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Boxcar
A boxcar is a North American railroad car that is enclosed and generally used to carry freight. The boxcar, while not the simplest freight car design, is probably the most versatile, since it can carry most loads. Boxcars have side doors of varying size and operation, and some include end doors and adjustable bulkheads to load very large items. Similar covered freight cars outside North America
North America
are covered goods wagons and, depending on the region, are called goods van (UK), louvre van (Australia), covered wagon (UIC and UK) or simply van (UIC and UK).Contents1 Use 2 Dimensions 3 Double-door boxcar 4 Hicube boxcar 5 Passenger use 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksUse[edit]Illustration of a boxcar being unloaded by handBoxcars can carry most kinds of freight. Originally they were hand-loaded, but in more recent years mechanical assistance such as forklifts have been used to load and empty them faster
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Thermal Insulation
Thermal insulation
Thermal insulation
is the reduction of heat transfer (i.e. the transfer of thermal energy between objects of differing temperature) between objects in thermal contact or in range of radiative influence. Thermal insulation
Thermal insulation
can be achieved with specially engineered methods or processes, as well as with suitable object shapes and materials. Heat flow is an inevitable consequence of contact between objects of different temperature. Thermal insulation
Thermal insulation
provides a region of insulation in which thermal conduction is reduced or thermal radiation is reflected rather than absorbed by the lower-temperature body. The insulating capability of a material is measured as the inverse of thermal conductivity (k). Low thermal conductivity is equivalent to high insulating capability (Resistance value)
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Spirit Of St. Louis
The Spirit of St. Louis
Spirit of St. Louis
(Registration: N-X-211) is the custom-built, single engine, single-seat, high wing monoplane that was flown solo by Charles Lindbergh
Charles Lindbergh
on May 20 – 21, 1927, on the first solo nonstop transatlantic flight from Long Island, New York, to Paris, France, for which Lindbergh won the $25,000 Orteig Prize.[2] Lindbergh took off in the Spirit from Roosevelt Airfield, Garden City, New York, and landed 33 hours, 30 minutes later at Aéroport Le Bourget in Paris, France, a distance of approximately 3,600 miles (5,800 km).[3] One of the best-known aircraft in the world, the Spirit was built by Ryan Airlines in San Diego, California, owned and operated at the time by Benjamin Franklin Mahoney, who had purchased it from its founder, T. Claude Ryan, in 1926
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Soviet Union
The Soviet Union
Soviet Union
(Russian: Сове́тский Сою́з, tr. Sovétsky Soyúz, IPA: [sɐˈvʲɛt͡skʲɪj sɐˈjus] ( listen)), officially the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (Russian: Сою́з Сове́тских Социалисти́ческих Респу́блик, tr. Soyúz Sovétskikh Sotsialistícheskikh Respúblik, IPA: [sɐˈjus sɐˈvʲɛtskʲɪx sətsɨəlʲɪsˈtʲitɕɪskʲɪx rʲɪˈspublʲɪk] ( listen)), abbreviated as the USSR (Russian: СССР, tr. SSSR), was a socialist state in Eurasia
Eurasia
that existed from 1922 to 1991. Nominally a union of multiple national Soviet republics,[a] its government and economy were highly centralized. The country was a one-party state, governed by the Communist Party with Moscow
Moscow
as its capital in its largest republic, the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic
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Circus
A circus is a company of performers who put on diverse entertainment shows that include clowns, acrobats, trained animals, trapeze acts, musicians, dancers, hoopers, tightrope walkers, jugglers, magicians, unicyclists, as well as other object manipulation and stunt-oriented artists. The term 'circus' also describes the performance which has followed various formats through its 250-year modern history. Philip Astley is credited with being the 'father' of the modern circus when he opened the first circus in 1768 in England. A skilled equestrian, Astley demonstrated trick riding, riding in a circle rather than a straight line as his rivals did, and thus chanced on the format which was later named a 'circus'. In 1770 he hired acrobats, tightrope walkers, jugglers and a clown to fill in the pauses between acts. Performances developed significantly through the next fifty years, with large-scale theatrical battle reenactments becoming a significant feature
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Midwestern United States
The Midwestern United States, also referred to as the American Midwest, Middle West, or simply the Midwest, is one of four geographic regions defined by the United States
United States
Census Bureau. It occupies the northern central part of the United States
United States
of America.[2] It was officially named the North Central region by the Census Bureau until 1984.[3] It is located between the Northeastern U.S.
Northeastern U.S.
and the Western U.S., with Canada
Canada
to its north and the Southern U.S.
