HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Brasenose College, Oxford
Brasenose College (BNC), officially The King's Hall and College of Brasenose, is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. It was founded in 1509, with the College library and current chapel added in the mid-17th century
[...More...]

"Brasenose College, Oxford" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Rhodes Scholar
The Rhodes Scholarship, named after the Anglo-South African mining magnate and politician Cecil John Rhodes, is an international postgraduate award for students to study at the University of Oxford.[1] It is widely considered to be one of the world's most prestigious scholarships.[2] Established in 1902, it was the first large-scale programme of international scholarships,[3] inspiring the creation of a great many other awards across the globe (such as the Fulbright
Fulbright
program, Marshall Scholarship, and the Gates Cambridge Scholarship). As elaborated on in his will, Cecil Rhodes' go
[...More...]

"Rhodes Scholar" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Stamford, Lincolnshire
Stamford is a town on the River Welland
River Welland
in Lincolnshire, England, 92 miles (148 km) north of London
London
on the A1
[...More...]

"Stamford, Lincolnshire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Lord Curzon
George Nathaniel Curzon, 1st Marquess Curzon of Kedleston, KG, GCSI, GCIE, PC, FBA (11 January 1859 – 20 March 1925), known as Lord Curzon of Kedleston
Kedleston
between 1898 and 1911 and as Earl Curzon of Kedleston
Kedleston
between 1911 and 1921, and commonly as Lord Curzon, was a British Conservative statesman. Curzon was Viceroy of India
Viceroy of India
from 1899 to 1905, during which time he created the territory of Eastern Bengal and Assam. After returning to Britain, he served as Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs
Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs
from 1919 to 1924. In the negotiations after World War I, he proposed the Curzon Line, which later became the border between Poland and the Soviet Union. Curzon was passed over as Prime Minister in 1923 in favour of Stanley Baldwin
[...More...]

"Lord Curzon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

First World War
Allied victoryCentral Powers' victory on the Eastern Front nullified by defeat on the Western Front Fall of the German, Russian, Ottoman, and Austro-Hungarian empires Russian Civil War
Russian Civil War
and foundation of the Soviet Union Formation of new countries in Europe
Europe
and the Middle East Transfer of German colonies
German colonies
and regions of the former Ottoman Empire to other powers Establishment of the League of Nations
[...More...]

"First World War" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Layperson
A layperson (also layman or laywoman) is a person who is not qualified in a given profession and/or does not have specific knowledge of a certain subject. In religious organizations, the laity consists of all members who are not members of the clergy, usually including any non-ordained members of religious institutes, e.g. a nun or lay brother.[1][2] In Christian
Christian
cultures, the term lay priest was sometimes used in the past to refer to a secular priest, a diocesan priest who is not a member of a religious institute.[citation needed] The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints uses the term "Lay Priesthood" to emphasise that local congregational leaders are unpaid
[...More...]

"Layperson" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

All Saints Church, Oxford
All Saints Church is on the north side of the High Street in central Oxford, England, on the corner of Turl Street. It is now the library of Lincoln College.[1] This former church is Grade I listed.Contents1 History 2 Library 3 Headington 4 References 5 Further reading 6 GalleryHistory[edit] The original All Saints Church was founded in 1122 on this site.[2] However, on 8 March 1700, the spire of the church collapsed, destroying most of the building. There was an appeal for funds and the current building, seating 350, was completed in 1720. The building was designed by Henry Aldrich, the Dean of Christ Church. Nicholas Hawksmoor is thought to be responsible for the tower and spire. Four of the original bells survived the collapse
[...More...]

"All Saints Church, Oxford" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

English Civil War
Parliamentarian victoryExecution of King Charles I Exile of Charles II Establishment of the republican Commonwealth under Oliver CromwellBelligerentsEnglish, Scottish, Welsh and Irish Royalists English, Scottish, Welsh and Irish ParliamentariansCommanders and leadersKing Charles I   Prince Rupert
Prince Rupert
of the Rhine Charles IIEarl of Essex Thomas Fairfax Oliver CromwellCasualties and losses50,000[1] 34,000[1]127,000 noncombat deaths (including some 40,000 civilians)[a]v t eEnglish Civil WarFirst Second ThirdThe English Civil War
English Civil War
(1642–1651) was a series of armed conflicts and political machinations between Parliamentarians ("Roundheads") and Royalists ("Cavaliers") over, principally, the manner of England's government
[...More...]

