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Boscobel House
Boscobel
Boscobel
House (grid reference SJ837082) is a Grade II* listed building in the parish of Boscobel
Boscobel
in Shropshire.[1] It has been, at various times, a farmhouse, a hunting lodge, and a holiday home; but it is most famous for its role in the escape of Charles II after the Battle of Worcester
Battle of Worcester
in 1651
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Hudson River
The Hudson River
Hudson River
is a 315-mile (507 km) river that flows from north to south primarily through eastern New York in the United States. The river originates in the Adirondack Mountains
Adirondack Mountains
of Upstate New York, flows through the Hudson Valley, and eventually drains into the Atlantic Ocean, between New York City
New York City
and Jersey City. The river serves as a political boundary between the states of New Jersey
New Jersey
and New York, and further north between New York counties. The lower half of the river is a tidal estuary, deeper than the body of water into which it flows, occupying the Hudson Fjord, an inlet which formed during the most recent period of North American glaciation, estimated at 26,000 to 13,300 years ago
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Recusants
Recusancy
Recusancy
was the state of those who refused to attend Anglican services during the history of England and Wales
England and Wales
and of Ireland; these individuals were known as recusants.[
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Gentry
The term gentry (genterie; Old French
Old French
gentil: "high-born", "noble") describes the "well-born, genteel, and well-bred people" of the social class below the nobility of a society.[1][2] As families of long descent, who never obtained the right to bear a coat of arms, their inherited socio-economic position connected them to the landed estates (manorialism) and to the upper levels of the clergy
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Madeley, Shropshire
Madeley is a town and civil parish in Shropshire, England, now part of the new town of Telford. The parish had a population of 17,935 at the 2001 census.[1] Madeley is recorded in the Domesday Book, having been founded before the 8th century. Historically, Madeley's industrial activity has largely been in mining, and later, manufacturing, which is still a large employer in the town, along with service industries. Parts of the parish fall within the UNESCO
UNESCO
World Heritage Site
World Heritage Site
of Ironbridge Gorge, the site of The Iron Bridge, and a key area in the development of Industry.Contents1 History 2 Governance 3 Geography 4 Demography 5 Economy 6 Transport 7 Education 8 Religious sites 9 Notable people9.1 other notable people10 References 11 External linksHistory[edit] The settlement of Madeley is recorded as far back as the Domesday Book
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Housewarming Party
A house-warming party is a party traditionally held soon after moving into a new residence. It is an occasion for the hosts to present their new home to their friends, pre-moving, and for friends to give gifts to furnish the new home. House-warming parties are generally informal. Usually there are no planned activities besides a possible tour.Contents1 Etiquette 2 Origins 3 In French-speaking countries 4 Variations4.1 Regional 4.2 Other5 ReferencesEtiquette[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (October 2017) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)It is considered proper etiquette to invite guests at least a few days, or up to three weeks, in advance.[1] Gifts are customarily necessary
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Bolbec
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Bolbec
Bolbec
is a commune in the Seine-Maritime
Seine-Maritime
department in the Normandy region in northern France. Its inhabitants are called Bolbécais or Bolbécaises.Contents1 Geography 2 History2.1 Bolbec
Bolbec
today 2.2 Heraldry3 Economy3.1 Industry4 Sights 5 Notable people 6 Twin towns 7 See also 8 References 9 BibliographyGeography[edit] A farming, quarrying and light industrial town situated at the heart of three valleys in the Pays de Caux, some 19 miles (31 km) northeast of Le Havre. It is the source of the river Commerce, though here it is known as the river Bolbec
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Upper Normandy
Upper Normandy
Normandy
(French: Haute-Normandie, IPA: [ot nɔʁmɑ̃di]; Norman: Ĥâote-Normaundie) is a former administrative region of France. On 1 January 2016, Upper and Lower Normandy
Normandy
merged becoming one region called Normandy.[1]Contents1 History 2 Major communities 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] It was created in 1956 from two departments: Seine-Maritime
Seine-Maritime
and Eure, when Normandy
Normandy
was divided into Lower Normandy
Normandy
