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Boshin War
1868 Imperial Court Tozama:Satchō Alliance Satsuma Domain Chōshū DomainOther tozama daimyōs: Tosa Domain Hiroshima Domain Tsu Domain Saga Domain Ōgaki Domain Hirosaki Domain Kuroishi Domain Yodo Domain1868 Shogunate Aizu
Aizu
Domain Takamatsu Domain Northern Alliance Jōzai Domain Tsuruoka Domain Kuwana Domain Matsuyama Domain Defected: Tsu Domain Yodo Domain Ōgaki Domain1869  Empire of JapanSupported by:  United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland1869 Republic of EzoSupported by:  French EmpireCommanders and leaders
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Felice Beato
Felice Beato
Felice Beato
(1832 – 29 January 1909), also known as Felix Beato,[note 1] was an Italian–British photographer. He was one of the first people to take photographs in East Asia and one of the first war photographers. He is noted for his genre works, portraits, and views and panoramas of the architecture and landscapes of Asia and the Mediterranean region. Beato's travels gave him the opportunity to create images of countries, people, and events that were unfamiliar and remote to most people in Europe and North America. His work provides images of such events as the Indian Rebellion of 1857
Indian Rebellion of 1857
and the Second Opium War, and represents the first substantial body of photojournalism
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Enomoto Takeaki
Viscount
Viscount
Enomoto Takeaki
Enomoto Takeaki
(榎本 武揚, 5 October 1836 – 26 October 1908) was a Japanese samurai and admiral of the Tokugawa navy of Bakumatsu-period Japan, who remained faithful to the Tokugawa shogunate and fought against the new Meiji government until the end of the Boshin War. He later served in the Meiji government as one of the founders of the Imperial Japanese Navy.Contents1 Biography1.1 Early life 1.2 Boshin War
Boshin War
and Meiji Restoration 1.3 As a Meiji politician2 Honours 3 See also 4 Notes 5 ReferencesBiography[edit] Early life[edit] Enomoto was born as a member of a samurai family in the direct service of the Tokugawa clan
Tokugawa clan
in the Shitaya district of Edo
Edo
(modern Taitō, Tokyo)
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Second French Empire
The French Second Empire
Empire
(French: Second Empire)[1] was the Imperial Bonapartist regime of Napoleon III
Napoleon III
from 1852 to 1870, between the Second Republic and the Third Republic, in France.Contents1 Rule of Napoleon III 2 History2.1 Coup of 1851 2.2 Early reign 2.3 Freedom of the press 2.4 The Union libérale 2.5 Rise of Prussia 2.6 Mobilization of the working classes 2.7 Plebiscite of 1870 2.8 End of the Empire3 See also 4 References 5 Sources 6 Further reading6.1 Surveys 6.2 Politics 6.3 Military and diplomatic 6.4 Social and economic 6.5 Historiography7 External linksRule of Napoleon III[edit]Napoléon IIIImperial Standard of Napoléon IIIThe structure of the French government during the Second Empire
Empire
was little changed from the First. But Emperor Napoleon III
Napoleon III
stressed his own imperial role as the foundation of the government
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Emperor Meiji
Emperor Meiji
Emperor Meiji
(明治天皇, Meiji-tennō, November 3, 1852 – July 30, 1912), or Meiji the Great (明治大帝, Meiji-taitei), was the 122nd Emperor of Japan
Emperor of Japan
according to the traditional order of succession, reigning from February 3, 1867 until his death on July 30, 1912. He presided over a time of rapid change in the Empire of Japan, as the nation quickly changed from an isolationist feudal state to a capitalist and imperial world power, characterized by the Japanese industrial revolution. At the time of Meiji's birth in 1852, Japan
Japan
was an isolated, pre-industrial, feudal country dominated by the Tokugawa shogunate
Tokugawa shogunate
and the daimyōs, who ruled over the country's more than 250 decentralized domains
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Prince Komatsu Akihito
Prince
Prince
Komatsu Akihito (小松宮彰仁親王, Komatsu-no-miya
Komatsu-no-miya
