HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Border Reivers
Border reivers were raiders along the Anglo-Scottish border
Anglo-Scottish border
from the late 13th century to the beginning of the 17th century. Their ranks consisted of both Scottish and English people, and they raided the entire Border country
Border country
without regard to their victims' nationality. Their heyday was in the last hundred years of their existence, during the time of the Stewart Kings
Stewart Kings
in Scotland
Scotland
and the Tudor dynasty
Tudor dynasty
in England.Contents1 Background 2 Nature 3 Borders horse 4 Dwellings and fortifications 5 Law and order5.1 Legislation6 Border surnames and clan status 7 Aftermath 8 See also 9 Notes 10 References 11 External linksBackground[edit] Scotland
Scotland
and England
England
were frequently at war during the late Middle Ages
[...More...]

"Border Reivers" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

William Patten (historian)
William Patten (c. 1510 – after 1598) was an author, scholar and government official during the reigns of King Edward VI and Queen Elizabeth I.William Patten, 1820 engravingContents1 Early career 2 Financial downfall 3 Literary and scholarly pursuits 4 Marriages and issue 5 Footnotes 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksEarly career[edit] William Patten (b. circa 1510 – d. in or after 1598)[1] was born in London, the son of Richard Patten (d. 1536), clothworker, and Grace, the daughter of John Baskerville
[...More...]

"William Patten (historian)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Sword
A sword is a bladed weapon intended for slashing or thrusting that is longer than a knife or dagger. The precise definition of the term varies with the historical epoch or the geographical region under consideration. A sword consists of a long blade attached to a hilt. The blade can be straight or curved. Thrusting swords have a pointed tip on the blade, and tend to be straighter; slashing swords have a sharpened cutting edge on one or both sides of the blade, and are more likely to be curved. Many swords are designed for both thrusting and slashing. Historically, the sword developed in the Bronze
Bronze
Age, evolving from the dagger; the earliest specimens date to about 1600 BC. The later Iron Age sword remained fairly short and without a crossguard
[...More...]

"Sword" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Galloway Pony
The Galloway
Galloway
pony is an extinct horse breed, once native to Scotland and northern England. It was said to have "good looks, a wide, deep chest and a tendency to pace rather than trot." In the 18th century Galloways were bred in Swaledale, to haul lead ore.[1] It was a well-known type of pony, noted in English literature when Shakespeare
Shakespeare
referred to " Galloway
Galloway
nags" in Henry IV, Part 2. A survey in 1814 stated:The province of Galloway
Galloway
formerly possessed a breed of horses peculiar to itself, which were in high estimation for the saddle, being, though of a small size, exceedingly hardy and active. They were larger than the ponies of Wales, and the north of Scotland, and rose from twelve to fourteen hands in height
[...More...]

"Galloway Pony" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

David Reivers
David Reivers
David Reivers
(born 21 November 1958) is a Jamaican and the father of fellow actor Corbin Bleu. He is best known for co-starring as his real-life son's father in the Disney Channel Original Movie Jump In! and High School Musical
High School Musical
3: Senior Year, and in Free Style
[...More...]

"David Reivers" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Northumbrian Tartan
Border tartan, sometimes known as Northumbrian tartan, Shepherds' Plaid or Border Drab, or Border check is a design used in woven fabrics historically associated with the Anglo-Scottish Border, including the Scottish Borders
Scottish Borders
and Northumbria
[...More...]

"Northumbrian Tartan" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Doublet (clothing)
A doublet is a man's snug-fitting jacket that is shaped and fitted to the man's body which was worn in Spain
Spain
and was spread to Western Europe from the late Middle Ages
Middle Ages
up to the mid-17th century. The doublet was hip length or waist length and worn over the shirt or drawers. Until the end of the 15th century, the doublet was usually worn under another layer of clothing such as a gown, mantle, overtunic or jerkin when in public. Originally it was a mere stitched and quilted lining ("doubling"), worn under a hauberk or cuirass to prevent bruising and chafing. Doublets were sometimes opened to the waistline in a deep V. The edges might be left free or laced across the shirt front. If there was space left it might be filled with a stomacher. By the 1520s, the edges of the doublet more frequently met at the center front
[...More...]

"Doublet (clothing)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Morion (helmet)
A morion is a type of open helmet used from the middle 16th to early 17th centuries, usually having a flat brim and a crest from front to back. Its introduction was contemporaneous with the exploration of North, Central, and South America. Explorers like Hernando de Soto
Hernando de Soto
and Coronado may have supplied them to their foot soldiers in the 1540s.Contents1 History 2 Cabasset 3 Modern times 4 In popular culture 5 See also 6 ReferencesHistory[edit] The iconic morion, though popularly identified with early Spanish explorers and conquistadors, was not in use as early as the conquest of Mexico by Hernan Cortez
Hernan Cortez
or Francisco Pizarro's conquest of the Incas in South America
[...More...]

"Morion (helmet)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Longbow
A longbow is a type of bow that is tall – roughly equal to the height of the user – allowing the archer a fairly long draw, at least to the jaw. A longbow is not significantly recurved. Its limbs are relatively narrow so that they are circular or D-shaped in cross section. Flatbows can be just as long; the difference is that, in cross-section, a flatbow has limbs that are approximately rectangular. Longbows for hunting and warfare have been made from many different woods by many cultures; in Europe they date from the Paleolithic, and since the Bronze Age
Bronze Age
were made mainly from yew, or from wych elm if yew was unavailable
[...More...]

