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Boylston (MBTA Station)
Boylston station
Boylston station
is a light rail station in Boston, Massachusetts. It serves the MBTA
MBTA
Green Line system, and is located on the southeast corner of Boston Common
Boston Common
at the intersection of Boylston Street
Boylston Street
and Tremont Street. Boylston opened along with Park Street in 1897 as the first subway stations in North America. After more than a century of continuous operation, Boylston station
Boylston station
retains an appearance more like its original look than any other station in the MBTA
MBTA
system. Boylston station
Boylston station
serves as a stop on the bus rapid transit Silver Line, with a southbound stop at street level. Construction of a proposed underground Silver Line station at this location has been postponed indefinitely. Boylston is not handicapped accessible
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Boston, Massachusetts
Boston
Boston
(/ˈbɒstən/ ( listen) BOS-tən) is the capital city and most populous municipality[9] of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in the United States
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MBTA Accessibility
Physical accessibility on the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA or "the T") system is incomplete, with accessibility on all buses (including the Silver Line), all Orange Line stations, all but 2 Red Line stations, and all but 1 Blue Line station. As is true for most mass transit systems, much of the Boston subway
Boston subway
and commuter rail lines were built before wheelchair access was a requirement under the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. The MBTA underwent significant expansion in the 1980s and 1990s, and all of the new facilities are ADA-compliant. The MBTA has refurbished some facilities to become more compliant with the ADA. On April 4, 2006, the MBTA announced the settlement of a class-action lawsuit, Joanne Daniels-Finegold, et al. v
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Sullivan Square (MBTA Station)
In geometry, a square is a regular quadrilateral, which means that it has four equal sides and four equal angles (90-degree angles, or (100-gradian angles or right angles).[1] It can also be defined as a rectangle in which two adjacent sides have equal length
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Watertown (MBTA Station)
Watertown Carhouse is a bus maintenance facility and former streetcar carhouse located in the southern section of Watertown, Massachusetts, across the Charles River from Watertown Square. As Watertown Yard, the site also serves as a bus depot serving local and express routes, with additional connections available at Watertown Square on the opposite end of the Watertown Bridge. History[edit]A PCC streetcar (left) and a work car in Watertown Yard in 1967Watertown Carhouse in 2013In 1900, streetcar service was extended south from Watertown Square to Newton Corner, which served as a transfer point between the Boston Elevated Railway (BERy) and suburban operators
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Green Line "A" Branch
The "A" Branch or Watertown Branch was a streetcar line in the Boston, Massachusetts area, operating as a branch of the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority Green Line. In 1969 it was replaced by the 57 bus, though the tracks remained continuous until March 1994.Contents1 History1.1 Closure 1.2 Track removal 1.3 Bustitution1.3.1 Route 571.4 Express buses2 Map 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit]1967 map of branches of the newly named Green Line, showing the "A" BranchThe line started as a horse car street railway, as a branch of the Cambridge Horse Railroad. The branch split at Central Square, Cambridge, and crossed the Charles River
Charles River
on the River Street Bridge into Allston. It continued on through Union Square, and in 1858 was opened to Oak Square in the center of Brighton
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Light Rail
Light rail, light rail transit (LRT), or fast tram is a form of urban rail transport using rolling stock similar to a tramway, but operating at a higher capacity, and often on an exclusive right-of-way.Utah Transit Authority's TRAX is one of the fastest growing light rail systems in the United States.With nearly a quarter million riders served each day, Boston's MBTA Green Line is the busiest light rail system in the United States.There is no standard definition, but in the United States
United States
(where the terminology was devised in the 1970s from the en
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Bus Rapid Transit
Bus
Bus
rapid transit (BRT, BRTS, busway, transitway) is a bus-based public transport system designed to improve capacity and reliability relative to a conventional bus system.[2] Typically, a BRT system includes roadway that is dedicated to buses, and gives priority to buses at intersections where buses may interact with other traffic; alongside design features to reduce delays caused by passengers boarding or leaving buses, or purchasing fares. BRT aims to combine the capacity and speed of a metro with the flexibility, lower cost and simplicity of a bus system. The first BRT system was the Rede Integrada de Transporte
Rede Integrada de Transporte
('Integrated Transportation Network') in Curitiba, Brazil, which entered service in 1974. This inspired many similar systems around Brazil
Brazil
and the world, such as TransMilenio
TransMilenio