Akihito shinnō, February 11, 1846 – February 18, 1903) was a Japanese career officer in the Imperial Japanese Army, who was a member of the Fushimi-no-miya, one of the shinnōke branches of the Imperial Family of Japan, which were eligible to succeed to the Chrysanthemum Throne in the event that the main line should die out.Contents1 Biography1.1 Early life 1.2 Military career2 Diplomatic career 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Early life[edit]Statue of Prince
Prince
Komatsu Akihito in Ueno Park. Prince
Prince
Akihito was born as Prince
Prince
Yoshiaki, the seventh son of Prince Fushimi Kuniie. In 1858, he was adopted by Emperor Ninkō
Emperor Ninkō
as a potential heir to the throne
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Saigō Takamori
Saigō Takamori
Saigō Takamori
(Takanaga) (西郷 隆盛 (隆永), January 23, 1828 – September 24, 1877) was one of the most influential samurai in Japanese history and one of the three great nobles who led the Meiji Restoration. Living during the late Edo
Edo
and early Meiji periods, he has been dubbed the last true samurai.[1] He was born Saigō Kokichi (西郷 小吉), and received the given name Takamori in adulthood
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Kuroda Kiyotaka
Count
Count
Kuroda Kiyotaka
Kuroda Kiyotaka
(黒田 清隆, November 9, 1840 – August 23, 1900), also known as Kuroda Ryōsuke (黒田 了介), was a Japanese politician of the Meiji era.[1] He was the second Prime Minister of Japan
Japan
from April 30, 1888, to October 25, 1889.Contents1 Biography1.1 As a Satsuma samurai 1.2 Political and Diplomatic Career 1.3 Prime minister 1.4 Later life2 Honours 3 See also 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksBiography[edit] As a Satsuma samurai[edit] Kuroda was born to a samurai-class family serving the Shimazu daimyō of Kagoshima, Satsuma Domain, in Kyūshū. In 1862, Kuroda was involved in the Namamugi incident, in which Satsuma retainers killed a British national who refused to bow down to the daimyo's procession. This led to the Anglo-Satsuma War
Anglo-Satsuma War
in 1863, in which Kuroda played an active role
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Ōmura Masujirō
Ōmura Masujirō
Ōmura Masujirō
(大村 益次郎, May 30, 1824 – December 7, 1869) was a Japanese military leader and theorist in Bakumatsu period
Bakumatsu period
Japan. He was the "Father" of the Imperial Japanese Army, launching a modern military force closely patterned after the French system of the day.Contents1 Early life and education 2 Early career 3 As a Military Leader 4 The Making of the Meiji Military 5 The Later Years 6 Legacy 7 Notes 8 References and further reading 9 External linksEarly life and education[edit] Ōmura was born in what is now part of Yamaguchi city, in the former Chōshū Domain, where his father was a rural physician
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Yamagata Aritomo
Prince
Prince
Yamagata Aritomo
Yamagata Aritomo
(山縣 有朋, June 14, 1838 – February 1, 1922), also known as Yamagata Kyōsuke,[1] was a Japanese field marshal in the Imperial Japanese Army
Imperial Japanese Army
and twice Prime Minister of Japan. He was one of the main architects of the military and political foundations of early modern Japan. Yamagata Aritomo
Yamagata Aritomo
can be seen as the father of Japanese militarism.[2]Contents1 Early career 2 Military career 3 Political career 4 Personal life and hobbies 5 Awards5.1 Japanese5.1.1 Peerages and titles 5.1.2 Decorations 5.1.3 Order of precedence5.2 Foreign6 Notes 7 ReferencesEarly career[edit]Yamagata in his early years.Yamagata was born in a lower-ranked samurai family from Hagi, the capital of the feudal domain of Chōshū (present-day Yamaguchi prefecture)
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Kirino Toshiaki
Kirino Toshiaki
Kirino Toshiaki
(桐野 利秋, December 1838 – September 24, 1877) was a Japanese samurai of the late Edo period, and an Imperial Japanese Army general of the early Meiji era.Contents1 Biography 2 Cultural references 3 References 4 External links 5 Further readingBiography[edit] Kirino, also known as Nakamura Hanjirō (中村 半次郎), was renowned as one of the Four Hitokiri of the Bakumatsu. His sword style was Ko-jigen-ryū, a branch of the high-speed Jigen-ryū . Kirino's activities during the early to mid-1860s largely centered on Kyoto. During the Boshin War, as a senior commander of Satsuma forces, he was a high-ranking officer of the new Imperial Army