"Longbow" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Crossbow
A crossbow is a type of ranged weapon based on the bow and consisting of a horizontal bow-like assembly mounted on a frame which is handheld in a similar fashion to the stock of a gun. It shoots arrow-like projectiles called bolts or quarrels. The medieval crossbow was called by many names, most of which were derived from the word ballista, a torsion siege engine resembling a crossbow.[1] Historically, crossbows played a significant role in the warfare of East Asia
East Asia
and Medieval
Medieval
Europe.[2] The earliest crossbows in the world were invented in ancient China and caused a major shift in the role of projectile weaponry. The traditional bow and arrow had long been a specialized weapon that required a considerable user training, physical strength and expertise to operate with any degree of practical efficiency
[...More...]

"Crossbow" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Dirk
A dirk is a long thrusting dagger.[1] Historically, it was a personal weapon of officers engaged in naval hand-to-hand combat during the Age of Sail,[2] as well as the personal sidearm of Highlanders and from around 1800, the officers, Pipers, and Drummers of Scottish Highland regiments,[1] and Japanese naval officers.[3]Contents1 Etymology 2 Naval dirk 3 Highland dirk 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksEtymology[edit] The term is associated with Scotland in the Early Modern Era, being attested from about 1600. The term was spelled dork or dirk during the 17th century,[4] presumably from the Dutch, Swedish and Danish dolk, and German dolch, tolch from a West Slavic Tillich
[...More...]

"Dirk" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

The Great Raid Of 1322
The Great Raid of 1322 was a major raid on Northern England, carried out by Robert the Bruce
Robert the Bruce
during the First Scottish War of Independence between 30 September and 2 November 1322, resulting in the Battle of Old Byland. The raid began by attacking the area around Carlisle then crossed into Yorkshire and penetrated ultimately as far as the East Riding, resulting in property being burned and destroyed, valuables from the wealthy and abbeys being stolen, and some residents and livestock being captured and taken back to Scotland.[1] Other Scottish raids around the same time marched down from Carlisle and into Lancashire, reaching as far south as Chorley.[2] References[edit]^ McNamee, Colm (1997). The Wars of the Bruces. East Linton: Tuckwell Press. pp. 100–4. ISBN 1898410925.  ^ G. H. Tupling, ed. (1949). South Lancashire in the Reign of Eward II. Manchester University Press. p. xxxvii
[...More...]

"The Great Raid Of 1322" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Cavalry
Cavalry
Cavalry
(from French cavalerie, cf. cheval 'horse') or horsemen were soldiers or warriors who fought mounted on horseback. Cavalry
Cavalry
were historically the most mobile of the combat arms. An individual soldier in the cavalry is known by a number of designations such as cavalryman, horseman, dragoon or trooper. The designation of cavalry was not usually given to any military forces that used other animals, such as camels, mules or elephants. Infantry
Infantry
who moved on horseback, but dismounted to fight on foot, were known in the 17th and early 18th centuries as dragoons, a class of mounted infantry which later evolved into cavalry proper while retaining their historic title. Cavalry
Cavalry
had the advantage of improved mobility, and a man fighting from horseback also had the advantages of greater height, speed, and inertial mass over an opponent on foot
[...More...]

"Cavalry" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Elizabeth I Of England
Elizabeth I (7 September 1533 – 24 March 1603)[1] was Queen of England and Ireland from 17 November 1558 until her death on 24 March 1603. Sometimes called The Virgin Queen, Gloriana
Gloriana
or Good Queen Bess, Elizabeth was the last monarch of the House of Tudor. Elizabeth was the daughter of Henry VIII
Henry VIII
and Anne Boleyn, his second wife, who was executed two-and-a-half years after Elizabeth's birth. Anne's marriage to Henry VIII
Henry VIII
was annulled, and Elizabeth was declared illegitimate. Her half-brother, Edward VI, ruled until his death in 1553, bequeathing the crown to Lady Jane Grey
Lady Jane Grey
and ignoring the claims of his two half-sisters, Elizabeth and the Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
Mary, in spite of statute law to the contrary. Edward's will was set aside and Mary became queen, deposing Lady Jane Grey
[...More...]

"Elizabeth I Of England" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

James VI And I
James VI and I
James VI and I
(James Charles Stuart; 19 June 1566 – 27 March 1625) was King of Scotland
King of Scotland
as James VI from 24 July 1567 and King of England and Ireland as James I from the union of the Scottish and English crowns on 24 March 1603 until his death in 1625. The kingdoms of Scotland and England were individual sovereign states, with their own parliaments, judiciaries, and laws, though both were ruled by James in personal union. James was the son of Mary, Queen of Scots, and a great-great-grandson of Henry VII, King of England
King of England
and Lord of Ireland, positioning him to eventually accede to all three thrones. James succeeded to the Scottish throne at the age of thirteen months, after his mother was compelled to abdicate in his favour
[...More...]

"James VI And I" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Mercenaries
A mercenary[1] is a person who takes part in an armed conflict who is completely funded by the government and is "motivated to take part in the hostilities by desire for private gain".[2][3] Mercenaries fight for money or other recompense rather than for political interests. In the last century, and as reflected in the Geneva Convention, mercenaries have increasingly come to be seen as less entitled to protections by rules of war than non-mercenaries
[...More...]

"Mercenaries" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.