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Brioude
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Brioude
Brioude
(French pronunciation: ​[bʁijud]; Auvergnat: Briude) is a commune in the Haute-Loire
Haute-Loire
department in the Auvergne region in south-central France. It lies on the banks of the River Allier, a tributary of the Loire.Contents1 History 2 Population 3 Sights 4 People 5 Twin towns 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] At Brioude, the ancient Brivas, its martyrs in the 4th century, Julien and Ferréol, became its patron saints; according to the Chronicle of Moissac, Euric
Euric
of Toulouse had the basilica built, in the fourteenth year of his reign (c
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Subprefectures In France
In France, a subprefecture (French: sous-préfecture) is the administrative center of a departmental arrondissement that does not contain the prefecture for its department. The term also applies to the building that houses the administrative headquarters for an arrondissement. The civil servant in charge of a subprefecture is the subprefect, assisted by a general secretary
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Burgundians
The Burgundians
Burgundians
(Latin: Burgundiōnes, Burgundī; Old Norse: Burgundar; Old English: Burgendas; Greek: Βούργουνδοι) were a large East Germanic or Vandal
Vandal
tribe, or group of tribes, who lived in the area of modern Poland
Poland
in the time of the Roman Empire. In the late Roman period, as the empire came under pressure from many such "barbarian" peoples, a powerful group of Burgundians
Burgundians
and other Vandalic
Vandalic
tribes moved westwards towards the Roman frontiers along the Rhine
Rhine
Valley, making them neighbors of the Franks
Franks
who formed their kingdoms to the north, and the Suebic Alemanni
Alemanni
who were settling to their south, also near the Rhine
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Regions In France
(including overseas)Departments (including overseas)ArrondissementsCantonsIntercommunality Métropole Communauté urbaine Communauté d'agglomération Communauté de communesCommunes Associated communes Municipal arrondissementsOthers in Overseas France Overseas collectivities Sui generis collectivity Overseas country Overseas territory Clipperton IslandFrance is divided into 18 administrative regions (French: région, [ʁeʒjɔ̃]), including 13 metropolitan regions and 5 overseas regions.[1] The 13 metropolitan regions (including 12 mainland regions and Corsica) are each further subdivided into 2 to 13 departments, while the overseas regions consist of only one department each and hence are also referred to as "overseas departments"
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Communes Of France
(including overseas)Departments (including overseas)ArrondissementsCantonsIntercommunality Métropole Communauté urbaine Communauté d'agglomération Communauté de communesCommunes Associated communes Municipal arrondissementsOthers in Overseas France Overseas collectivities Sui generis collectivity Overseas country Overseas territory Clipperton IslandThe commune (French pronunciation: ​[kɔmyn]) is a level of administrative division in the French Republic. French communes are roughly equivalent to civil townships and incorporated municipalities in the United States
United States
or Gemeinden in Germany. The United Kingdom has no exact equivalent, as communes resemble districts in urban areas, but are closer to parishes in rural areas where districts are much larger
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Chronicle Of Moissac
The Chronicle of Moissac (also known as Chronicon Moissiacense) is an anonymous compilation that was discovered in the abbey of Moissac, but is now thought to have been compiled in the Catalan monastery of Ripoll
Ripoll
in the end of the tenth century.[1] Like most chronicles, it begins with Adam, but gains increasing interest for historians as it nears its end date of 828. Unfortunately the entries covering the years 716-770 are missing.[1] The only surviving manuscript of the Chronicle of Moissac dates from the 11th century and is now in the French National Library in Paris (Cod. Paris. lat
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Euric
Euric
Euric
(Gothic: *Aiwareiks[1]), also known as Evaric, or Eurico in Spanish and Portuguese (c. 440 – 28 December 484), son of Theodoric I, ruled as king (rex) of the Visigoths, after murdering his brother, Theodoric II,[2] from 466 until his death in 484. Sometimes he is called Euric
Euric
II. With his capital at Toulouse, Euric
Euric
inherited a large portion of the Visigothic possessions in the Aquitaine
Aquitaine
region of Gaul, an area that had been under Visigothic control since 415
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Gregory Of Tours
Saint Gregory of Tours
Tours
(30 November c. 538 – 17 November 594) was a Gallo-Roman
Gallo-Roman
historian and Bishop of Tours, which made him a leading prelate of the area that had been previously referred to as Gaul
Gaul
