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Box-drawing Characters
Box-drawing characters, also known as line-drawing characters, are a form of semigraphics widely used in text user interfaces to draw various geometric frames and boxes. In graphical user interfaces, these characters are much less useful as it is more simple and appropriate to draw lines and rectangles directly with graphical APIs. Box-drawing characters work only with monospaced fonts; however, they are still useful for plaintext comments on websites. Used along with box-drawing characters are block elements, shade characters, and terminal graphic characters
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Midnight Commander
GNU
GNU
Midnight Commander
Midnight Commander
(also known as mc, the command used to start it, and as mouseless commander in older versions[4]) is a free cross-platform orthodox file manager.[5] It was started by Miguel de Icaza in 1994[1] as a clone of the then-popular Norton Commander. GNU
GNU
Midnight Commander
Midnight Commander
is part of the GNU project
GNU project
and is licensed under the terms of the GNU
GNU
General Public License.[6]Contents1 Design 2 Unicode
Unicode
support 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksDesign[edit] Midnight Commander
Midnight Commander
is a console application with a text user interface. The main interface consists of two panels which display the file system
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Microcomputer
A microcomputer is a small, relatively inexpensive computer with a microprocessor as its central processing unit (CPU).[2] It includes a microprocessor, memory, and minimal input/output (I/O) circuitry mounted on a single printed circuit board.[3] Microcomputers became popular in the 1970s and 1980s with the advent of increasingly powerful microprocessors. The predecessors to these computers, mainframes and minicomputers, were comparatively much larger and more expensive (though indeed present-day mainframes such as the IBM System z machines use one or more custom microprocessors as their CPUs)
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VT100
The VT100
VT100
is a video terminal, introduced in August 1978 by Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC). It was one of the first terminals to support ANSI escape codes for cursor control and other tasks, and added a number of extended codes for special features like controlling the status lights on the keyboard. This led to rapid uptake of the ANSI standard, becoming the de facto standard for terminal emulators. The VT100s, especially the VT102, was extremely successful in the market, and made DEC the leading terminal vendor. The VT100
VT100
series was replaced by the VT200 series starting in 1983, which proved just as successful
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DEC Special Graphics
DEC Special Graphics is a 7-bit character set developed by Digital Equipment Corporation. Character set[edit]DEC Special_0 _1 _2 _3 _4 _5 _6 _7 _8 _9 _A _B _C _D _E _F  0_   NUL 0000 0 SOH 0001 1 STX 0002 2 ETX 0003 3 EOT 0004 4 ENQ 0005 5 ACK 0006 6 BEL 0007 7 BS 0008 8 HT 0009 9 LF 000A 10 VT 000B 11 FF 000C 12 CR 000D 13 SO 000E 14 SI 000F 15  1_   DLE 0010 16 DC1 0011 17 DC2 0012 18 DC3 0013 19 DC4 0014 20 NAK 0015 21 SYN 0016 22 ETB 0017 23 CAN 0018 24 EM 0019 25 SUB 001A 26 ESC 001B 27 FS 001C 28 GS 001D 29 RS 001E 30 US 001F 31  2_   SP 0020 32 ! 0021 33 " 0022 34 # 0023 35 $ 0024 36 % 0025 37 & 0026 38 ' 0027 39 ( 0028 40 ) 0029 41 * 002A 42 + 002B 43 , 002C 44 - 002D 45 . 002E 46 / 002F 47  3_   0 0030 48 1 0031 49 2 0032 50 3 0033 51 4 0034 52 5 0035 53 6 0036 54 7 0037 55 8 0038 56 9 0039 57 : 003A 58 ; 003B 59 < 003C 60 = 003D 61 > 003E 62 ? 003F 63  4_   @ 0040 64 A
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Escape Sequence
An escape sequence is a series of characters used to change the state of computers and their attached peripheral devices, rather than to be displayed or printed as regular data bytes would be. These are also known as control sequences, reflecting their use in device control, beginning with the Control Sequence Initiator - originally the "Escape character" ASCII
ASCII
code - character 27 (decimal) - often written "Esc" on keycaps. With the introduction of ANSI terminals most escape sequences began with the two characters "ESC" then "[" or a specially-allocated CSI character with a code 155 (decimal)
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Bash (Unix Shell)
Bash is a Unix shell
Unix shell
and command language written by Brian Fox for the GNU
GNU
Project as a free software replacement for the Bourne shell.[7][8] First released in 1989,[9] it has been distributed widely as the default login shell for most Linux
Linux
distributions and Apple's macOS (formerly OS X). A version is also available for Windows
Windows
