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Brett Lee
Brett Lee
Brett Lee
(born 8 November 1976) is a former Australian international cricketer, who played all three formats of the game. During his international career, Lee was recognised as one of fastest bowlers in the world of cricket along with Shoaib Akhtar. He is known for his consistency of pace, and has bowled over 150 kilometres per hour (93 mph) throughout his career. His quickest delivery was 161.8 km/h (100.5 mph) in a test match against the West Indies in 2002, but because they were playing in a charity match, it was not officially recognised as the fastest delivery ever. After that the world record for the fastest delivery ever is held by Shoaib Akhtar
Shoaib Akhtar
at 161.4 km/h (100.3 mph). Lee's quickest delivery in ODIs is 161.1 km/h (100.1 mph) playing against New Zealand in 2005. Lee bowled at a hundred miles an hour many times throughout his cricketing career
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List A Cricket
List A cricket is a classification of the limited-overs (one-day) form of the sport of cricket. List A cricket includes One Day International (ODI) matches and various domestic competitions in which the number of overs in an innings per team ranges from forty to sixty, as well as some international matches involving nations who have not achieved official ODI status
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2007 Cricket World Cup
The 2007 Cricket World Cup
Cricket World Cup
(officially known as ICC Cricket World Cup 2007) was the 9th edition of the Cricket World Cup
Cricket World Cup
tournament that took place in the West Indies
West Indies
from 13 March to 28 April 2007, using the sport's One Day International
One Day International
(ODI) format. There were a total of 51 matches played, three fewer than at the 2003 World Cup (despite a field larger by two teams). The 16 competing teams were initially divided into four groups, with the two best-performing teams from each group moving on to a "Super 8" format. From this, Australia, New Zealand, Sri Lanka, and South Africa won through to the semi-finals, with Australia
Australia
defeating Sri Lanka in the final to win their third consecutive World Cup and their fourth overall
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Shoaib Akhtar
Shoaib Akhtar
Shoaib Akhtar
( pronunciation (help·info); born 13 August 1975) is a former Pakistani cricketer, who played all formats of the game for fourteen years. He is the fastest bowler ever in the history of cricket, who delivered the fastest delivery officially recorded at a top speed of 161.3 km/h in a pool match against England in the 2003 Cricket
Cricket
World Cup. Akhtar was nicknamed as " Rawalpindi
Rawalpindi
Express" & "Tiger", as a tribute to his hometown and fast bowling.[1][2][3] He is the first bowler to break the 100 mph barrier as well, which he did twice in his career. Akhtar made his Test debut in November 1997 as an opening fast bowler and played his first One Day International
One Day International
three months later
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Cricket
Cricket
Cricket
is a bat-and-ball game played between two teams of eleven players each on a cricket field, at the centre of which is a rectangular 20-metre (22-yard) pitch with a target at each end called the wicket (a set of three wooden stumps upon which two bails sit). Each phase of play is called an innings, during which one team bats, attempting to score as many runs as possible, whilst their opponents bowl and field, attempting to minimise the number of runs scored. When each innings ends, the teams usually swap roles for the next innings (i.e. the team that previously batted will bowl/field, and vice versa). The teams each bat for one or two innings, depending on the type of match
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Stumped
Stumped
Stumped
is a method of dismissal in cricket.[1] The action of stumping can only be performed by a wicket-keeper and, according to the Laws of Cricket, a batsman can be given out stumped if:the wicket-keeper puts down the wicket, while the batsman is:out of his ground (because he has moved down the pitch beyond the popping crease, usually in an attempt to hit the ball); and not attempting a run.Being "out of his ground" is defined as not having any part of the batsman's body or his bat touching the ground behind the crease – i.e., if his bat is slightly elevated from the floor despite being behind the crease, or if his foot is on the crease line itself but not completely across it and touching the ground behind it, then he would be considered out (if stumped). One of the fielding team (such as the wicket-keeper himself) must appeal for the wicket by asking the umpire
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Innings
An innings is one of the divisions of a cricket match during which one team takes its turn to bat. Innings also means the period in which an individual player bats. Innings, in cricket, and rounders, is both singular and plural, which contrasts with baseball and softball in which the singular is "inning".Contents1 Origin 2 Usage in cricket 3 Metaphor 4 See also 5 References 6 Bibliography 7 External linksOrigin[edit] The earliest known record of the term concerns a match on Wednesday, 5 August 1730 at Blackheath, Kent
Kent
between Kent
Kent
and London. The London-based newspaper St. James Evening Post reported on Saturday, 8 August: "'Twas thought that the Kentish champions would have lost their honours by being beat at one innings if time had permitted". This is the first time that the word "innings" is found in contemporary records
