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Bournemouth
Bournemouth
Bournemouth
/ˈbɔːrnməθ/ ( listen) is a large coastal resort town on the south coast of England
England
directly to the east of the Jurassic Coast, a 96-mile (155 km) World Heritage Site.[1] According to the 2011 census, the town has a population of 183,491 making it the largest settlement in Dorset. With Poole
Poole
to the west and Christchurch in the east, Bournemouth
Bournemouth
forms the South East Dorset conurbation, which has a total population of over 465,000. Before it was founded in 1810 by Lewis Tregonwell, the area was a deserted heathland occasionally visited by fishermen and smugglers. Initially marketed as a health resort, the town received a boost when it appeared in Augustus Granville's 1841 book, The Spas of England. Bournemouth's growth truly accelerated with the arrival of the railway and it became a recognised town in 1870
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Old English
Old English
Old English
(Ænglisc, Anglisc, Englisc), or Anglo-Saxon,[2] is the earliest historical form of the English language, spoken in England and southern and eastern Scotland
Scotland
in the early Middle Ages. It was brought to Great Britain
Great Britain
by Anglo-Saxon settlers probably in the mid-5th century, and the first Old English
Old English
literary works date from the mid-7th century. After the Norman conquest
Norman conquest
of 1066, English was replaced, for a time, as the language of the upper classes by Anglo-Norman, a relative of French
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Conservative Party (UK)
The Conservative Party, officially the Conservative and Unionist Party,[11] is a centre-right political party in the United Kingdom. It is currently the governing party, having been so since the 2010 general election, where a coalition government with the Liberal Democrats was formed. In 2015, the Conservatives led by David Cameron won a surprise majority and formed the first Conservative majority government since 1992.[12] However, the 2017 snap election on Thursday 8 June resulted in a hung parliament, and the party lost its parliamentary majority.[13] It is reliant on the support of a Northern Irish political party, the Democratic Unionist Party
Democratic Unionist Party
(DUP), in order to command a majority in the House of Commons through a confidence-and-supply deal. The party leader, Theresa May,[14] has served as both Leader of the Conservative Party and Prime Minister since 13 July 2016
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Tithe
A tithe (/taɪð/; from Old English: teogoþa "tenth") is a one-tenth part of something, paid as a contribution to a religious organization or compulsory tax to government.[1] Today, tithes are normally voluntary and paid in cash, cheques, or stocks, whereas historically tithes were required and paid in kind, such as agricultural products. Several European countries operate a formal process linked to the tax system allowing some churches to assess tithes. Traditional Jewish law and practice has included various forms of tithing since ancient times. Orthodox Jews commonly practice ma'aser kesafim (tithing 10% of their income to charity). In modern Israel, Jews continue to follow the laws of agricultural tithing, e.g., ma'aser rishon, terumat ma'aser, and ma'aser sheni. In Christianity, some interpretations of Biblical teachings conclude that although tithing was practiced extensively in the Old Testament, it was never practiced or taught within the first-century Church
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Gross Value Added
In economics, Gross value added (GVA) is the measure of the value of goods and services produced in an area, industry or sector of an economy. In national accounts GVA is output minus intermediate consumption;[1] it is a balancing item of the national accounts' production account.[2] Relationship to gross domestic product[edit] GVA is linked as a measurement to gross domestic product (gdp), as both are measures of output. The relationship is defined as:GVA + taxes on products - subsidies on products = GDPAs the total aggregates of taxes on products and subsidies on products are only available at whole economy level,[3] Gross value added is used for measuring gross regional domestic product and other measures of the output of entities smaller than a whole economy
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Augustus Granville
Augustus Bozzi Granville MD, FRS (born Augusto Bozzi,[1] 7 October 1783 – 3 March 1872) was a physician, writer, and Italian patriot.[2] Born in Milan, he studied medicine before leaving to avoid being enlisted in Napoleon's army. After practicing medicine in Greece, Turkey, Spain, and Portugal, he joined the British Navy
British Navy
and sailed to the West Indies. There he learned English and married an Englishwoman. He later moved to London, where he practiced as a physician and writer.[1] He is credited with carrying out the first medical autopsy on an Ancient Egyptian
Ancient Egyptian
Mummy
Mummy
which he described to the Royal Society of London in 1825.[3] Selected works[edit][Augusts Bozzi Granville,] Science Without a Head; or, The Royal Society Dissected. By One of the 687 F.R.S.---sss. (London: T. Ridgway, 1830)
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Heathland
A heath (/ˈhiːθ/) is a shrubland habitat found mainly on free-draining infertile, acidic soils and is characterised by open, low-growing woody vegetation. Moorland
Moorland
is generally related to high-ground heaths[1] with—especially in Great Britain—a cooler and more damp climate. Heaths are widespread worldwide, but are fast disappearing and considered a rare habitat in Europe.[2] They form extensive and highly diverse communities across Australia
Australia
in humid and sub-humid areas where fire regimes with recurring burning are required for the maintenance of the heathlands.[3] Even more diverse though less widespread heath communities occur in Southern Africa. Extensive heath communities can also be found in the California
California
chaparral, New Caledonia, central Chile
Chile
and along the shores of the Mediterranean Sea
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World Heritage Site
A World Heritage Site
World Heritage Site
is a landmark or area which is selected by the United Nations
