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Bottle Up And Go
"Bottle Up and Go" or "Bottle It Up and Go" is a song that is a standard of the blues.[1] Based on earlier songs, Delta bluesman Tommy McClennan recorded "Bottle It Up and Go" in 1939. The song has been interpreted and recorded by numerous artists, sometimes using alternate titles, such as "Step It Up and Go", "Shake It Up and Go", etc. John Lee Hooker
John Lee Hooker
performed it throughout his career and recorded several versions of the song.Contents1 Earlier songs 2 Tommy McClennan song 3 John Lee Hooker
John Lee Hooker
versions 4 Other versions 5 ReferencesEarlier songs[edit] In 1932, a jug band version of "Bottle It Up and Go" was recorded by a loose musical collective led by Will Shade
Will Shade
and Charlie Burse, who recorded as the Memphis Jug Band, Picaninny Jug Band, Dixieland Jug Blowers, Dallas Jug Band, and other names
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Single (music)
In music, a single, record single or music single is a type of release, typically a song recording of fewer tracks than an LP record, an album or an EP record. This can be released for sale to the public in a variety of different formats. In most cases, a single is a song that is released separately from an album, although it usually also appears on an album. Typically, these are the songs from albums that are released separately for promotional uses such as digital download or commercial radio airplay and are expected to be the most popular. In other cases a recording released as a single may not appear on an album. As digital downloading and audio streaming have become more prevalent, it is often possible for every track on an album to also be available separately
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Maddox Brothers And Rose
The Maddox Brothers and Rose, known as America’s Most Colorful Hillbilly Band from the 1930s to the 1950s, consisted of four brothers, Fred, Cal, Cliff and Don Maddox, along with their sister Rose. Cliff died in 1949 and was replaced by brother Henry. The group disbanded in 1956. Contents1 Biography 2 Band members 3 Discography 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] The family hailed from Boaz, Alabama, but rode the rails and hitch hiked to California in 1933 when the band members were still children, following the failed efforts of their sharecropper parents during the early part of the Depression. They were a little in advance of the flood of Okies who were to flood the state in the 1930s. They struggled to make a living as intinerant fruit and vegetable pickers following the harvest as far north as Washington state, and as far east as Arizona, as well as in the San Joaquin Valley
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Ted Gioia
Ted Gioia
Ted Gioia
(born 21 October 1957) is an American jazz critic and music historian who wrote The History of Jazz
Jazz
and Delta Blues, both selected as notable books of the year by The New York Times.[1][2] Gioia is an editor-in-chief of the Encyclopedia of Jazz
Jazz
Musicians. He is also a jazz musician and one of the founders of Stanford University's jazz studies program.[3][4][5][6][7]Contents1 Career 2 Books 3 Selected discography3.1 Selected audio and visual4 References 5 External linksCareer[edit] Gioia is the author of several other books on music, including West Coast Jazz
Jazz
(1992), The Jazz
Jazz
Standards (2012), and The Birth (and Death) of the Cool (2009). A second fully updated and expanded edition of The History of Jazz
Jazz
was published by Oxford University
Oxford University
Press in 2011
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Canned Heat
Canned Heat
Canned Heat
is an American rock band formed in Los Angeles
Los Angeles
in 1965. The group has been noted for its interpretations of blues material and for its efforts to promote interest in this type of music and its original artists
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Blind Boy Fuller
Blind Boy Fuller
Blind Boy Fuller
(born Fulton Allen, July 10, 1904[1] or 1907 – February 13, 1941)[2] was an American blues guitarist and singer. Of the recorded Piedmont blues
Piedmont blues
artists, a group that includes Blind Blake, Josh White, and Buddy Moss, Fuller was one of the most popular with rural African Americans.Contents1 Life and career 2 Death 3 Grave location 4 References 5 External linksLife and career[edit] Allen was born in Wadesboro, North Carolina, one of ten children of Calvin Allen and Mary Jane Walker. Most sources date his birth to 1907, but the researchers Bob Eagle and Eric LeBlanc indicate 1904.[1] After the death of his mother, he moved with his father to Rockingham, North Carolina