"English Civil War" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cavalier
The term Cavalier
Cavalier
(/ˌkævəˈlɪər/) was first used by Roundheads as a term of abuse for the wealthier Royalist supporters of King Charles I and his son Charles II of England
Charles II of England
during the English Civil War, the Interregnum, and the Restoration (1642 – c. 1679). It was later adopted by the Royalists themselves. Although it referred originally to political and social attitudes and behaviour, of which clothing was a very small part, it has subsequently become strongly identified with the fashionable clothing of the court at the time
[...More...]

"Cavalier" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Bishop Of Lincoln
The Bishop of Lincoln
Bishop of Lincoln
is the ordinary of the Church of England
Church of England
Diocese of Lincoln in the Province of Canterbury. The present diocese covers the county of Lincolnshire
Lincolnshire
and the unitary authority areas of North Lincolnshire
Lincolnshire
and North East Lincolnshire. The bishop's seat (cathedra) is located in the Cathedral
Cathedral
Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary in the city of Lincoln. The cathedral was originally a minster church founded around 653 and refounded as a cathedral in 1072
[...More...]

"Bishop Of Lincoln" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Turl Street
Turl Street
Turl Street
is an historic street in central Oxford, England.[1][2][3]Contents1 Location 2 History 3 Commerce 4 Miscellaneous 5 Gallery 6 ReferencesLocation[edit] The street is located in the city centre, linking Broad Street at the north and High Street at the south. It intersects with Brasenose Lane to the east, and Market Street and Ship Street to the west
[...More...]

"Turl Street" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cheshire
Cheshire
Cheshire
(/ˈtʃɛʃər/ CHESH-ər, /-ɪər/ -eer;[2] archaically the County Palatine of Chester)[3] is a county in North West England, bordering Merseyside
Merseyside
and Greater Manchester
Greater Manchester
to the north, Derbyshire to the east, Staffordshire
Staffordshire
and Shropshire
Shropshire
to the south and Flintshire, Wales
Wales
to the west. Cheshire's county town is Chester; the largest town is Warrington.[4] Other major towns include Congleton, Crewe, Ellesmere Port, Macclesfield, Northwich, Runcorn, Widnes, Wilmslow, and Winsford.[5][6] The county covers 905 square miles (2,344 km2) and has a population of around 1 million
[...More...]

"Cheshire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Lancashire
Lancashire
Lancashire
(/ˈlæŋkəʃər/ LANG-kə-shər, /-ʃɪər/ -sheer or, locally, [ˈɫaŋkɪʃə(ɻ)];[2] abbreviated Lancs.) is a county in north west England. The county town is Lancaster although the administrative centre is Preston. The county has a population of 1,449,300 and an area of 1,189 square miles (3,080 km2). People from Lancashire
Lancashire
are known as Lancastrians. The history of Lancashire
Lancashire
begins with its founding in the 12th century. In the Domesday Book
Domesday Book
of 1086, some of its lands were treated as part of Yorkshire. The land that lay between the Ribble and Mersey, Inter Ripam et Mersam, was included in the returns for Cheshire
[...More...]

"Lancashire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Quadrangle (architecture)
In architecture, a quadrangle (or colloquially, a quad) is a space or courtyard, usually rectangular (square or oblong) in plan, the sides of which are entirely or mainly occupied by parts of a large building (or several smaller buildings). The word is probably most closely associated with college or university campus architecture, but quadrangles are also found in other buildings such as palaces. Most quadrangles are open-air, though a few have been roofed over (often with glass), to provide additional space for social meeting areas or coffee shops for students. The word quadrangle was originally synonymous with quadrilateral, but this usage is now relatively uncommon.[1] Some modern quadrangles resemble cloister gardens of medieval monasteries, called garths, which were usually square or rectangular, enclosed by covered arcades or cloisters
[...More...]

"Quadrangle (architecture)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cloister
A cloister (from Latin
Latin
claustrum, "enclosure") is a covered walk, open gallery, or open arcade running along the walls of buildings and forming a quadrangle or garth
[...More...]

"Cloister" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
[...More...]

"Geographic Coordinate System" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.