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Bowling Average
The bowling average is one of a number of statistics used to compare bowlers in the sport of cricket. It is the ratio of runs conceded per wickets taken, meaning that the lower the bowling average is, the better the bowler is performing. The bowling average is commonly used alongside the economy rate and the strike rate to judge the overall performance of a bowler. Where a bowler has taken only a small number of wickets, their average can be artificially low, and an increase in wickets taken can result in large changes in their bowling average. Due to this, qualification caveats are generally applied to determine career records for bowling averages
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Wicket
In the sport of cricket, the wicket is one of the two sets of three stumps and two bails at either end of the pitch.[1] The wicket is guarded by a batsman who, with his bat, attempts to prevent the ball from hitting the wicket. The origin of the word is from wicket gate, a small gate. Historically, cricket wickets had only two stumps and one bail and looked like a gate
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Delivery (cricket)
A delivery or ball in cricket is a single action of bowling a cricket ball toward the batsman. During play of the game, a member of the fielding team is designated as the bowler, and bowls deliveries toward the batsman. Six legal balls in a row constitutes an over, after which a different member of the fielding side takes over the role of bowler for the next over. The bowler delivers the ball from his or her end of the pitch toward the batsman standing at the opposite wicket at the other end of the pitch. Bowlers can be either left-handed or right-handed
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New South Wales
New South Wales
Wales
(abbreviated as NSW) is a state on the east coast of Australia. It borders Queensland
Queensland
to the north, Victoria to the south, and South Australia
Australia
to the west. Its coast borders the Tasman Sea
Tasman Sea
to the east. The Australian Capital Territory
Australian Capital Territory
is an enclave within the state. New South Wales' state capital is Sydney, which is also Australia's most populous city. In March 2017[update], the population of New South Wales
Wales
was over 7.8 million,[9] making it Australia's most populous state
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First-class Cricket
First-class cricket is an official classification of the highest standard international or domestic matches in the sport of cricket. A first-class match is of three or more days' scheduled duration between two sides of eleven players each and is officially adjudged to be worthy of the status by virtue of the standard of the competing teams. Matches must allow for the teams to play two innings each although, in practice, a team might only play one innings or none at all. First-class cricket (which for this purpose includes all "important matches" played before 1895), along with historical single wicket and the modern limited overs forms of List A and Twenty20, is one of the highest standard forms of cricket. The origin of the term "first-class cricket" is unknown but it was used loosely before it acquired an official status, effective in 1895, following a meeting of leading English clubs in May 1894
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Test Cricket
Test cricket
Test cricket
is the longest form of the sport of cricket and is considered its highest standard.[1][2] Test matches are played between national representative teams with "Test status", as determined and conferred by the International Cricket
Cricket
Council (ICC). The two teams of 11 players play a four-innings match, which may last up to five days (or longer in some historical cases)
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Otago Cricket Team
The Otago
Otago
cricket team (nicknamed the Volts since the 1997-98 season[1]) are a New Zealand
New Zealand
first class cricket team formed in 1876 representing the Otago, Southland and North Otago
Otago
regions. Their main governing board is the Otago
Otago
Cricket
Cricket
Association which is one of six major associations that make up New Zealand
New Zealand
Cricket. The team plays most of its home games at the University Oval in Dunedin, but occasionally plays games at the Events Centre in Queenstown, Queen's Park Ground in Invercargill
Invercargill
and Molyneux Park in Alexandra
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Batting Order (cricket)
In cricket, the batting order is the sequence in which batsmen play through their team's innings, there always being two batsmen taking part at any one time
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Batsman
In the sport of cricket, batting is the act or skill of hitting the cricket ball with a cricket bat to score runs or prevent the loss of one's wicket. Any player who is currently batting is denoted as a batsman, regardless of their particular area of expertise (though see special senses in 'Terminology' below). Batsmen have to adapt to various conditions when playing on different cricket pitches, especially in different countries: therefore, as well as having outstanding physical batting skills, top-level batsmen will have lightning reflexes, excellent decision-making and be good strategists. During an innings two members of the batting side are on the pitch at any time: the one facing the current delivery from the bowler is denoted the striker, while the other is the non-striker. When a batsman is out, he is replaced by a teammate
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