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Book Of Common Prayer
The BOOK OF COMMON PRAYER (BCP) is the short title of a number of related prayer books used in the Anglican Communion
Anglican Communion
, as well as by the Continuing Anglican
Continuing Anglican
, " Anglican realignment
Anglican realignment
" and other Anglican churches. The original book, published in 1549 ( Church of England
Church of England
1957 ), in the reign of Edward VI , was a product of the English Reformation following the break with Rome . Prayer books, unlike books of prayers, contain the words of structured (or liturgical ) services of worship. The work of 1549 was the first prayer book to include the complete forms of service for daily and Sunday worship in English
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Christian Church
The CHRISTIAN CHURCH is a term generally used by Protestants and some others to refer to the whole group of people belonging to the Christian
Christian
religious tradition throughout history . In this understanding, the " Christian
Christian
Church" does not refer to a particular Christian denomination but to the body of all believers; but most Christians follow the traditional Christian
Christian
understanding of the term, and believe that the term " Christian
Christian
Church" or "Church" applies only to a specific historic Christian
Christian
body or institution, namely their own (e.g., the Roman Catholic Church
Catholic Church
, the Orthodox Church , the Non-Chalcedonian Churches of Oriental Orthodoxy , or the Assyrian Church of the East )
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Christ (title)
In Christianity
Christianity
, the CHRIST (Greek word Χριστός, Christós, meaning "the anointed one") is a title for the saviour and redeemer who would bring salvation to the Jewish people
Jewish people
and mankind. Christians believe that Jesus
Jesus
is the Jewish messiah called Christ in both the Hebrew Bible
Hebrew Bible
and the Christian
Christian
Old Testament
Old Testament
. Christ, used by Christians
Christians
as both a name and a title , is synonymous with Jesus
Jesus
. The role of the Christ in Christianity
Christianity
originated from the concept of the messiah in Judaism
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Celtic Christianity
CELTIC CHRISTIANITY or INSULAR CHRISTIANITY refers broadly to certain features of Christianity
Christianity
that were common, or held to be common, across the Celtic -speaking world during the Early Middle Ages . "Celtic Christianity" has been conceived of with differing levels of specificity: some writers have described a distinct "CELTIC CHURCH" uniting the Celtic peoples and distinguishing them from the "Roman" Catholic Church
Catholic Church
, while others classify it as simply a set of distinctive practices occurring in those areas. Scholars now reject the former notion, but note that there were certain traditions and practices used in both the Irish and British churches but not in the wider Christian world
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Augustine Of Canterbury
AUGUSTINE OF CANTERBURY (born first third of the 6th century – died probably 26 May 604) was a Benedictine monk who became the first Archbishop of Canterbury in the year 597. He is considered the "Apostle to the English" and a founder of the English Church. Augustine was the prior of a monastery in Rome when Pope Gregory the Great chose him in 595 to lead a mission, usually known as the Gregorian mission
Gregorian mission
, to Britain to Christianize King Æthelberht and his Kingdom of Kent
Kent
from Anglo-Saxon paganism . Kent
Kent
was probably chosen because Æthelberht had married a Christian princess, Bertha , daughter of Charibert I the King of Paris , who was expected to exert some influence over her husband
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Architecture Of The Medieval Cathedrals Of England
The MEDIEVAL CATHEDRALS OF ENGLAND, which date from between approximately 1040 and 1540, are a group of twenty-six buildings that constitute a major aspect of the country’s artistic heritage and are among the most significant material symbols of Christianity
Christianity
. Though diversified in style, they are united by a common function. As cathedrals , each of these buildings serves as central church for an administrative region (or diocese) and houses the throne of a bishop (cathedra, from the Greek). Each cathedral also serves as a regional centre and a focus of regional pride and affection. Only sixteen of these buildings had been cathedrals at the time of the Reformation : eight that were served by secular canons, and eight that were monastic
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Bede
BEDE (/ˈbiːd/ BEED ; Old English : Bǣda or Bēda; 672/3 – 26 May 735), also known as SAINT BEDE, VENERABLE BEDE, and BEDE THE VENERABLE ( Latin
Latin
: Bēda Venerābilis), was an English monk at the monastery of St. Peter and its companion monastery of St. Paul in the Kingdom of Northumbria
Kingdom of Northumbria
of the Angles
Angles
(contemporarily Monkwearmouth– Jarrow
Jarrow
Abbey in Tyne and Wear , England
England
). He is well known as an author and scholar, and his most famous work, Ecclesiastical History of the English People
Ecclesiastical History of the English People
gained him the title "The Father of English History "
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Episcopal Polity
An EPISCOPAL POLITY is a hierarchical form of church governance ("ecclesiastical polity") in which the chief local authorities are called bishops . (The word "bishop" derives, via the British Latin and Vulgar Latin term *ebiscopus/*biscopus, from the Ancient Greek επίσκοπος epískopos meaning "overseer".) It is the structure used by many of the major Christian Churches and denominations , such as the Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
, Eastern Orthodox , Oriental Orthodox , Church of the East , Anglican and Lutheran
Lutheran
churches or denominations, and other churches founded independently from these lineages. Churches with an episcopal polity are governed by bishops, practicing their authorities in the dioceses and conferences or synods
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Jesus In Christianity
In Christianity, Jesus
Jesus
is the Messiah
Messiah
( Christ
Christ
) and through his crucifixion and resurrection , humans can be reconciled to God and thereby are offered salvation and the promise of eternal life . These teachings emphasize that as the willing Lamb of God , Jesus