United Nations
Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) as having cultural, historical, scientific or other form of significance, and is legally protected by international treaties. The sites are judged important to the collective interests of humanity. To be selected, a World Heritage Site
World Heritage Site
must be an already classified landmark, unique in some respect as a geographically and historically identifiable place having special cultural or physical significance (such as an ancient ruin or historical structure, building, city, complex, desert, forest, island, lake, monument, mountain, or wilderness area)
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Jurassic Coast
Coordinates: 50°42′20″N 2°59′23.6″W / 50.70556°N 2.989889°W / 50.70556; -2.989889 Dorset
Dorset
and East Devon
East Devon
Coast UNESCO
UNESCO
World Heritage SiteThe Jurassic
Jurassic
Coast west of St Aldhelm's HeadLocation United KingdomCriteria Natural: viiiReference 1029Inscription 2001 (25th Session)Website jurassiccoast.orgCoordinates 50°42′20″N 2°59′24″W / 50.70556°N 2.99000°W / 50.70556; -2.99000Location of Jurassic
Jurassic
Coast in England.The Jurassic
Jurassic
Coast is a World Heritage Site
World Heritage Site
on the English Channel coast of southern England
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Telephone Numbering Plan
A telephone numbering plan is a type of numbering scheme used in telecommunication to assign telephone numbers to subscriber telephones or other telephony endpoints.[1] Telephone numbers are the addresses of participants in a telephone network, reachable by a system of destination code routing. Telephone numbering plans are defined in each of administrative regions of the public switched telephone network (PSTN) and they are also present in private telephone networks. For public number systems, geographic location plays a role in the sequence of numbers assigned to each telephone subscriber. Numbering plans may follow a variety of design strategies which have often arisen from the historical evolution of individual telephone networks and local requirements. A broad division is commonly recognized, distinguishing open numbering plans and closed numbering plans[discuss]
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BH Postcode Area
A postal code (also known locally in various English-speaking countries throughout the world as a postcode, post code, Eircode, PIN Code or ZIP Code) is a series of letters or digits or both, sometimes including spaces or punctuation, included in a postal address for the purpose of sorting mail. In February 2005, 117 of the 190 member countries of the Universal Postal Union had postal code systems. Although postal codes are usually assigned to geographical areas, special codes are sometimes assigned to individual addresses or to institutions that receive large volumes of mail, such as government agencies and large commercial companies
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UTC+1
UTC+01:00, known simply as UTC+1, is a time offset that adds 1 hour to Coordinated Universal Time
Coordinated Universal Time
(UTC). This time is used in:Central European Time West Africa Time Western European Summer TimeBritish Summer Time Irish Standard TimeRomance Standard Time (Microsoft Windows Control panel) Swatch Internet Time EVE OnlineIn ISO 8601 the associated time would be written as 2018-04-07T11:14:27+01:00.Contents1
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British Summer Time
During British Summer Time
British Summer Time
(BST), civil time in the United Kingdom, Ireland
Ireland
and Portugal
Portugal
is advanced one hour forward of Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) (in effect, changing the time zone from UTC+0 to UTC+1), so that evenings have more daylight and mornings have less.[1][2] BST begins at 01:00 GMT on the last Sunday of March and ends at 01:00 GMT (02:00 BST) on the last Sunday of October. Since 22 October 1995, the starting and finishing times of daylight saving time across the European Union
European Union
have been aligned[3] – for instance Central European Summer Time begins and ends on the same Sundays at exactly the same time (that is, 02:00 CET, which is 01:00 GMT)
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Daylight Saving Time
Daylight saving time
Daylight saving time
(abbreviated DST), sometimes referred to as daylight savings time in US, Canadian and Australian speech,[1][2] and known as British Summer Time
British Summer Time
(BST) in the UK and just summer time in some countries, is the practice of advancing clocks during summer months so that evening daylight lasts longer, while sacrificing normal sunrise times. Typically, regions that use daylight saving time adjust clocks forward one hour close to the start of spring and adjust them backward in the autumn to standard time.[3] George Hudson proposed the idea of daylight saving in 1895.[4] The German Empire
German Empire
and Austria-Hungary
Austria-Hungary
organized the first nationwide implementation, starting on April 30, 1916
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Town Status In The United Kingdom
In England, Wales
Wales
and Northern Ireland, a town traditionally was a settlement which had a charter to hold a market or fair and therefore became a "market town". In Scotland, the equivalent is known as a burgh (pronounced [ˈbʌɾə]). There are two types of burgh: royal burghs and burghs of barony. The Local Government Act 1972
Local Government Act 1972
allows civil parishes in England
England
and Wales
Wales
to resolve themselves to be Town Councils, under section (245 subsection 6), which also gives the chairman of such parishes the title 'town mayor'
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Greenwich Mean Time
Greenwich
Greenwich
Mean Time
Time
(GMT) is the mean solar time at the Royal Observatory in Greenwich, London. GMT was formerly used as the international civil time standard, now superseded in that function by Coordinated Universal Time
Coordinated Universal Time
(UTC). Today GMT is considered equivalent to UTC for UK civil purposes (but this is not formalised) and for navigation is considered equivalent to UT1 (the modern form of mean solar time at 0° longitude); these two meanings can differ by up to 0.9 s
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