bigger than males). The size and shape are the same as the whimbrel's, and the plumage is similar, spotted brown on their upper body with a light belly and rust-colored or buffy tail
[...More...]

"Bristle-thighed Curlew" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Conservation Status
The conservation status of a group of organisms (for instance, a species) indicates whether the group still exists and how likely the group is to become extinct in the near future
[...More...]

"Conservation Status" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Hawaiian Islands
The Hawaiian Islands
Hawaiian Islands
(Hawaiian: Mokupuni o Hawai‘i) are an archipelago of eight major islands, several atolls, numerous smaller islets, and seamounts in the North Pacific Ocean, extending some 1,500 miles (2,400 kilometers) from the island of Hawaiʻi in the south to northernmost Kure Atoll. Formerly the group was known to Europeans and Americans as the "Sandwich Islands", a name chosen by James Cook
James Cook
in honor of the then First Lord of the Admiralty
First Lord of the Admiralty
John Montagu, 4th Earl of Sandwich. The contemporary name is derived from the name of the largest island, Hawaii
Hawaii
Island. The Hawaiian monarchy was overthrown in 1893. The islands were subsequently put under the control of a republic, which the United States annexed in 1898.[1] The U.S. state
U.S

[...More...]

"Hawaiian Islands" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Bird Nest
A bird nest is the spot in which a bird lays and incubates its eggs and raises its young. Although the term popularly refers to a specific structure made by the bird itself—such as the grassy cup nest of the American robin
American robin
or Eurasian blackbird, or the elaborately woven hanging nest of the Montezuma oropendola
Montezuma oropendola
or the village weaver—that is too restrictive a definition. For some species, a nest is simply a shallow depression made in sand; for others, it is the knot-hole left by a broken branch, a burrow dug into the ground, a chamber drilled into a tree, an enormous rotting pile of vegetation and earth, a shelf made of dried saliva or a mud dome with an entrance tunnel
[...More...]

"Bird Nest" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Bird Migration
Bird
Bird
migration is the regular seasonal movement, often north and south along a flyway, between breeding and wintering grounds. Many species of bird migrate. Migration carries high costs in predation and mortality, including from hunting by humans, and is driven primarily by availability of food. It occurs mainly in the northern hemisphere, where birds are funneled on to specific routes by natural barriers such as the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
or the Caribbean Sea. Migration of species such as storks, turtle doves, and swallows was recorded as many as 3,000 years ago by Ancient Greek authors, including Homer
Homer
and Aristotle, and in the Book of Job
[...More...]

"Bird Migration" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Molt
In biology, moulting (British English), or molting (American English), also known as sloughing, shedding, or in many invertebrates, ecdysis, is the manner in which an animal routinely casts off a part of its body (often, but not always, an outer layer or covering), either at specific times of the year, or at specific points in its life cycle. Moulting
Moulting
can involve shedding the epidermis (skin), pelage (hair, feathers, fur, wool), or other external layer. In some groups, other body parts may be shed, for example, wings in some insects or the entire exoskeleton in arthropods.Contents1 Examples 2 In birds2.1 Forced moulting3 In reptiles 4 In arthropods 5 In dogs 6 In amphibians 7 Gallery 8 References 9 External linksExamples[edit]Group Item shed Timing NotesCats Fur Usually around spring-summer time Cats moult fur around spring-summer time to get rid of their "winter coat"
[...More...]

"Molt" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Diurnality
Diurnality
Diurnality
is a form of plant or animal behavior characterized by activity during the day, with a period of sleeping, or other inactivity, at night. The common adjective used for daytime activity is "diurnal". The timing of activity by an animal depends on a variety of environmental factors such as the temperature, the ability to gather food by sight, the risk of predation, and the time of year. Diurnality
Diurnality
is a cycle of activity within a twenty-four-hour period; cyclic activities called circadian rhythms are endogenous cycles not dependent on external cues or environmental factors. Animals active at dawn or dusk are crepuscular, those active at night are nocturnal, and animals active at sporadic times during both night and day are cathemeral. Plants that open their flowers during the day are referred to as diurnal, while those that bloom at night are nocturnal
[...More...]

"Diurnality" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Oceania
Oceania
Oceania
(UK: /ˌoʊʃiˈɑːniə, ˌoʊsi-/[3] or US: /ˌoʊʃiːˈæniə/[4]) is a geographic region comprising Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia
Polynesia
and Australasia.[5] Spanning the eastern and western hemispheres, Oceania
Oceania
covers an area of 8,525,989 square kilometres (3,291,903 sq mi) and has a population of 40 million
[...More...]

