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Braddock Expedition
 France New FranceNative Americans Great Britain British AmericaCommanders and leaders Daniel Liénard de Beaujeu † Jean-Daniel Dumas Charles de Langlade Edward Braddock † George Washington Thomas GageStrength637 natives, 108 regulars 146 provincials[1] 2,100 regulars and militia 10 cannon[1][2][3]Casualties and losses30 killed 57 wounded[4] 500+ killed[1] 450+ wounded[5] Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
Historical MarkerDesignated November 3, 1961[6]v t eSeven Years' War in North America: The French and In
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Lenape
The Lenape
Lenape
(English: /ləˈnɑːpi/ or /ˈlɛnəpi/),[8] also called the Leni Lenape,[9] Lenni Lenape
Lenape
and Delaware
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Fort Niagara
French and Indian War The Pontiac Rebellion Bradstreet's Expedition The War of 1812Garrison informationPast commanders John W. Heavey
John W. Heavey
(1916–1917) Fort Niagara
Fort Niagara
is a fortification originally built to protect the interests of New France
New France
in North America. It is located near Youngstown, New York, on the eastern bank of the Niagara River
Niagara River
at its mouth, on Lake Ontario.Contents1 Origin 2 British control 3 Later use 4 Today 5 Hauntings 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksOrigin[edit] René-Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle
René-Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle
built the first structure, called Fort Conti, in 1678. In 1687, the Governor of New France, the Marquis de Denonville, constructed a new fort at the former site of Fort Conti
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Reconnaissance
Reconnaissance
Reconnaissance
(US Army FM 7-92; Chap. 4)In military operations, reconnaissance or scouting is the exploration outside an area occupied by friendly forces to gain information about natural features and enemy presence. Examples of reconnaissance include patrolling by troops (skirmishers, Long Range Reconnaissance
Reconnaissance
Patrol, U.S. Army Rangers, cavalry scouts, or military intelligence specialists), ships or submarines, manned/unmanned reconnaissance aircraft, satellites, or by setting up covert observation posts
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Battle Of The Trough
The Battle of the Trough (March or April 1756) was a skirmish of the early French and Indian War
French and Indian War
(1754–63) fought between Native Americans and British settlers in the valley of the South Branch Potomac River in what is now northern Hardy County, West Virginia,[1] USA.[2][3]Contents1 Background 2 Battle 3 Aftermath 4 ReferencesBackground[edit] After the defeat of General Edward Braddock
Edward Braddock
at the Battle of the Monongahela (9 July 1755), the white settlers of the Allegheny Mountains were largely unprotected from a series of Shawnee
Shawnee
and Delaware Indian raids. In October, in an effort to provide some respite, two forts were raised in the North Branch Valley on Patterson Creek
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Battle Of Sideling Hill
The Battle of Sideling Hill was an engagement between Pennsylvania colonial militia and a band of Native Americans that had recently attacked Fort McCord and taken a number of colonial settlers captive. On April 1, 1756, a band of Delawares, probably under the command of either Captain Jacobs or Shingas, stormed Fort McCord in western Pennsylvania, where they captured or killed 27 settlers. In response to the raid, three bands of militia were sent in pursuit. Captain Alexander Culbertson's company, numbering about 50, caught up with the Delawares three days later
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Battle Of Great Cacapon
The Battle of Great Cacapon — also known as Mercer's Massacre — was fought on April 18, 1756[2] between members of Colonel George Washington's Virginia Regiment and French-allied Shawnee and Delaware Indians. Captain Mercer and a company of his men were pursuing some Indians when they were ambushed by a larger number of Indian raiders. Mercer and at least 16 of his men were killed.Contents1 Background 2 Battle 3 References 4 External linksBackground[edit] Main article: French and Indian War Following the outbreak of the French and Indian War in 1754, and the failure of British General Edward Braddock's expedition in 1755, French commanders in the Ohio Country encouraged their Indian allies to raid British colonial settlements. Northwestern Virginia (an area including what is now the state of West Virginia) was one area subjected to frequent Indian raids
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Maryland
Motto(s): Fatti maschii, parole femine (English: Strong Deeds, Gentle Words)[3] The Latin text encircling the seal: Scuto bonæ voluntatis tuæ coronasti nos (With favor Wilt Thou Compass Us as with a Shield) Psalm 5:12[4]State song(s): "Maryland, My Maryland"Official language None (English, de facto)Demonym MarylanderCapital AnnapolisLargest city BaltimoreLargest metro Baltimore- Washington Metro
Washington Metro
AreaArea Ranked 42nd • Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km2) • Width 196 miles (315 km) • Length 119 m
