HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Bremen, Georgia
BREMEN is a city in Haralson and Carroll counties, Georgia , United States. As of the 2010 census , the city had a population of 6,227, up from 4,579 at the 2000 census. Most of the city is in Haralson County, with a small portion in Carroll County. Locally, the name of the city is pronounced BREE-men. Sharon Sewell is the current mayor
[...More...]

"Bremen, Georgia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

1930 United States Census
The FIFTEENTH UNITED STATES CENSUS , conducted by the Census Bureau one month from April 1, 1930, determined the resident population of the United States to be 122,775,046, an increase of 13.7 percent over the 106,021,537 persons enumerated during the 1920 Census . CONTENTS * 1 Census questions * 2 Data availability * 3 State rankings * 4 City rankings * 5 Notes * 6 External links CENSUS QUESTIONSDCC bbb The 1930 Census collected the following information: * address * name * relationship to head of family* home owned or rented * if owned, value of home * if rented, monthly rent * whether owned a radio set * whether on a farm * sex * race * age * marital status and, if married, age at first marriage * school attendance * literacy * birthplace of person, and their parents* if foreign born: * language spoken at home before coming to the U
[...More...]

"1930 United States Census" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

1920 United States Census
The FOURTEENTH UNITED STATES CENSUS , conducted by the Census Bureau one month from January 5, 1920, determined the resident population of the United States to be 106,021,537, an increase of 15.0 percent over the 92,228,496 persons enumerated during the 1910 Census . Despite the constitutional requirement that House seats be reapportioned to the states respective of their population every ten years according to the census, members of Congress failed to agree on a reapportionment plan following this census, and the distribution of seats from the 1910 census remained in effect until 1933. In 1929, Congress passed the Reapportionment Act of 1929 which provided for a permanent method of reapportionment and fixed the number of Representatives at 435
[...More...]

"1920 United States Census" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

1940 United States Census
The SIXTEENTH UNITED STATES CENSUS , conducted by the Census Bureau , determined the resident population of the United States to be 132,164,569, an increase of 7.3 percent over the 1930 population of 123,202,624 people. The census date of record was April 1, 1940. A number of new questions were asked including where people were 5 years before, highest educational grade achieved, and information about wages. This census introduced sampling techniques; one in 20 people were asked additional questions on the census form. Other innovations included a field test of the census in 1939
[...More...]

"1940 United States Census" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

1950 United States Census
The SEVENTEENTH UNITED STATES CENSUS , conducted by the Census Bureau , determined the resident population of the United States to be 150,697,361, an increase of 14.5 percent over the 131,669,275 persons enumerated during the 1940 Census . CONTENTS * 1 Census questions * 2 Data availability * 3 State rankings * 4 City rankings * 5 References * 6 External links CENSUS QUESTIONSThe 1950 census collected the following information from all respondents: * address * whether house is on a farm * name * relationship to head of household * race * sex * age * marital status * birthplace * if foreign born, whether naturalized * employment status * hours worked in week * occupation, industry and class of workerIn addition, a sample of individuals were asked additional questions covering income, marital history, fertility, and other topics
[...More...]

"1950 United States Census" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

1960 United States Census
The EIGHTEENTH UNITED STATES CENSUS , conducted by the Census Bureau , determined the resident population of the United States to be 179,323,175, an increase of 18.5 percent over the 151,325,798 persons enumerated during the 1950 Census . CONTENTS * 1 Data availability * 2 State rankings * 3 City rankings * 4 Notes * 5 External links DATA AVAILABILITYMicrodata from the 1960 census are freely available through the Integrated Public Use Microdata Series . Aggregate data for small areas, together with electronic boundary files, can be downloaded from the National Historical Geographic Information System . Personally identifiable information will be available in 2032
[...More...]

"1960 United States Census" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

1910 United States Census
The THIRTEENTH UNITED STATES CENSUS , conducted by the Census Bureau on April 15, 1910, determined the resident population of the United States to be 92,228,496, an increase of 21.0 percent over the 76,212,168 persons enumerated during the 1900 Census . The 1910 Census switched from a portrait page orientation to a landscape orientation
[...More...]

"1910 United States Census" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

1900 United States Census
The TWELFTH UNITED STATES CENSUS , conducted by the Census Office on June 1, 1900, determined the resident population of the United States to be 76,212,168, an increase of 21.0 percent over the 62,979,766 persons enumerated during the 1890 Census
[...More...]

"1900 United States Census" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Atlanta
ATLANTA is the capital of and the most populous city in the U.S. state of Georgia , with an estimated 2016 population of 472,522. Atlanta
Atlanta
is the cultural and economic center of the Atlanta metropolitan area , home to 5,710,795 people and the ninth-largest metropolitan area in the United States. Atlanta
Atlanta
is the county seat of Fulton County , and a small portion of the city extends eastward into DeKalb County . In 1837, Atlanta
Atlanta
was founded at the intersection of two railroad lines, and the city rose from the ashes of the American Civil War
American Civil War
to become a national center of commerce
[...More...]

