HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Book Of Jeremiah
The Book
Book
of Jeremiah
Jeremiah
(Hebrew: ספר יִרְמְיָהוּ‎; abbreviated Jer. or Jerm. in citations) is the second of the Latter Prophets in the Hebrew Bible, and the second of the Prophets in the Christian
Christian
Old Testament.[1] The superscription at chapter 1:1–3 identifies it as "the words of Jeremiah
Jeremiah
son of Hilkiah," and places the prophet historically from the reforms of king Josiah
Josiah
in 627 BC through to the assassination of the Babylonian-appointed governor of Judah in 582.[1] Of all the prophets, Jeremiah
Jeremiah
comes through most clearly as a person, ruminating to his scribe Baruch about his role as a servant of God with little good news for his audience.[2] Jeremiah
Jeremiah
is written in a very complex and poetic Hebrew (apart from verse 10:11, curiously written in Biblical Aramaic)
[...More...]

"Book Of Jeremiah" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Wisdom Books
Wisdom
Wisdom
literature is a genre of literature common in the ancient Near East. It consists of statements by sages and wise men that offer teachings about divinity and virtue. Although this genre uses techniques of traditional oral story-telling, it was disseminated in written form. The literary genre of mirrors for princes, which has a long history in Islamic and Western Renaissance literature, is a secular cognate of wisdom literature. In Classical Antiquity, the didactic poetry of Hesiod, particularly his Works and Days, was regarded as a source of knowledge similar to the wisdom literature of Egypt, Babylonia, and Israel.Contents1 Ancient Egyptian literature 2 Biblical wisdom literature and Jewish texts2.1 Sapiential Books2.1.1 Septuagint3 Classical texts 4 See also 5 Notes and references 6 BibliographyAncient Egyptian literature[edit] Main article: Ancient Egyptian philosophyThis section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it
[...More...]

"Wisdom Books" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tanakh
Outline of Bible-related topics   Bible
Bible
book    Bible
Bible
portalv t eThe Tanakh
Tanakh
(/tɑːˈnɑːx/;[1] תַּנַ"ךְ, pronounced [taˈnaχ] or [təˈnax]; also Tenakh, Tenak, Tanach), also called the Mikra or Hebrew Bible, is the canonical collection of Jewish texts, which is also a textual source for the Christian
Christian
Old Testament. These texts are composed mainly in Biblical Hebrew, with some passages in Biblical Aramaic (in the books of Daniel, Ezra and a few others). The traditional Hebrew text is known as the Masoretic Text
[...More...]

"Tanakh" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ketuvim
Ketuvim
Ketuvim
(/kətuːˈviːm, kəˈtuːvɪm/;[1] Biblical Hebrew: כְּתוּבִים‎ Kəṯûḇîm, "writings") is the third and final section of the Tanakh
Tanakh
(Hebrew Bible), after Torah
Torah
(instruction) and Nevi'im
Nevi'im
(prophets)
[...More...]

"Ketuvim" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Five Megillot
The Five Scrolls or The Five Megillot
Five Megillot
(Hebrew: חמש מגילות‬ [χaˈmeʃ meɡiˈlot], Hamesh Megillot or Chomeish Megillos) are parts of the Ketuvim
Ketuvim
("Writings"), the third major section of the Tanakh
Tanakh
(Hebrew Bible). The Five Scrolls are the Song of Songs, the Book of Ruth, the Book of Lamentations, Ecclesiastes
Ecclesiastes
and the Book of Esther. These five relatively short biblical books are grouped together in Jewish tradition.Contents1 History 2 Liturgical use 3 Other uses 4 Cantillation 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] An early testimony that these five scrolls were grouped together is in the Midrash
Midrash
Rabba. This midrash was compiled on the Pentateuch and on the Five Scrolls. Liturgical use[edit]A cabinet containing the five megillot
[...More...]

"Five Megillot" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Historical Books
The historical books are a division in the Christian Old Testament, corresponding to the Former Prophets of the Hebrew Nevi'im
Nevi'im
and two of the ungrouped books of Ketuvim, together with the Book of Ruth (between Judges and Samuel) and the Book of Esther
Book of Esther
<

[...More...]

"Historical Books" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ezra–Nehemiah
Ezra– Nehemiah
Nehemiah
is a book in the Hebrew Bible
Hebrew Bible
found in the Ketuvim section. The Christian scholar Origen
Origen
in the 3rd century, noting that the other Hebrew historical books; Samuel, Kings and Chronicles were 'doubled', proposed that Ezra
Ezra
too should be separated into two books, which he denoted as I Ezra
Ezra
and II Ezra, dealing respectively with the careers of Ezra
Ezra
and Nehemiah; but no surviving Christian Bibles from antiquity follow this principle. Surviving manuscripts of the Christian Old Testament, both in Greek and Old Latin consistently witness otherwise the two books of Ezra
Ezra
known as ' Esdras A' and Esdras B, corresponding respectively to Greek Esdras
Greek Esdras
and the undivided Ezra-Nehemiah
[...More...]

"Ezra–Nehemiah" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Poetic Books
The poetical books or sapiential books are a division in the Christian Old Testament, corresponding to the poetic books of the Hebrew Ketuvim and two of the Five Megillot, the Song of Songs
Song of Songs
and Ecclesiastes
[...More...]