and Upper Normandy. This division continued to provoke controversy, and many people continued to call for the two regions to be reunited. The two regions were finally merged on 1 January 2016
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Osbern Giffard
Osbern (or Osborne) Giffard (c. 1020, Longueville-le-Giffard, Duchy of Normandy (now Longueville-sur-Scie, France) – c. 1085 Brimpsfield, Gloucestershire) was one of the knights who invaded England in 1066 under William the Conqueror.[2] He was rewarded with holdings throughout Gloucestershire, Hampshire, Wiltshire and Somerset.[3] He settled in Brimpsfield, where he built a castle which was destroyed by Edward II in 1322. It is believed that the Gloucestershire village of Stoke Gifford is named after him.[4][5] Giffard's nephew, Walter became the 1st Earl of Buckingham.[6] Family[edit] Giffard was a son of Osborn (or Osberne or Osborne or Osbern) de Bolebec, Lord of Longueville-le-Giffard by either Avelina or Wevia, sisters of Gunnora, Duchess of Normandy
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Walter Giffard, 1st Earl Of Buckingham
Walter Giffard, Lord of Longueville in Normandy, 1st Earl of Buckingham (died 1102) was an Anglo-Norman magnate. He was the son of Walter Giffard, Lord of Longueville (one of the few proven companions of William the Conqueror at the Battle of Hastings in 1066) [1] and Ermengarde daughter of Gerald Flaitel.[2] His father had been given 107 lordships, 48 of which were in Buckinghamshire which Giffard inherited by 1085.[3] The caput of his feudal honor was at Crendon, Buckinghamshire.[4] He held an important castle at Longueville overlooking the River Scie as well as vast estates in Buckinghamshire.[5] As he held lands in both England and Normandy he was a vassal t
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William The Conqueror
William I[a] (c. 1028[1] – 9 September 1087), usually known as William the Conqueror
William the Conqueror
and sometimes William the Bastard,[2][b] was the first Norman King of England, reigning from 1066 until his death in 1087. A descendant of Rollo, he was Duke
Duke
of Normandy
Normandy
(as William II) from 1035 onward. After a long struggle to establish his power, by 1060 his hold on Normandy
Normandy
was secure, and he launched the Norman conquest of England
Norman conquest of England
six years later. The rest of his life was marked by struggles to consolidate his hold over England and his continental lands and by difficulties with his eldest son. William was the son of the unmarried Robert I, Duke
Duke
of Normandy, by Robert's mistress Herleva
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Catholics
The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with more than 1.29 billion members worldwide.[4] As one of the oldest religious institutions in the world, it has played a prominent role in the history and development of Western civilisation.[5] Headed by the Bishop of Rome, known as the Pope, the church's doctrines are summarised in the Nicene Creed
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Dissolution Of The Monasteries
The Dissolution of the Monasteries, sometimes referred to as the Suppression of the Monasteries, was the set of anti-Catholic administrative and legal processes between 1536 and 1541 by which Henry VIII disbanded Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
monasteries, priories, convents and friaries in England and Wales
Wales
and Ireland, appropriated their income, disposed of their assets, and provided for their former personnel and functions
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Church Of England
The Church of England
England
(C of E) is the state church of England.[3][4][5] The Archbishop of Canterbury
Archbishop of Canterbury
(currently Justin Welby) is the most senior cleric, although the monarch is the supreme governor. The Church of England
England
is also the mother church of the international Anglican
Anglican
Communion
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Catholic Emancipation
Catholic emancipation
Catholic emancipation
or Catholic relief was a process in the Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland
Ireland
in the late 18th century and early 19th century that involved reducing and removing many of the restrictions on Roman Catholics introduced by the Act of Uniformity, the Test Acts and the penal laws. Requirements to abjure (renounce) the temporal and spiritual authority of the Pope
Pope
and transubstantiation placed major burdens on Roman Catholics. The penal laws started to be dismantled from 1766
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Huntingdonshire
Huntingdonshire (/ˈhʌntɪŋdənʃər/ or /ˈhʌntɪŋdənʃɪər/; abbreviated Hunts) is a non-metropolitan district of Cambridgeshire, as well as a historic county of England. Its council is based in Huntingdon. Other towns in the district are St Ives, Godmanchester, St Neots and Ramsey
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