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Bradshaw Rock Paintings
Bradshaw rock paintings, Bradshaw rock art, Bradshaw figures or The Bradshaws, are terms used to describe one of the two major regional traditions of rock art found in the north-west Kimberley region of Western Australia.[1] The identity of who painted these figures and the age of the art are contended within archaeology and amongst Australian rock art researchers.[2] These aspects have been debated since the works were first discovered and recorded by pastoralist Joseph Bradshaw in 1891, after whom they were named.[3] As the Kimberley is home to various Aboriginal language groups, the rock art is referred to and known by many different Aboriginal names, the most common of which are Gwion Gwion[4] or Giro Giro.[5] The art consists primarily of human figures ornamented with accessories such as bags, tassels and headdresses.[6]Contents1 Discovery and study 2 Bradshaw art 3 Dating3.1 Research4 Indigenous knowledge 5 Controversies5.1 Exotic or local artis
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George Bradshaw
George Bradshaw
George Bradshaw
(29 July 1800 – 6 September 1853) was an English cartographer, printer and publisher. He developed Bradshaw's Guide, a widely sold series of combined railway guides and timetables.Contents1 Biography 2 Bradshaw's railway guides 3 Great British Railway Journeys/Great Continental Railway Journeys 4 See also 5 Sources 6 References6.1 Sources 6.2 Bibliography7 External linksBiography[edit] Bradshaw was born at Windsor Bridge, Pendleton, in Salford, Lancashire. On leaving school he was apprenticed to an engraver named Beale in Manchester, and in 1820 he set up his own engraving business in Belfast, returning to Manchester
Manchester
in 1822 to set up as an engraver and printer, principally of maps. [1] He was a religious man. Although his parents were not exceptionally wealthy, when he was young they enabled him to take lessons from a minister devoted to the teachings of Emanuel Swedenborg
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Symbiosis
Symbiosis
Symbiosis
(from Greek συμβίωσις "living together", from σύν "together" and βίωσις "living")[2] is any type of a close and long-term biological interaction between two different biological organisms, be it mutualistic, commensalistic, or parasitic. The organisms, each termed a symbiont, may be of the same or of different species. In 1879, Heinrich Anton de Bary defined it as "the living together of unlike organisms"
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Neuroscience
Neuroscience
Neuroscience
(or neurobiology) is the scientific study of the nervous system.[1] It is a multidisciplinary branch of biology,[2] that deals with the anatomy, biochemistry, molecular biology, and physiology of neurons and neural circuits. It also draws upon other fields, with the most obvious being pharmacology, psychology, and medicine.[3][4][5][6][7][8] The scope of neuroscience has broadened over time to include different approaches used to study the molecular, cellular, developmental, structural, functional, evolutionary, computational, psychosocial and medical aspects of the nervous system. Neuroscience
Neuroscience
has also given rise to such other disciplines as neuroeducation,[9] neuroethics, and neurolaw. The techniques used by neuroscientists have also expanded enormously, from molecular and cellular studies of individual neurons to imaging of sensory and motor tasks in the brain
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Spear
A spear is a pole weapon consisting of a shaft, usually of wood, with a pointed head. The head may be simply the sharpened end of the shaft itself, as is the case with fire hardened spears, or it may be made of a more durable material fastened to the shaft, such as flint, obsidian, iron, steel or bronze. The most common design for hunting or combat spears since ancient times has incorporated a metal spearhead shaped like a triangle, lozenge, or leaf. The heads of fishing spears usually feature barbs or serrated edges. The word spear comes from the Old English spere, from the Proto-Germanic speri, from a Proto-Indo-European root *sper- "spear, pole". Spears can be divided into two broad categories: those designed for thrusting in melee combat and those designed for throwing (usually referred to as javelins). The spear has been used throughout human history both as a hunting and fishing tool and as a weapon
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Clothespin
A clothespin (US English), or clothes peg (UK English) is a fastener used to hang up clothes for drying, usually on a clothes line. Clothespins often come in many different designs.Contents1 Design 2 Other uses2.1 May 6 celebrations 2.2 Public art 2.3 Filmmaking 2.4 Lutherie 2.5 Frequency control at radio-control model flying/operation sites3 References 4 External linksDesign[edit]A one-piece wooden clothespinPlastic clothespinNot to be confused with the one-piece wooden clothes-peg for hanging up coats that was invented by the Shaker
Shaker
community in the 1700s. During the 1700s laundry was hung on bushes, limbs or lines to dry but no clothespins can be found in any painting or prints of the era
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Palaeontology
Paleontology
Paleontology
or palaeontology (/ˌpeɪliɒnˈtɒlədʒi, ˌpæli-, -ən-/) is the scientific study of life that existed prior to, and sometimes including, the start of the Holocene
Holocene
Epoch (roughly 11,700 years before present). It includes the study of fossils to determine organisms' evolution and interactions with each other and their environments (their paleoecology). Paleontological observations have been documented as far back as the 5th century BC. The science became established in the 18th century as a result of Georges Cuvier's work on comparative anatomy, and developed rapidly in the 19th century. The term itself originates from Greek παλαιός, palaios, "old, ancient", ὄν, on (gen
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Thylacine
The thylacine (/ˈθaɪləsiːn/ THY-lə-seen,[11] or /ˈθaɪləsaɪn/ THY-lə-syne,[12] also /ˈθaɪləsɪn/;[13] Thylacinus