in Bogotá, Colombia, which opened in 2000
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Back Bay, Boston, Massachusetts
Back Bay
Bay
is an officially recognized neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts.[2] It is most famous for its rows of Victorian brownstone homes—considered one of the best preserved examples of 19th-century urban design in the United States—as well as numerous architecturally significant individual buildings, and cultural institutions such as the Boston
Boston
Public Library
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Lechmere (MBTA Station)
Lechmere is a light rail station and the present-day northern terminus of the MBTA Green Line. It is located at Lechmere Square in East Cambridge, Massachusetts near the intersection of Cambridge Street and Monsignor O'Brien Highway (Route 28). Green Line trains run around a balloon loop, inside which is a small yard used for midday and overnight storage. The station has two platforms, which are not connected within fare control; the outbound terminus is on the northeast side of the loop and the inbound platform is on the southwest side. Lechmere station is fully handicapped accessible. As part of the Green Line Extension project, the current (1922-built) Lechmere station is planned to be demolished. A new elevated station will be built on the opposite side of the O'Brien Highway. This station will be adjacent to the Northpoint development and will have a direct connection to the Somerville Community Path
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Washington Street Theatre District
The Boston Theater District is the center of Boston's theater scene.[2] Many of its theaters are on Washington Street, Tremont Street, Boylston Street, and Huntington Avenue.[3][4][5] Its shows range from Broadway shows to repertory-company productions.[6] It is small compared to New York City's Theater District, and serves as a staging area for shows on their way to Broadway.[2][4]Contents1 History 2 Revitalization 3 Washington Street Theatre District 4 Theaters 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] Plays were banned in Boston by the Puritans until 1792.[5][7] Boston's first theater opened in 1793.[8][9] In 1900, the Boston Theater District had 31 theaters, with 50,000 seats.[7] In the 1940s, the city had over 50 theaters.[2] Since the 1970s, developers have renovated old theaters.[2] Revitalization[edit] Suffolk University bought the Modern Theater in 2008
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National Historic Landmark
A National Historic Landmark
National Historic Landmark
(NHL) is a building, district, object, site, or structure that is officially recognized by the United States government for its outstanding historical significance. Of over 90,000 places listed on the country's National Register of Historic Places, only some 2,500 are recognized as National Historic Landmarks. A National Historic Landmark
National Historic Landmark
District may include contributing properties that are buildings, structures, sites or objects, and it may include non-contributing properties
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South Boston
South Boston
Boston
is a densely populated neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts, located south and east of the Fort Point Channel
Fort Point Channel
and abutting Dorchester Bay. South Boston, most popularly known as Southie, was once a predominantly working class Irish Catholic community, but has become increasingly desirable among young professionals and families. South Boston
Boston
contains Dorchester Heights, where George Washington forced British troops to evacuate during the American Revolutionary War. South Boston
Boston
has undergone gentrification, and consequently, its real estate market has seen property values join the highest in the city. South Boston
Boston
has also left its mark on history with Boston busing desegregation. South Boston
Boston
is also home to the St
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Broadway (MBTA Station)
Broadway station is a subway station in Boston, Massachusetts. It serves the MBTA's Red Line. It is located at the intersection of Dorchester Avenue and Broadway in South Boston. It was opened on December 15, 1917 as part of the Dorchester Extension of the "Cambridge Connection" from Downtown Crossing (formerly Washington station) to Andrew. The station has a single island platform to serve the two tracks
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Faregate
In rail transport, the paid area is a dedicated "inner" zone in a railway station or metro station barriers, which visitor or passenger requires a valid ticket, checked smartcard or a pass to get in. A system using paid areas is often called fare control. Passengers are allowed to enter or exit only through a faregate. A paid area usually exists in rapid transit railway stations for separating the train platform from the station exit, ensuring a passenger has paid or prepaid before reaching the platform and using any transport service. Such design requires a well-organized railway station layout. The paid area is similar in concept to the airside at an airport. However, in most cases entrance to the paid area requires only a valid ticket or transit pass. The exception is in certain cases of international rail travel, where passengers must also pass through immigration control and customs to enter the paid area. Examples include the Eurostar international platforms at St
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