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Aide-de-camp
An aide-de-camp (UK: /ˌeɪddəˈkɒ̃/, US: /-ˈkæmp/;[1] French expression meaning literally helper in the [military] camp) is a personal assistant or secretary to a person of high rank, usually a senior military, police or government officer, a member of a royal family, or a head of state. This is not to be confused with an adjutant, who is the senior administrator of a military unit. The first aide-de-camp is typically the foremost personal aide. In some countries, the aide-de-camp is considered to be a title of honour (which confers the post-nominal letters ADC or A de C), and participates at ceremonial functions. The badge of office for an aide-de-camp is usually the aiguillette, a braided cord in gold or other colours, worn on the shoulder of a uniform
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British North America
 United StatesThe term "British North America" refers to the former territories of the British Empire
British Empire
in mainland North America
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Allegheny River
The Allegheny River
River
(/ˌæləˈɡeɪni/ AL-ə-GAY-nee) is a principal tributary of the Ohio River; it is located in the Eastern United States. The Allegheny River
River
joins with the Monongahela River
Monongahela River
to form the Ohio River
Ohio River
at the "Point" of Point State Park
Point State Park
in Downtown Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
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Great Britain
Great Britain, also known as Britain, is a large island in the north Atlantic Ocean off the northwest coast of continental Europe. With an area of 209,331 km2 (80,823 sq mi), Great Britain is the largest of the British Isles, the largest European island, and the ninth-largest island in the world.[5][note 1] In 2011 the island had a population of about 61 million people, making it the world's third-most populous island after Java in Indonesia and Honshu in Japan.[7][8] The island of Ireland is situated to the west of it, and together these islands, along with over 1,000 smaller surrounding islands, form the British Isles archipelago.[9] The island is dominated by a maritime climate with quite narrow temperature differences between seasons. Politically, the island is part of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, and constitutes most of its territory.[10] Most of England, Scotland, and Wales are on the island
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France
France
France
(French: [fʁɑ̃s]), officially the French Republic (French: République française [ʁepyblik fʁɑ̃sɛz]), is a country whose territory consists of metropolitan France
France
in western Europe, as well as several overseas regions and territories.[XIII] The metropolitan area of France
France
extends from the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
to the English Channel
English Channel
and the North Sea, and from the Rhine
Rhine
to the Atlantic Ocean. The overseas territories include French Guiana
French Guiana
in South America and several islands in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans
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Militia
A militia /mɪˈlɪʃə/[1] is generally an army or some other fighting organization of non-professional soldiers, citizens of a nation, or subjects of a state, who can be called upon for military service during a time of need, as opposed to a professional force of regular, full-time military personnel, or historically, members of a warrior nobility class (e.g., knights or samurai). Generally unable to hold ground against regular forces, it is common for militias to be used for aiding regular troops by skirmishing, holding fortifications, or irregular warfare, instead of being used in offensive campaigns by themselves
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Pittsburgh
AlleghenyHistoric empires France Great BritainHistoric colonies New France Quebec VirginiaFounded November 27, 1758Municipal incorporation April 22, 1794 (Borough) March 18, 1816 (City)Founded by George Washington, General John ForbesNamed for "The Great Commoner": Prime Minister William PittGovernment • Type Mayor-Council • Mayor Bill Peduto
Bill Peduto
(D) •  City
City
CouncilCouncilmembersDarlene Harris Theresa Kail-Smith Bruce Kraus (President) Anthony Coghill Corey O'Connor Daniel Lavelle Deborah Gross Dan Gilman Rev. Ricky Burgess • State HouseRepresentativesJake Wheatley Don Walko Dominic Costa Chelsa Wagner Dan Frankel Joseph Preston, Jr. Dan Deasy Paul Costa Harry Readshaw • State Senate Wayne D. Fontana
Wayne D

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Commander-in-chief
A commander-in-chief, also sometimes called supreme commander, or chief commander, is the person or body that exercises supreme operational command and control of a nation's military forces. As a technical term, it refers to military competencies that reside in a nation-state's executive leadership—a head of state, a head of government . Often, a given country's commander-in-chief (if held by an official) need not be or have been a commissioned officer or even a veteran
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