by the Romans. He was born Georgius Florentius and later added the name Gregorius in honour of his maternal great-grandfather.[2] He is the primary contemporary source for Merovingian
Merovingian
history. His most notable work was his Decem Libri Historiarum (Ten Books of Histories), better known as the Historia Francorum ( History
History
of the Franks), a title that later chroniclers gave to it, but he is also known for his accounts of the miracles of saints, especially four books of the miracles of St. Martin of Tours. St. Martin's tomb was a major pilgrimage destination in the 6th century, and St
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Franks
The Franks
Franks
(Latin: Franci or Latin: gens Francorum) were a collection of Germanic peoples, whose name was first mentioned in 3rd century Roman sources, associated with tribes on the Lower and Middle Rhine
Middle Rhine
in the 3rd century AD, on the edge of the Roman Empire. Later the term is associated with Romanized Germanic dynasties within the collapsing Roman Empire, who eventually commanded the whole region between the rivers Loire
Loire
and Rhine, and imposed power over many other post-Roman kingdoms and Germanic peoples, later being recognized by the Catholic church as successors to the old rulers of the Western Roman Empire.[1][2][3][a] Although the Frankish name only appears in the 3rd century, at least some of the original Frankish tribes had long been known under their own names to the Romans, both as allies providing soldiers, and as enemies
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Goths
The Goths
Goths
were an East Germanic people, two of whose branches, the Visigoths
Visigoths
and the Ostrogoths, played an important role in the fall of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
and the emergence of Medieval Europe. The Goths
Goths
dominated a vast area,[1] which at its peak under the Germanic king Ermanaric and his sub-king Athanaric possibly extended all the way from the Danube
Danube
to the Don, and from the Black Sea
Black Sea
to the Baltic Sea.[2] The Goths
Goths
spoke the Gothic language, one of the extinct East Germanic languages
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Saracen
Saracen
Saracen
was a term widely used among Christian writers in Europe during the Middle Ages. The term's meaning evolved during its history. In the early centuries of the Common Era, Greek and Latin writings used this term to refer to the people who lived in desert areas in and near the Roman province of Arabia Petraea, and who were specifically distinguished from others as a people known as Arabs.[1][2] In Europe during the Early Middle Ages, the term came to be associated with tribes of Arabia as well.[3] By the 12th century, "Saracen" had become synonymous with "Muslim" in Medieval Latin
Medieval Latin
literature
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Population Without Double Counting
Population without double counting is an English translation of the French phrase Population sans doubles comptes. In France, for the purposes of the census, the INSEE has defined several population indicators that allow people who live in more than one place to be counted in each place, to study and keep count of population movement. So each commune in France
France
does not have only one figure for the population, but several; for example students may be counted both where they study and where they live when not studying
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Normans
The Normans
Normans
(Norman: Normaunds; French: Normands; Latin: Normanni) were the people who, in the 10th and 11th centuries, gave their name to Normandy, a region in France
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French Denier
The denier (Latin: denarius; abbr. d.) or penny was a medieval coin which takes its name from the Frankish coin first issued in the late seventh century;[1] in English it is sometimes referred to as a silver penny. Its appearance represents the end of gold coinage, which, at the start of Frankish rule, had either been Byzantine or "pseudo-imperial" (minted by the Franks in imitation of Byzantine coinage)
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Arles
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Arles
Arles
(French pronunciation: ​[aʁl]; Provençal Arle [ˈaʀle] in both classical and Mistralian
Mistralian
norms; Arelate in Classical Latin) is a city and commune in the south of France, in the Bouches-du-Rhône department, of which it is a subprefecture, in the former province of Provence. A large part of the Camargue
Camargue
is located on the territory of the commune, making it the largest commune in Metropolitan France
France
in terms of territory (though Maripasoula, French Guiana, is much larger)
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Maison De Polignac
Polignac is the name of a French noble family that took its name from the château de Polignac, of which they had been sieurs since Carolingian times. In 1385, the male line became extinct, but the heiress married Guillaume, sire de Chalancon, who assumed the name and arms of Polignac
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