"Atlanta" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Birmingham, Alabama
BIRMINGHAM (/ˈbɜːrmɪŋhæm/ BUR-ming-ham ) is the most populous city in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Alabama
Alabama
and the county seat of Jefferson County . The city's population was 212,237 in the 2010 United States Census . In the 2010 US Census, the Birmingham-Hoover Metropolitan Statistical Area had a population of about 1,128,047, which is approximately one-quarter of Alabama's population. Birmingham
Birmingham
was founded in 1871, during the post-Civil War Reconstruction period , through the merger of three pre-existing farm towns, notably, former Elyton . It was named for Birmingham
Birmingham
, England, the UK's second largest city and then major industrial city
[...More...]

"Birmingham, Alabama" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

United States Census Bureau
The UNITED STATES CENSUS BUREAU (USCB; officially the BUREAU OF THE CENSUS, as defined in Title 13 U.S.C. § 11) is a principal agency of the U.S. Federal Statistical System , responsible for producing data about the American people and economy . The Census
Census
Bureau is part of the U.S. Department of Commerce
Department of Commerce
and its director is appointed by the President of the United States
United States
. The Census
Census
Bureau's primary mission is conducting the U.S. Census every ten years, which allocates the seats of the U.S. House of Representatives to the states based on their population. The Bureau's various censuses and surveys help allocate over $400 billion in federal funds every year and it helps states , local communities, and businesses make informed decisions
[...More...]

"United States Census Bureau" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

1890 United States Census
The ELEVENTH UNITED STATES CENSUS was taken beginning June 2, 1890. It determined the resident population of the United States
United States
to be 62,979,766—an increase of 25.5 percent over the 50,189,209 persons enumerated during the 1880 census. The data was tabulated by machine for the first time. The data reported that the distribution of the population had resulted in the disappearance of the American frontier . Most of the 1890 census materials were destroyed in a 1921 fire and fragments of the US census population schedule exist only for the states of Alabama, District of Columbia, Georgia, Illinois, Minnesota, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, South Dakota, and Texas
[...More...]

"1890 United States Census" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

1970 United States Census
The NINETEENTH UNITED STATES CENSUS , conducted by the Census Bureau , determined the resident population of the United States to be 203,392,031, an increase of 13.4 percent over the 179,323,175 persons enumerated during the 1960 Census . CONTENTS * 1 Data availability * 2 State rankings * 3 City rankings * 4 Conclusions * 5 Notes * 6 External links DATA AVAILABILITYMicrodata from the 1970 census are freely available through the Integrated Public Use Microdata Series . Aggregate data for small areas, together with electronic boundary files, can be downloaded from the National Historical Geographic Information System . These data were originally created and disseminated by DUALabs . Personally identifiable information will be available in 2042
[...More...]

"1970 United States Census" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

1980 United States Census
The TWENTIETH UNITED STATES CENSUS , conducted by the Census Bureau , determined the resident population of the United States to be 226,545,805, an increase of 11.4 percent over the 203,184,772 persons enumerated during the 1970 Census . CONTENTS * 1 Census questions * 2 Data availability * 3 State rankings * 4 City rankings * 5 References * 6 External links CENSUS QUESTIONSThe 1980 census collected the following information from all respondents: * Address * Name * Household relationship * Sex * Race * Age * Marital status * Whether of Spanish/Hispanic origin or descentIt was the first census not to ask for the name of the "head of household." Approximately 16 percent of households received a "long form" of the 1980 census, which contained over 100 questions. Full documentation on the 1980 census, including census forms and a procedural history, is available from the Integrated Public Use Microdata Series
[...More...]

"1980 United States Census" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Asian (U.S. Census)
RACE AND ETHNICITY IN THE UNITED STATES CENSUS, defined by the federal Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and the United States Census Bureau , are self-identification data items in which residents choose the race or races with which they most closely identify, and indicate whether or not they are of Hispanic or Latino origin (the only categories for ethnicity ). The racial categories represent a social-political construct for the race or races that respondents consider themselves to be and, "generally reflect a social definition of race recognized in this country." OMB defines the concept of race as outlined for the U.S. Census as not "scientific or anthropological" and takes into account "social and cultural characteristics as well as ancestry", using "appropriate scientific methodologies" that are not "primarily biological or genetic in reference." The race categories include both racial and national-origin groups
[...More...]

"Asian (U.S. Census)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Native American (U.S. Census)
RACE AND ETHNICITY IN THE UNITED STATES CENSUS, defined by the federal Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and the United States Census Bureau , are self-identification data items in which residents choose the race or races with which they most closely identify, and indicate whether or not they are of Hispanic or Latino origin (the only categories for ethnicity ). The racial categories represent a social-political construct for the race or races that respondents consider themselves to be and, "generally reflect a social definition of race recognized in this country." OMB defines the concept of race as outlined for the U.S. Census as not "scientific or anthropological" and takes into account "social and cultural characteristics as well as ancestry", using "appropriate scientific methodologies" that are not "primarily biological or genetic in reference." The race categories include both racial and national-origin groups
[...More...]

"Native American (U.S. Census)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.