"Poetic Books" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Torah
Outline of Bible-related topics   Bible
Bible
book    Bible
Bible
portalv t eThe Torah
Torah
(/ˈtɔːrəˌˈtoʊrə/; Hebrew: תּוֹרָה‬, "instruction, teaching") is the central reference of Judaism. It has a range of meanings. It can most specifically mean the first five books (Pentateuch) of the 24 books of the Tanakh, and is usually printed with the rabbinic commentaries (perushim)
[...More...]

"Torah" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Book Of Ezra
The Book
Book
of Ezra
Ezra
is a book of the Hebrew Bible; which formerly included the Book of Nehemiah
Book of Nehemiah
in a single book, commonly distinguished in scholarship as Ezra–Nehemiah
[...More...]

"Book Of Ezra" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Prophetic Books
The prophetic books are a division in the Christian Old Testament, corresponding to the Latter Prophets of the Hebrew Nevi'im, with the addition of Lamentions and Daniel in the Major Prophets, which in the Tanakh
Tanakh
are found in the Five Megillot
Five Megillot
and ungrouped bo
[...More...]

"Prophetic Books" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Books Of Chronicles
In the Christian Bible, the two Books of Chronicles
Books of Chronicles
(commonly referred to as 1 Chronicles and 2 Chronicles, or First Chronicles and Second Chronicles) generally follow the two Books of Kings
Books of Kings
and precede Ezra–Nehemiah, thus concluding the history-oriented books of the Old Testament,[1] often referred to as the Deuteronomistic history. In the Hebrew Bible, Chronicles is a single book, called Diḇrê Hayyāmîm (Hebrew: דִּבְרֵי־הַיָּמִים‬, "The Matters [of] the Days"), and is the final book of Ketuvim, the third and last part of the Tanakh
[...More...]

"Books Of Chronicles" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Book Of Haggai
The Book
Book
of Haggai
Haggai
is a book of the Hebrew Bible
Hebrew Bible
or Tanakh, and has its place as the third-to-last of the Minor Prophets. It is a short book, consisting of only two chapters. The historical setting dates around 520 BCE before the Temple has been rebuilt.[1] 520 BCE falls between the start of the Achaemenid Empire
Achaemenid Empire
in 539 BCE and 520 BCE, a period that saw major leaders such as Zerubbabel
Zerubbabel
help lead the Jews in their return to the land from Babylonian captivity.Contents1 Authorship 2 Date 3 Synopsis 4 Outline 5 References 6 External linksAuthorship[edit] The Book
Book
of Haggai
Haggai
is named after its presumed author, the prophet Haggai. There is no biographical information given about the prophet in the Book
Book
of Haggai
[...More...]

"Book Of Haggai" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Book Of Esther
The Book
Book
of Esther, also known in Hebrew
Hebrew
as "the Scroll" (Megillah), is a book in the third section (Ketuvim, "Writings") of the Jewish Tanakh
Tanakh
(the Hebrew
Hebrew
Bible) and in the Christian Old Testament. It is one of the five Scrolls (Megillot) in the Hebrew
Hebrew
Bible. It relates the story of a Hebrew
Hebrew
woman in Persia, born as Hadassah
Hadassah
but known as Esther, who becomes queen of Persia and thwarts a genocide of her people. The story forms the core of the Jewish festival
Jewish festival
of Purim, during which it is read aloud twice: once in the evening and again the following morning
[...More...]

"Book Of Esther" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ecclesiastes
Ecclesiastes
Ecclesiastes
(/ɪˌkliːziˈæstiːz/; Greek: Ἐκκλησιαστής, Ekklēsiastēs, Hebrew: קֹהֶלֶת‬, qōheleṯ) is one of 24 books of the Tanakh
Tanakh
or Hebrew Bible, where it is classified as one of the Ketuvim
Ketuvim
(or "Writings"). Originally written c. 450-180 BCE, it is also among the canonical Wisdom Books in the Old Testament
Old Testament
of most denominations of Christianity. The title Ecclesiastes
Ecclesiastes
is a Latin transliteration of the Greek translation of the Hebrew Kohelet, the pseudonym used by the author of the book. The book is a musing by a King of Jerusalem
Jerusalem
as he relates his experiences and draws lessons from them, often self-critical. The author, introducing himself as the son of David, discusses the meaning of life and the best way to live
[...More...]

"Ecclesiastes" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Book Of Nehemiah
The Book
Book
of Nehemiah
Nehemiah
has been, since the 16th century, a separate book of the Hebrew Bible. Before that date, it had been included in the Book
Book
of Ezra; but in Latin Christian bibles from the 13th century onwards, the Books of Ezra
Ezra
and Nehemiah
Nehemiah
become separated; a separation that became canonised with the first printed bibles in Hebrew and Latin. Told largely in the form of a first-person memoir, it concerns the rebuilding of the walls of Jerusalem
Jerusalem
by Nehemiah, a Jew who is a high official at the Persian court, and the dedication of the city and its people to God's laws (Torah).Contents1 Summary 2 Historical background 3 Textual history 4 Composition and date 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksSummary[edit] The events take place in the second half of the 5th century BC
[...More...]

"Book Of Nehemiah" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.