10.[10] Bash is a command processor that typically runs in a text window, where the user types commands that cause actions. Bash can also read and execute commands from a file, called a shell script. Like all Unix shells, it supports filename globbing (wildcard matching), piping, here documents, command substitution, variables, and control structures for condition-testing and iteration. The keywords, syntax and other basic features of the language are all copied from sh. Other features, e.g., history, are copied from csh and ksh
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ASCII
ASCII
ASCII
(/ˈæski/ ( listen) ASS-kee),[1]:6 abbreviated from American Standard Code for Information Interchange, is a character encoding standard for electronic communication
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Hyphen-minus
؋ ​₳ ​ ฿ ​₿ ​ ₵ ​¢ ​₡ ​₢ ​ $ ​₫ ​₯ ​֏ ​ ₠ ​€ ​ ƒ ​₣ ​ ₲ ​ ₴ ​ ₭ ​ ₺ ​₾ ​ ₼ ​ℳ ​₥ ​ ₦ ​ ₧ ​₱ ​₰ ​£ ​ 元 圆 圓 ​﷼ ​៛ ​₽ ​₹ ₨ ​ ₪ ​ ৳ ​₸ ​₮ ​ ₩ ​ ¥ 円Uncommon typographyasterism ⁂fleuron, hedera ❧index, fist ☞interrobang ‽irony punctuation ⸮lozenge ◊tie ⁀RelatedDiacritics Logic symbolsWhitespace charactersIn other scriptsChinese Hebrew Japanese Korean Category Portal Bookv t eThe hyphen-minus (-) is a character used in digital documents and computing to represent a hyphen (‐) or a minus sign (−).[1] It is present in Unicode
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Underscore
؋ ​₳ ​ ฿ ​₿ ​ ₵ ​¢ ​₡ ​₢ ​ $ ​₫ ​₯ ​֏ ​ ₠ ​€ ​ ƒ ​₣ ​ ₲ ​ ₴ ​ ₭ ​ ₺ ​₾ ​ ₼ ​ℳ ​₥ ​ ₦ ​ ₧ ​₱ ​₰ ​£ ​ 元 圆 圓 ​﷼ ​៛ ​₽ ​₹ ₨ ​ ₪ ​ ৳ ​₸ ​₮ ​ ₩ ​ ¥ 円Uncommon typographyasterism ⁂fleuron, hedera ❧index, fist ☞interrobang ‽irony punctuation ⸮lozenge ◊tie ⁀RelatedDiacritics Logic symbolsWhitespace charactersIn other scriptsChinese Hebrew Japanese Korean Category Portal Bookv t eThe symbol underscore ( _ ), also called underline, underbar, low line or low dash, is a character that originally appeared on the typewriter and was primarily used to underline words
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Equal Sign
؋ ​₳ ​ ฿ ​₿ ​ ₵ ​¢ ​₡ ​₢ ​ $ ​₫ ​₯ ​֏ ​ ₠ ​€ ​ ƒ ​₣ ​ ₲ ​ ₴ ​ ₭ ​ ₺ ​₾ ​ ₼ ​ℳ ​₥ ​ ₦ ​ ₧ ​₱ ​₰ ​£ ​ 元 圆 圓 ​﷼ ​៛ ​₽ ​₹ ₨ ​ ₪ ​ ৳ ​₸ ​₮ ​ ₩ ​ ¥ 円Uncommon typographyasterism ⁂fleuron, hedera ❧index, fist ☞interrobang ‽irony punctuation ⸮lozenge ◊tie ⁀RelatedDiacritics Logic symbolsWhitespace charactersIn other scriptsChinese Hebrew Japanese Korean Category Portal Bookv t e"=" and "=" redirect here. For double hyphens, see Double hyphen. For other uses, see Equals (other). For technical reasons, ":=" redirects here
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Plus Sign
؋ ​₳ ​ ฿ ​₿ ​ ₵ ​¢ ​₡ ​₢ ​ $ ​₫ ​₯ ​֏ ​ ₠ ​€ ​ ƒ ​₣ ​ ₲ ​ ₴ ​ ₭ ​ ₺ ​₾ ​ ₼ ​ℳ ​₥ ​ ₦ ​ ₧ ​₱ ​₰ ​£ ​ 元 圆 圓 ​﷼ ​៛ ​₽ ​₹ ₨ ​ ₪ ​ ৳ ​₸ ​₮ ​ ₩ ​ ¥ 円Uncommon typographyasterism ⁂fleuron, hedera ❧index, fist ☞interrobang ‽irony punctuation ⸮lozenge ◊tie ⁀RelatedDiacritics Logic symbolsWhitespace charactersIn other scriptsChinese Hebrew Japanese Korean Category Portal Bookv t eThe plus and minus signs (+ and −) are mathematical symbols used to represent the notions of positive and negative as well as the operations of addition and subtraction. Their use has been extended to many other meanings, more or less analogous
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Commodore Business Machines
Commodore
Commodore
generally refers to Commodore
Commodore
(rank), a naval rank
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Terminal Emulator
A terminal emulator, terminal application, or term,[citation needed] is a program that emulates a video terminal within some other display architecture. Though typically synonymous with a shell or text terminal, the term terminal covers all remote terminals, including graphical interfaces. A terminal emulator inside a graphical user interface is often called a terminal window. A terminal window allows the user access to a text terminal and all its applications such as command-line interfaces (CLI) and text user interface (TUI) applications. These may be running either on the same machine or on a different one via telnet, ssh, or dial-up. On Unix-like
Unix-like
operating systems, it is common to have one or more terminal windows connected to the local machine. Terminals usually support a set of escape sequences for controlling color, cursor position, etc
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PETSCII
PETSCII
PETSCII
(PET Standard Code of Information Interchange), also known as CBM ASCII, is the character set used in Commodore Business Machines (CBM)'s 8-bit home computers, starting with the PET from 1977 and including the C16, C64, C116, C128[1], CBM-II, Plus/4, and VIC-20.Contents1 History 2 Specifications 3 Character set 4 Base 128 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] The character set was largely designed by Leonard Tramiel (the son of Commodore CEO Jack Tramiel) and PET designer Chuck Peddle
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Sinclair ZX80
The Sinclair ZX80
ZX80
is a home computer brought to market in 1980 by Science of Cambridge Ltd. (later to be better known as Sinclair Research). It is notable for being the first computer (unless one counts the MK14) available in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
for less than a hundred pounds
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