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Lead Belly
Huddie William Ledbetter /ˈhjuːdi/ (January 20, 1888 – December 6, 1949)[1] was an American folk and blues musician notable for his strong vocals, virtuosity on the twelve-string guitar, and the folk standards he introduced. He is best known as Lead Belly. Though many releases credit him as "Leadbelly", he himself wrote it as "Lead Belly", which is also the spelling on his tombstone[2][3] and the spelling used by the Lead Belly
Lead Belly
Foundation.[4] Lead Belly
Lead Belly
usually played a twelve-string guitar, but he also played the piano, mandolin, harmonica, violin, and "windjammer" (diatonic accordion).[5] In some of his recordings, he sang while clapping his hands or stomping his foot. Lead Belly's songs covered a wide range of genres and topics including gospel music; blues about women, liquor, prison life, and racism; and folk songs about cowboys, prison, work, sailors, cattle herding, and dancing
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Sonny Terry
Saunders Teddell,[2][3] or Saunders Terrell (or other variants, sources differ) (October 24, 1911 – March 11, 1986),[4] known as Sonny Terry, was an American Piedmont blues
Piedmont blues
and folk musician,[1] who was known for his energetic blues harmonica style, which frequently included vocal whoops and hollers and occasionally imitations of trains and fox hunts.Contents1 Career 2 Discography 3 See also 4 ReferencesCareer[edit] Terry was born in Greensboro, Georgia.[5] His father, a farmer, taught him to play basic blues harp as a youth. He sustained injuries to his eyes and went blind by the time he was 16, which prevented him from doing farm work,[4] and was forced to play music in order to earn a living. Terry played Campdown Races to the plow horses which improved the efficiency of farming in the area. He began playing blues in Shelby, North Carolina
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Brownie McGhee
Walter Brown "Brownie" McGhee (November 30, 1915 – February 16, 1996)[1] was an African-American
African-American
folk music and Piedmont blues
Piedmont blues
singer and guitarist, best known for his collaboration with the harmonica player Sonny Terry.[2]Contents1 Life and career 2 Discography2.1 Solo albums 2.2 Compilation 2.3 With Sonny Terry3 See also 4 References 5 External linksLife and career[edit] McGhee was born in Knoxville, Tennessee, and grew up in Kingsport, Tennessee.[3] At about the age of four he contracted polio, which incapacitated his right leg. His brother Granville "Sticks"(or "Stick") McGhee, who also later became a musician and composed the famous song "Drinkin' Wine Spo-Dee-o-Dee,"[4] was nicknamed for pushing young Brownie around in a cart. Their father, George McGhee, was a factory worker, known around University Avenue for playing guitar and singing
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Western Swing
Western swing
Western swing
music is a subgenre of American country music that originated in the late 1920s in the West and South among the region's Western string bands.[1][2] It is dance music, often with an up-tempo beat,[3][4] which attracted huge crowds to dance halls and clubs in Texas, Oklahoma
Oklahoma
and
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Charles Shaar Murray
Charles Shaar Murray (born Charles Maximillian Murray on 27 June 1951) is an English music journalist and broadcaster. He has worked on the New Musical Express and many other magazines and newspapers, and has been interviewed for a number of television documentaries and reports on music.[1]Contents1 Biography 2 Bibliography 3 Broadcasting 4 Performance 5 References 6 External linksBiography[edit] Murray grew up in Reading, Berkshire,[2] where he attended Reading School and learnt to play the harmonica and guitar. His first experience in journalism came aged 18 in 1970 when he was asked to contribute to the satirical magazine Oz. In particular, he contributed to the notorious Schoolkids OZ
Schoolkids OZ
issue, and was involved in the consequent obscenity trial.[1][2] He then wrote for IT (International Times), before decamping to the New Musical Express in 1972[3][4] for which he wrote until around 1986
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Papa Charlie McCoy
