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Boxcar
A BOXCAR is a North American railroad car that is enclosed and generally used to carry freight . The boxcar, while not the simplest freight car design, is probably the most versatile, since it can carry most loads. Boxcars have side doors of varying size and operation, and some include end doors and adjustable bulkheads to load very large items. Similar covered freight cars outside North America
North America
are covered goods wagons and, depending on the region, are called GOODS VAN (UK ), LOUVRE VAN ( Australia
Australia
), COVERED WAGON (UIC and UK) or simply VAN (UIC and UK). CONTENTS * 1 Use * 2 Dimensions * 3 Double door boxcar * 4 End door boxcar * 5 Hicube boxcar * 5.1 X60 class * 6 Passenger use * 7 See also * 8 References * 9 External links USE Illustration of a boxcar being unloaded by hand Boxcars can carry most kinds of freight
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Spirit Of St. Louis
The SPIRIT OF ST. LOUIS (Registration: N-X-211) is the custom-built, single engine, single-seat monoplane that was flown solo by Charles Lindbergh on May 20–21, 1927, on the first solo non-stop transatlantic flight from Long Island
Long Island
, New York , to Paris
Paris
, France
France
, for which Lindbergh won the $25,000 Orteig Prize . Lindbergh took off in the Spirit from Roosevelt Airfield , Garden City, New York , and landed 33 hours, 30 minutes later at Aéroport Le Bourget in Paris, France, a distance of approximately 3,600 miles (5,800 km). One of the best known aircraft in the world, the Spirit was built by Ryan Airlines in San Diego, California
San Diego, California
, which at the time was owned and operated by Benjamin Franklin Mahoney who had purchased it from its founder, T. Claude Ryan , in 1926
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Sliding Door
A SLIDING DOOR is a type of door which opens horizontally by sliding, usually parallel to a wall. Sliding doors can be mounted either on top of a track below or be suspended from a track above and some types 'disappear' in a wall when slid open. There are several types of sliding doors such as pocket doors , Arcadia doors , and bypass doors. Sliding doors are commonly used as shower doors, glass doors, screen doors , wardrobe doors or in vans. CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Sliding door
Sliding door
gear * 2.1 Top hung sliding doors * 2.2 Bottom rolling door gear * 2.3 Lift-and-slide door gear * 3 Automatic sliding doors * 4 Usage * 5 See also * 6 References * 7 External links HISTORYSliding doors were used as early as the first century CE in Roman houses as evidenced by archaeological finds in Pompeii
Pompeii
, Italy
Italy

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Structure Gauge
The STRUCTURE GAUGE, also called THE MINIMUM CLEARANCE OUTLINE, is the minimum height and width of tunnels and bridges as well as the minimum height and width of the doors that allow a rail siding access into a warehouse . In addition, the term may apply to the minimum distance to railway platforms (passenger or freight), buildings, electrical equipment boxes, railway signal equipment, third rails or to supports for overhead catenaries or overhead lines from the track. The width of a narrow cut can also affect the maximum loading gauge . The difference between the structure gauge and the loading gauge is called the "clearance ". The amount of clearance between the loading gauge and the structure gauge depends on the speed of the train, due to the train wobbling, so a train may be able to get past a restricted clearance by travelling at slow speed
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Railroad Museum Of Pennsylvania
PENNSYLVANIA (/ˌpɛnsɪlˈveɪniə/ ( listen ); Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
German : Pennsylvaani or Pennsilfaani), officially the COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA, is a state located in the northeastern and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States
United States
. The Appalachian Mountains run through its middle. The Commonwealth borders Delaware
Delaware
to the southeast, Maryland
Maryland
to the south, West Virginia
West Virginia
to the southwest, Ohio
Ohio
to the west, Lake Erie
Lake Erie
and the Canadian province of Ontario
Ontario
to the northwest, New York to the north, and New Jersey
New Jersey
to the east
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Prairie Du Chien, Wisconsin
PRAIRIE DU CHIEN (/ˌprɛri du ˈʃiːn/ ) is a city in and the county seat of Crawford County , Wisconsin
Wisconsin
, United States
United States
. The population was 5,911 at the 2010 census. Its Zip Code
Zip Code
is 53821. Often referred to as Wisconsin's second oldest city, Prairie du Chien was established as a European settlement by French voyageurs in the late seventeenth century. The city is located near the confluence of the Wisconsin
Wisconsin
and Mississippi Rivers , a strategic point along the Fox- Wisconsin
Wisconsin
Waterway that connects the Great Lakes
Great Lakes
with the Mississippi. Early French visitors to the site found it occupied by a group of Fox Indians led by a chief whose name Alim meant Chien in French (Dog in English ). The French explorers named the location Prairie du Chien, French for "Dog's Prairie"
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Cargo
This article NEEDS ADDITIONAL CITATIONS FOR VERIFICATION . Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources . Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (April 2014) (Learn how and when to remove this template message ) Very small freight transporter - a cargo tricycle Animals used to transport goods - Mules carrying slate roof tiles in India in 1993 In economics , CARGO or FREIGHT are goods or produce being conveyed – generally for commercial gain – by ship , boat, or aircraft , although the term is now often extended to cover all types of FREIGHT, including that carried by train , van , truck , or intermodal container . The term cargo is also used in case of goods in the cold-chain , because the perishable inventory is always in transit towards a final end-use, even when it is held in cold storage or other similar climate-controlled facility
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Circus
A CIRCUS is a company of performers who put on diverse entertainment shows that include clowns , acrobats , trained animals, trapeze acts, musicians , dancers , hoopers , tightrope walkers , jugglers , magicians , unicyclists , as well as other object manipulation and stunt-oriented artists. The term 'circus' also describes the performance which has followed various formats through its 250-year modern history. Philip Astley is credited with being the 'father' of the modern circus when he opened the first circus in 1768 in England. A skilled equestrian, Astley demonstrated trick riding, riding in a circle rather than a straight line as his rivals did, and thus chanced on the format which was later named a 'circus'. In 1770 he hired acrobats, tightrope walkers, jugglers and a clown to fill in the pauses between acts. Performances developed significantly through the next fifty years, with large-scale theatrical battle reenactments becoming a significant feature