"Oceania" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Micronesia
Micronesia
Micronesia
(from Greek: μικρός mikrós "small" and Greek: νῆσος nêsos "island") is a subregion of Oceania, composed of thousands of small islands in the western Pacific Ocean. It has a shared cultural history with two other island regions, Polynesia
Polynesia
to the east and Melanesia
Melanesia
to the south. The region has a tropical marine climate, and is part of the Oceania ecozone. There are four main archipelagos along with numerous outlying islands. Micronesia
Micronesia
is divided politically among several sovereign countries. One of these is the Federated States of Micronesia, which is often called "Micronesia" for short and is not to be confused with the overall region
[...More...]

"Micronesia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Fiji
Fiji
Fiji
(/ˈfiːdʒiː/ ( listen) FEE-jee; Fijian: Viti [ˈβitʃi]; Fiji
Fiji
Hindi: फ़िजी), officially the Republic
Republic
of Fiji[11] (Fijian: Matanitu Tugalala o Viti;[12] Fiji
Fiji
Hindi: फ़िजी गणराज्य),[13] is an island country in Melanesia
Melanesia
in the South Pacific Ocean
Pacific Ocean
about 1,100 nautical miles (2,000 km; 1,300 mi) northeast of New Zealand's North Island
[...More...]

"Fiji" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Tuvalu
Coordinates: 8°31′15″S 179°11′55″E / 8.52083°S 179.19861°E / -8.52083; 179.19861TuvaluFlagCoat of armsMotto: " Tuvalu
Tuvalu
mo te Atua" (Tuvaluan) " Tuvalu
Tuvalu
for the Almighty"Anthem: 
[...More...]

"Tuvalu" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Tonga
Coordinates: 20°S 175°W / 20°S 175°W / -20; -175Kingdom of Tonga Puleʻanga Fakatuʻi ʻo Tonga
Tonga
(Tongan)FlagCoat of armsMotto: "Ko e ʻOtua mo Tonga
[...More...]

"Tonga" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Samoa
Coordinates: 13°35′S 172°20′W / 13.583°S 172.333°W / -13.583; -172.333Independent State of Samoa Malo Saʻoloto Tutoʻatasi o Sāmoa  (Samoan)FlagCoat of armsMotto: "Faʻavae i le Atua Sāmoa" " Samoa
Samoa
is founded on God"Anthem: O le fuʻa o le saʻolotoga o Samoa "The Banner of Freedom" The National Anthem of SamoaCapital and largest city Apia 13°50
[...More...]

"Samoa" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Seward Peninsula
The Seward Peninsula
Seward Peninsula
is a large peninsula on the western coast of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Alaska. It projects about 320 kilometers (200 mi) into the Bering Sea
Bering Sea
between Norton Sound, the Bering Strait, the Chukchi Sea, and Kotzebue Sound, just below the Arctic
Arctic
Circle. The entire peninsula is about 330 kilometers (210 mi) long and 145 km (90 mi)-225 km (140 mi) wide. Like Seward, Alaska, it was named after William H. Seward, the United States Secretary of State who fought for the U.S. purchase of Alaska. The Seward Peninsula
Seward Peninsula
is a remnant of the Bering land bridge, a roughly thousand mile wide swath of land connecting Siberia
Siberia
with mainland Alaska
Alaska
during the Pleistocene
Pleistocene
Ice Age
[...More...]

"Seward Peninsula" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

French Polynesia
French Polynesia
Polynesia
(/ˈfrɛntʃ pɒlɪˈniːʒə/ ( listen); French: Polynésie française [pɔlinezi fʁɑ̃sɛz]; Tahitian: Pōrīnetia Farāni) is an overseas collectivity of the French Republic; collectivité d'outre-mer de la République française  pronunciation (help·info) (COM), sometimes unofficially referred to as an overseas country; pays d'outre-mer (POM). It is composed of 118 geographically dispersed islands and atolls stretching over an expanse of more than 2,000 kilometres (1,200 mi) in the South Pacific Ocean. Its total land area is 4,167 square kilometres (1,609 sq mi). French Polynesia
Polynesia
is divided into five groups of islands: the Society Islands archipelago, composed of the Windward Islands and the Leeward Islands; the Tuamotu Archipelago; the Gambier Islands; the Marquesas Islands; and the Austral Islands. Among its 118 islands and atolls, 67 are inhabited
[...More...]

"French Polynesia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Predator
In an ecosystem, predation is a biological interaction where a predator (an organism that is hunting) feeds on its prey (the organism that is attacked).[1] Predators may or may not kill their prey prior to feeding on it, but the act of predation often results in the death of the prey and the eventual absorption of the prey's tissue through digestion
[...More...]

"Predator" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.