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Tokugawa Yoshinobu
Prince Tokugawa Yoshinobu
Tokugawa Yoshinobu
(徳川 慶喜, also known as Tokugawa Keiki; October 28, 1837 – November 22, 1913) was the 15th and last shōgun of the Tokugawa shogunate
Tokugawa shogunate
of Japan. He was part of a movement which aimed to reform the aging shogunate, but was ultimately unsuccessful. After resigning in late 1867, he went into retirement, and largely avoided the public eye for the rest of his life.Contents1 Early life 2 Shōgun
Shōgun
(1866–1867) 3 Boshin War
Boshin War
(1868–69) 4 Later life 5 Honors5.1 Order of precedence6 Eras of Yoshinobu's bakufu 7 Family 8 Ancestry8.1 Patrilineal descent9 See also 10 Notes 11 References 12 Further reading12.1 Works of fiction13 External linksEarly life[edit] Tokugawa Yoshinobu
Tokugawa Yoshinobu
was born in Edo, as the seventh son of Tokugawa Nariaki, daimyō of Mito
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Katsu Kaishū
Count
Count
Katsu Kaishū
Katsu Kaishū
(勝 海舟, March 12, 1823 – January 21, 1899) was a Japanese statesman and naval engineer during the late Tokugawa shogunate and early Meiji period.[1] Kaishū was a nickname which he took from a piece of calligraphy (Kaishū Shooku 海舟書屋) by Sakuma Shōzan. He went through a series of given names throughout his life; his childhood name was Rintarō (麟太郎) and his birth name was Yoshikuni (義邦). He was often called Awa (安房) from his title Awano-kami (安房守) during the late Tokugawa shogunate
Tokugawa shogunate
and changed his name to Yasuyoshi (安芳) after the Meiji Restoration. Katsu Kaishū
Katsu Kaishū
eventually rose to occupy the position of commissioner (Gunkan-bugyō) in the Tokugawa navy
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Matsudaira Katamori
In this Japanese name, the family name is Matsudaira. Matsudaira Katamori
Matsudaira Katamori
(松平 容保, February 15, 1836 – December 5, 1893) was a samurai who lived in the last days of the Edo
Edo
period and the early to mid Meiji period. He was the 9th daimyō of the Aizu
Aizu
han and the Military Commissioner of Kyoto during the Bakumatsu
Bakumatsu
period. During the Boshin War, Katamori and the Aizu
Aizu
han fought against the Meiji Government armies, but were severely defeated
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United Kingdom Of Great Britain And Ireland
The United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Ireland
Ireland
was a sovereign country in western Europe, the predecessor to the modern United Kingdom of Great Britain
Kingdom of Great Britain
and Northern Ireland. It was established on 1 January 1801 by the Acts of Union 1800, which merged the kingdoms of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Ireland. Britain financed the European coalition that defeated France in 1815 in the Napoleonic Wars. Britain, with its unsurpassed Royal Navy
Royal Navy
and British Empire, became the foremost world power for the next century. The Crimean War
Crimean War
with Russia and the Boer wars were relatively small operations in a largely peaceful century.[1] Rapid industrialisation that began in the decades prior to the state's formation continued up until the mid-19th century
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Shinoda Gisaburō
Shinoda Gisaburō (篠田 儀三郎, 1852 – October 8, 1868) was a Japanese samurai of the late Edo period
Edo period
who served the Matsudaira clan of Aizu. He was the leader of a detachment of Byakkotai
Byakkotai
troops who got separated from their main unit, and arrived at the top of Iimori Hill. From Iimori Hill they thought they saw Tsuruga Castle on fire, and committed suicide in despair. References[edit]Hoshi Ryōichi. Onnatachi no Aizusensō. ----. Byakkotai
Byakkotai
to Aizu
Aizu
bushidō. Yamakawa Kenjirō
Yamakawa Kenjirō
(1933). Aizu
Aizu
Boshin Senshi. Tokyo: Tokyo Daigaku Shuppankai.This article about samurai or samurai-related topic is a stub
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