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Midwestern United States
The MIDWESTERN UNITED STATES, also referred to as the AMERICAN MIDWEST, MIDDLE WEST, or simply the MIDWEST, is one of the four geographic regions defined by the United States Census Bureau
United States Census Bureau
, occupying the northern central part of the United States
United States
of America . It was officially named the NORTH CENTRAL REGION by the Census Bureau until 1984. It is located between the Northeastern U.S. and the Western U.S. , with Canada
Canada
to its north and the Southern U.S. to its south
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Automobile
A CAR (or AUTOMOBILE) is a wheeled motor vehicle used for transportation . Most definitions of car say they run primarily on roads, seat one to eight people, have four tires , and mainly transport people rather than goods. Cars came into global use during the 20th century, and developed economies depend on them. The year 1886 is regarded as the birth year of the modern car, when German inventor Karl Benz built his Benz Patent-Motorwagen
Benz Patent-Motorwagen
. Cars did not become widely available until the early 20th century. One of the first cars that was accessible to the masses was the 1908 Model T , an American car manufactured by the Ford Motor Company
Ford Motor Company
. Cars were rapidly adopted in the US, where they replaced animal-drawn carriages and carts, but took much longer to be accepted in Western Europe and other parts of the world
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Newsprint
NEWSPRINT is a low-cost non-archival paper consisting mainly of wood pulp and most commonly used to print newspapers and other publications and advertising material. Invented in 1844 by Charles Fenerty
Charles Fenerty
of Nova Scotia , Canada
Canada
, it usually has an off white cast and distinctive feel. It is designed for use in printing presses that employ a long web of paper (web offset , letterpress and flexographic ) rather than individual sheets of paper. Newsprint
Newsprint
is favored by publishers and printers as it is relatively low cost (compared with paper grades used for glossy magazines and sales brochures ), strong (to run through modern high-speed web printing presses) and can accept four-color printing at qualities that meet the needs of typical newspapers
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Pullman Standard
The PULLMAN CAR COMPANY, founded by George Pullman , manufactured railroad cars in the mid-to-late 19th century through the early decades of the 20th century, during the boom of railroads in the United States. Its workers initially lived in a planned worker community (or "company town ") named Pullman, Chicago . Pullman developed the sleeping car , which carried his name into the 1980s. Pullman did not just manufacture the cars: he also operated them on most of the railroads in the United States, paying railroad companies to couple the cars to trains. The labor union associated with the company, the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters , which was founded and organized by A. Philip Randolph , was one of the most powerful African-American political entities of the 20th century. The company also built thousands of streetcars and trolley buses for use in cities
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Bessemer, Alabama
BESSEMER is a city southwest of Birmingham in Jefferson County , Alabama
Alabama
, United States, eight miles (13 km) west of Hoover . The population was 27,456 at the 2010 Census
Census
. CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Geography * 2.1 Climate * 3 Government * 4 Economy * 4.1 Taxes * 5 Demographics * 6 Transportation * 7 Education * 8 Culture * 9 Media * 10 Notable people * 11 Notable animal * 12 See also * 13 References * 14 External links HISTORYThe town was founded in the postbellum era by the Bessemer Land and Improvement Company, owned by coal magnate Henry F. DeBardeleben , after he had inherited Daniel Pratt 's investments. The mayor and councilmen voted to incorporate the city of Bessemer on September 9, 1887
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War
WAR is a state of armed conflict between states or societies . It is generally characterized by extreme aggression , destruction, and mortality, using regular or irregular military forces . An absence of war is usually called "peace ". WARFARE refers to the common activities and characteristics of types of war, or of wars in general. Total war
Total war
is warfare that is not restricted to purely legitimate military targets , and can result in massive civilian or other non-combatant suffering and casualties . While some scholars see war as a universal and ancestral aspect of human nature , others argue it is a result of specific socio-cultural or ecological circumstances. The deadliest war in history, in terms of the cumulative number of deaths since its start, is World War II
World War II
, from 1939 to 1945, with 60–85 million deaths, followed by the Mongol conquests at up to 60 million
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France
FRANCE (French: ), officially the FRENCH REPUBLIC (French: République française, pronounced ), is a country whose territory consists of metropolitan France
France
in western Europe
Europe
, as well as several overseas regions and territories . The metropolitan area of France extends from the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
to the English Channel
English Channel
and the North Sea
North Sea
, and from the Rhine
Rhine
to the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
. The overseas territories include French Guiana in South America
South America
and several islands in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans
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Forty And Eight Veterans Organization
The FORTY AND EIGHT is an organization of veterans of the United States armed forces . Its official name is "La Société des Quarante Hommes et Huit Chevaux," which is French, and translates as "The Society of Forty Men and Eight Horses." The official emblem of the 40 "> 40 & 8 boxcar in Independence Day parade, Ypsilanti, Michigan The organization (also known as "La Société") can trace its roots back to 1920, when Joseph W. Breen and 15 other members of the American Legion , who were veterans of World War I
World War I
, came together and founded it as an honor society for certain Legion members. They envisioned a new and different level of elite membership and camaraderie for leaders of the American Legion. The title "40 & 8" comes from the box cars that were used to transport troops to the front in France
France

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