Jesus
chose to suffer on the cross at Calvary
Calvary
as a sign of his full obedience to the will of God the Father , as an "agent and servant of God". The choice Jesus
Jesus
made thus counter-positions him as a new man of morality and obedience, in contrast to Adam
Adam
's disobedience. Christians believe that Jesus
Jesus
was both human and divine—the Son of God
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Paul The Apostle
PAUL THE APOSTLE ( Latin
Latin
: Paulus; Greek : Παῦλος, translit. Paulos; c. 5 – c. 67), commonly known as SAINT PAUL and also known by his native name SAUL OF TARSUS (Hebrew : שאול התרסי‎, translit. Sha'ul ha-Tarsi‎; Greek : Σαῦλος Ταρσεύς, translit. Saulos Tarseus), was an apostle (though not one of the Twelve Apostles ) who taught the gospel of the Christ
Christ
to the first century world . Paul is generally considered one of the most important figures of the Apostolic Age and in the mid-30s to the mid-50s AD he founded several churches in Asia Minor and Europe . He took advantage of his status as both a Jew
Jew
and a Roman citizen to minister to both Jewish and Roman audiences
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First Seven Ecumenical Councils
In the history of Christianity
Christianity
, the FIRST SEVEN ECUMENICAL COUNCILS, from the First Council of Nicaea (325) to the Second Council of Nicaea (787), represented an attempt by Church leaders to reach an orthodox consensus, restore peace and develop a unified Christendom . Eastern Orthodox Christians , Oriental Orthodox Christians , Nestorians , and Roman Catholics , all trace the legitimacy of their clergy by apostolic succession back to this period and beyond, to the earlier period referred to as Early Christianity . This era begins with the First Council of Nicaea, which enunciated the Nicene Creed that in its original form and as modified by the First Council of Constantinople
First Council of Constantinople
of 381 was seen by all later councils as the touchstone of orthodoxy on the doctrine of the Trinity
Trinity

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Common Prayer (band)
COMMON PRAYER are an American, Brooklyn -based indie rock band, led by Jason Sebastian Russo . They released their debut full-length album, "There Is A Mountain," in 2010 on England's Big Potato Records (founded by Neil Halstead ) in the UK, and on Russo's own South Cherry Entropy imprint of Virtual Label digitally in North America. "There Is A Mountain" was recorded in a cow barn at Hill Farm in Steventon, Oxfordshire, at the site of the Truck Festival , with significant musical contributions from Joe and Robin Bennett of Goldrush . Other players include Alexandra Marvar, as well as Justin Russo of The Silent League . The record was well received in the UK; the BBC called it "one of the year-so-far’s most recommended under-the-radar releases." In October 2013, Common Prayer released their second LP "Frame The River" with the help of the O+Festival
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Broad Church
BROAD CHURCH is a term referring to latitudinarian churchmanship in the Church of England
Church of England
in particular and Anglicanism
Anglicanism
in general. The term is often used to refer to secular political organisations, meaning that they encompass a broad range of opinion. CONTENTS * 1 Usage * 2 See also * 3 References * 4 Further reading USAGEAfter the terms high church and low church came to distinguish the tendency toward ritualism and Anglo-Catholicism on the one hand and evangelicalism on the other, those Anglicans tolerant of multiple forms of conformity to ecclesiastical authority came to be referred to as "broad". The expression apparently originated with A. H. Clough and was current in the later part of the 19th century for Anglicans who objected to positive definitions in theology and sought to interpret Anglican formularies in a broad and liberal sense
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The Books Of Homilies
THE BOOKS OF HOMILIES (1547, 1562, and 1571) are two books of thirty-three sermons developing the reformed doctrines of the Church of England in greater depth and detail than in the Thirty-Nine Articles of Religion. The title of the collection is CERTAIN SERMONS OR HOMILIES APPOINTED TO BE READ IN CHURCHES. CONTENTS * 1 Overview * 2 History and contents * 2.1 First Book of Homilies * 2.2 Second Book of Homilies * 3 See also * 4 External links OVERVIEW Title page of the 1683 reprinted edition During the reign of Edward VI
Edward VI
and later during the reign of Elizabeth I , Thomas Cranmer
Thomas Cranmer
and other English reformers saw the need for local congregations to be taught Christian theology
Christian theology
and practice
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Chicago-Lambeth Quadrilateral
The CHICAGO-LAMBETH QUADRILATERAL, frequently referred to as the LAMBETH QUADRILATERAL or the LAMBETH-CHICAGO QUADRILATERAL, is a four-point articulation of Anglican
Anglican
identity, often cited as encapsulating the fundamentals of the Communion's doctrine and as a reference-point for ecumenical discussion with other Christian denominations. The four points are: * The Holy Scriptures , as containing all things necessary to salvation; * The Creeds (specifically, the Apostles\' and Nicene Creeds), as the sufficient statement of Christian faith; * The Sacraments of Baptism
Baptism
and Holy Communion
Holy Communion
; * The historic episcopate , locally adapted.The quadrilateral had its genesis in an 1870 essay by an American Episcopal priest, William Reed Huntington
William Reed Huntington

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Oxford Movement
The OXFORD MOVEMENT was a movement of High Church members of the Church of England
Church of England
which eventually developed into Anglo-Catholicism . The movement, whose original devotees were mostly associated with the University of Oxford
University of Oxford
, argued for the reinstatement of some older Christian traditions of faith and their inclusion into Anglican liturgy and theology. They thought of Anglicanism
Anglicanism
as one of three branches of the One, Holy, Catholic, and Apostolic Church . The movement's philosophy was known as TRACTARIANISM after its series of publications, the Tracts for the Times , published from 1833 to 1841. Tractarians were also disparagingly referred to as "Newmanites" (before 1845) and "Puseyites" (after 1845) after two prominent Tractarians, John Henry Newman and Edward Bouverie Pusey
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