Thylacinus
cynocephalus) was the largest known carnivorous marsupial of modern times. It is commonly known as the Tasmanian tiger (because of its striped lower back) or the Tasmanian wolf.[14] Native to continental Australia, Tasmania, and New Guinea, it is believed to have become extinct in the 20th century. It was the last extant member of its family, Thylacinidae; specimens of other members of the family have been found in the fossil record dating back to the late Oligocene. Surviving evidence suggests that it was a relatively shy, nocturnal creature with the general appearance of a medium-to-large-size dog, except for its stiff tail and abdominal pouch (reminiscent of a kangaroo) and dark transverse stripes that radiated from the top of its back, similar to those of a tiger
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Wand
WAND
WAND
is an NBC-affiliated television station licensed to Decatur, Illinois, United States
United States
and serving the Central Illinois
Illinois
region. It broadcasts a high definition digital signal on virtual and UHF channel 17 from a transmitter, along I-72, between Oreana and Argenta. Owned by Block Communications, the station has studios on South Side Drive in Decatur.Contents1 History 2 Repeaters 3 Digital television3.1 Digital channels 3.2 Analog-to-digital conversion4 Newscasts4.1 Former on-air staff5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit]Its 400.5-metre (1,314 ft) tall transmitter tower (the right structure). "Listing 1009651". Antenna Structure Registration database. U.S
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Jack Pettigrew
John Douglas "Jack" Pettigrew (born 2 October 1943 in Wagga Wagga)[1] is Emeritus Professor of Physiology
Physiology
and Director of the Vision, Touch and Hearing Research Centre at the University of Queensland
University of Queensland
in Australia. Professor Pettigrew's research interest is in comparative neuroscience. He has studied a variety of different birds and mammals with modern neural tracing techniques to unravel principles of brain organization. He was the chief proponent of the Flying primates theory, which was based on the similarity between the brains of megabats and primates. Special
Special
emphasis is placed on the visual, auditory and somatosensory systems.[2] Professor Pettigrew was the first person to clarify the neurobiological basis of stereopsis when he described neurones sensitive to binocular disparity
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Quill
A quill pen is a writing implement made from a moulted flight feather (preferably a primary wing-feather) of a large bird. Quills were used for writing with ink before the invention of the dip pen, the metal-nibbed pen, the fountain pen, and, eventually, the ballpoint pen. The hand-cut goose quill is rarely used as a calligraphy tool, because many papers are now derived from wood pulp and wear down the quill very quickly. However, it is still the tool of choice for a few scribes who noted that quills provide an unmatched sharp stroke as well as greater flexibility than a steel pen.Contents1 Description 2 Sources 3 Uses 4 History 5 Today 6 Music 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksDescription[edit] In a carefully prepared quill the slit does not widen through wetting and drying with ink. It will retain its shape adequately and only requires infrequent sharpening and can be used time and time again until there is little left of it
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Last Glacial Maximum
In the Earth's climate history the Last Glacial Maximum
Last Glacial Maximum
(LGM) was the last time period during the last glacial period when ice sheets were at their greatest extension. Vast ice sheets covered much of North America, northern Europe, and Asia. The ice sheets profoundly affected Earth's climate by causing drought, desertification, and a dramatic drop in sea levels.[1] Growth of the ice sheets reached its maximum at about 26.5 kBP. Deglaciation commenced in the Northern Hemisphere at approximately 20 kBP and in Antarctica
Antarctica
approximately at 14.5 kBP, which is consistent with evidence that it was the primary source for an abrupt rise in the sea level at about 14.5 kBP.[2] The LGM is referred to in Britain as the Dimlington Stadial i
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Accelerator Mass Spectrometry
Accelerator mass spectrometry
Accelerator mass spectrometry
(AMS) is a form of mass spectrometry that accelerates ions to extraordinarily high kinetic energies before mass analysis. The special strength of AMS among the mass spectrometric methods is its power to separate a rare isotope from an abundant neighboring mass ("abundance sensitivity", e.g. 14C from 12C).[1] The method suppresses molecular isobars completely and in many cases can separate atomic isobars (e.g. 14N from 14C) also. This makes possible the detection of naturally occurring, long-lived radio-isotopes such as 10Be, 36Cl, 26Al and 14C. Their typical isotopic abundance ranges from 10−12 to 10−18
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Optically Stimulated Luminescence
In physics, optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) is a method for measuring doses from ionizing radiation. It is used in at least two applications:luminescence dating of ancient materials: mainly geological sediments and sometimes fired pottery, bricks etc., although in the latter case thermoluminescence dating is used more often radiation dosimetry, which is the measurement of accumulated radiation dose in the tissues of health care, nuclear, research and other workers, as well as in building materials in regions of nuclear disasterThe method makes use of electrons trapped between the valence and conduction bands in the crystalline structure of certain minerals (most commonly quartz and feldspar).[1] The trapping sites are imperfections of the lattice — impurities or defects. The ionizing radiation produces electron-hole pairs: Electrons are in the conduction band and holes in the valence band
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