Southern U.S.
to its south. The Census Bureau's definition consists of 12 states in the north central United States: Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin
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Automobile
A car (or automobile) is a wheeled motor vehicle used for transportation. Most definitions of car say they run primarily on roads, seat one to eight people, have four tires, and mainly transport people rather than goods.[2][3] Cars came into global use during the 20th century, and developed economies depend on them. The year 1886 is regarded as the birth year of the modern car when German inventor Karl Benz built his Benz Patent-Motorwagen. Cars became widely available in the early 20th century. One of the first cars that were accessible to the masses was the 1908 Model T, an American car manufactured by the Ford
Ford
Motor Company. Cars were rapidly adopted in the US, where they replaced animal-drawn carriages and carts, but took much longer to be accepted in Western Europe and other parts of the world. Cars have controls for driving, parking, passenger comfort and safety, and controlling a variety of lights
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Newsprint
Newsprint
Newsprint
is a low-cost non-archival paper consisting mainly of wood pulp and most commonly used to print newspapers and other publications and advertising material
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Cargo
In economics, cargo or freight are goods or produce being conveyed – generally for commercial gain – by water, air or land. Cargo
Cargo
was originally a shipload. Cargo
Cargo
now covers all types of freight, including that carried by train, van, truck, or intermodal container.[1] The term cargo is also used in case of goods in the cold-chain, because the perishable inventory is always in transit towards a final end-use, even when it is held in cold storage or other similar climate-controlled facility. Multi-modal container units, designed as reusable carriers to facilitate unit load handling of the goods contained, are also referred to as cargo, specially by shipping lines and logistics operators. Similarly, aircraft ULD boxes are also documented as cargo, with associated packing list of the items contained within
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Prairie Du Chien, Wisconsin
Prairie du Chien (/ˌprɛri du ˈʃiːn/) is a city in and the county seat of Crawford County, Wisconsin, United States. The population was 5,911 at the 2010 census. Its Zip Code
Zip Code
is 53821.[4] Often referred to as Wisconsin's second oldest city,[5] Prairie du Chien was established as a European settlement by French voyageurs in the late seventeenth century. The city is located near the confluence of the Wisconsin
Wisconsin
and Mississippi Rivers, a strategic point along the Fox- Wisconsin
Wisconsin
Waterway that connects the Great Lakes
Great Lakes
with the Mississippi. Early French visitors to the site found it occupied by a group of Fox Indians led by a chief whose name Alim meant Chien in French (Dog in English).[6][7] The French explorers named the location Prairie du Chien, French for "Dog's Prairie"
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Sliding Door
A sliding door is a type of door which opens horizontally by sliding, usually parallel to a wall. Sliding doors can be mounted either on top of a track below or be suspended from a track above and some types 'disappear' in a wall when slid open.[1] There are several types of sliding doors such as pocket doors, Arcadia doors, and bypass doors. Sliding doors are commonly used as shower doors, glass doors, screen doors, wardrobe doors or in vans.Contents1 History 2 Sliding door
Sliding door
gear2.1 Top hung sliding doors 2.2 Bottom rolling door gear 2.3 Lift-and-slide door gear3 Automatic sliding doors 4 Usage 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] Sliding doors were used as early as the first century CE in Roman houses as evidenced by archaeological finds in Pompeii, Italy.[2][3] Sliding door
Sliding door
gear[edit] The mechanism used to operate a sliding door is called sliding door gear
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Prisoner Of War Camps
A prisoner-of-war camp is a site for the containment of enemy combatants captured by a belligerent power in time of war. There are significant differences among POW camps, internment camps, and military prisons. Purpose built prisoner-of-war camps appeared at Norman Cross in England in 1797 and HM Prison Dartmoor, both constructed during the Napoleonic Wars, and they have been in use in all the main conflicts of the last 200 years. The main camps are used for coast guards, marines, sailors, soldiers, and more recently, airmen of an enemy power who have been captured by a belligerent power during or immediately after an armed conflict
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Structure Gauge
The structure gauge, also called the minimum clearance outline, is the minimum height and width of tunnels and bridges as well as the minimum height and width of the doors that allow a rail siding access into a warehouse. In addition, the term may apply to the minimum distance to railway platforms (passenger or freight), buildings, electrical equipment boxes, railway signal equipment, third rails or to supports for overhead lines from the track. The width of a narrow cut can also affect the maximum loading gauge. The difference between the structure gauge and the loading gauge is called the "clearance"
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Nazi Germany
Coordinates: 52°31′N 13°24′E / 52.517°N 13.400°E / 52.517; 13.400 "Drittes Reich" redirects here
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Concentration Camps
Internment
Internment
is the imprisonment or confinement[1] of people, commonly in large groups, without trial. The term is especially used for the confinement "of enemy citizens in wartime or of terrorism suspects".[2] Thus, while it can simply mean imprisonment, it tends to refer to preventive confinement, rather than confinement after having been convicted of some crime. Use of these terms is subject to debate and political sensitivities.[3] Interned persons may be held in prisons or in facilities known as internment camps
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General Utility Van
A General Utility Van (GUV) is a type of rail vehicle built by British Rail and its predecessors, which was primarily used for transporting mail and parcels. They were used by both Express Parcels Systems, the British Post Office and Railtrack
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