Charles "Papa Charlie" McCoy (May 26, 1909 – July 26, 1950)[1] was an African-American Delta blues musician and songwriter.Contents1 Career 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksCareer[edit] McCoy was born in Jackson, Mississippi. He was best known by his nickname, Papa Charlie. As a guitarist and mandolin player, he was one of the major blues accompanists of his time.[2] He played in the Mississippi area with his band, the Mississippi Hot Footers. As a slide guitarist, he recorded under the name Tampa Kid, releasing "Keep on Trying". He and his older brother Kansas Joe McCoy performed together in the 1930s and 1940s and recorded as the McCoy Brothers. McCoy and Bo Carter recorded several sides as the Mississippi Mud Steppers, including two variations of Cow Cow Davenport's "Cow Cow Blues": the first, an instrumental, was released as "The Jackson Stomp", and the second, with lyrics and vocals by McCoy, as "The Lonesome Train, That Took My Girl from Town"
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The Everly Brothers
The Everly Brothers
The Everly Brothers
were an American country-influenced rock and roll duo, known for steel-string acoustic guitar playing and close harmony singing. Isaac Donald "Don" Everly (born February 1, 1937) and Phillip "Phil" Everly (January 19, 1939 – January 3, 2014) were inducted to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame
Rock and Roll Hall of Fame
in 1986 and the Country Music Hall of Fame in 2001.Contents1 History1.1 Family and education 1.2 1950s 1.3 1960s/1970s 1.4 Solo years (1973-83) 1.5 Reunion, subsequent activities (1983-2006) 1.6 Phil Everly's death 1.7 Recent activities2 Style and influences 3 Legacy 4 Achievements and honors 5 Tributes and interpretations by other artists 6 Discography 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit] Family and education[edit] Don was born in Brownie, Muhlenberg County, Kentucky, in 1937, and Phil two years later in Chicago, Illinois
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Instant Party!
Instant Party! is an album by the Everly Brothers, originally released in 1962. It was recorded in Nashville between August and November 1961, shortly after Both Sides of an Evening and it too failed to chart. There is an exclamation point on the cover art but not in the title as shown on the original label.[2]Contents1 Critical reception 2 Track listing 3 Personnel 4 References 5 External linksCritical reception[edit] The album consisted mainly of older pop tunes, making this release notable in its lack of the duo's normal rock and roll. Allmusic stated in its review: "...much of the playing was impeccable, but also, apart from three exceptions, incredibly boring, something the Everlys had never been before
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Bob Dylan
Bob Dylan
Bob Dylan
(/ˈdɪlən/; born Robert Allen Zimmerman, May 24, 1941) is an American singer-songwriter, author, and painter, who has been an influential figure in popular music and culture for more than five decades. Much of his most celebrated work dates from the 1960s, when he became a reluctant "voice of a generation"[2] with songs such as "Blowin' in the Wind" and "The Times They Are a-Changin'" that became anthems for the Civil Rights Movement
Civil Rights Movement
and anti-war movement. In 1965, he controversially abandoned his early fan-base in the American folk music revival, recording a six-minute single, "Like a Rolling Stone", which enlarged the scope of popular music. Dylan's lyrics incorporate a wide range of political, social, philosophical, and literary influences. They defied existing pop-music conventions and appealed to the burgeoning counterculture
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Good As I Been To You
Good as I Been to You
Good as I Been to You
is the 28th studio album by American singer-songwriter Bob Dylan, released on November 3, 1992, by Columbia Records. It is composed entirely of traditional folk songs and covers, and is Dylan's first entirely solo, acoustic album since Another Side of Bob Dylan in 1964. It is also his first collection not to feature any original compositions since Dylan in 1973. On the charts, Good as I Been to You
Good as I Been to You
reached  No.  51 in the US and  No.  18 in the UK, and helped to restore Dylan's critical standing following the disappointing Under the Red Sky.Contents1 Recording sessions 2 Song selection 3 Outtakes 4 Aftermath 5 Track listing 6 Personnel 7 ReferencesRecording sessions[edit] Since launching the Never Ending Tour
Never Ending Tour
in June 1988, traditional covers became a feature at virtually every concert, often as part of an acoustic set
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