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Bogra District
Bogura, (Bengali: বগুড়া) formerly spelled Bogra, is a northern district of Bangladesh, in the Rajshahi
Rajshahi
Division.[1] It is called the gateway to North Bengal. Bogura
Bogura
is an industrial city where many small and mid-sized industries are sited. Bogura
Bogura
district was a part of the ancient Pundravardhana
Pundravardhana
territory and the ruins of Mahasthangarh, the ancient capital of Pundravardhana, are located north of Bogura.Contents1 History1.1 Ancient history1.1.1 The Mauryas
Mauryas
(4th century to 3rd century B.C.) 1.1.2 The Guptas
Guptas
(3rd century AD to the 5th century AD) 1.1.3 Sasanka
Sasanka
(the first quarter of the 7th century AD) 1.1.4 Harshavardhana
Harshavardhana
(the second quarter of the 7th century) 1.1.5 The Palas (c
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Naogaon
Naogaon
Naogaon
(Bengali: নওগাঁ Nôogã) is a town in northern Bangladesh. It is located in the bank of Mini Jamuna river. It is the centre of commerce within the Naogaon
Naogaon
District. The area of the town is about 38.36 km2 (14.81 sq mi) and the population is about 150,025. The municipality consists of 9 wards and 56 mahallas.Contents1 Administration 2 Annual average temperature 3 Main rivers 4 Archaeological heritage and relics 5 History 6 Marks of War of Liberation 7 Ethnic national 8 Main crops 9 Fruit production 10 Transport 11 ReferencesAdministration[edit] Naogaon
Naogaon
subdivision, under Rajshahi zila, was established in 1877 and was turned into a zila in 1984. The zila consists of 11 upazilas, 99 unions, 2565 mauzas, 2854 villages, 3 paurashavas, 27 wards and 76 mahallas
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Gauda (king)
Gauda was a king of Numidia, who reigned from 105 BC to 88 BC. He was the son of Mastanabal and a grandson of Masinissa. Gauda was thus also a half-brother of Jugurtha. He was the father of Hiempsal II and the grandfather of Juba I. According to Sallust
Sallust
during the Jugurthine War, Gauda had petitioned the Roman commander Q. Caecilius Metellus to allow him a seat, like a prince, next to himself, and a troop of horse for a bodyguard; but Metellus had refused both demands because such a seat was granted only to those whom the Roman people had addressed as kings, and the guard would be seen as an indignity to Romans
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Brahmin
ArtsBharatanatyam Kathak Kathakali Kuchipudi Manipuri Mohiniyattam Odissi Sattriya Bhagavata Mela Yakshagana Dandiya Raas Carnatic musicRites of passageGarbhadhana Pumsavana Simantonayana Jatakarma Namakarana Nishkramana Annaprashana Chudakarana Karnavedha Vidyarambha Upanayana Keshanta Ritushuddhi Samavartana Vivaha AntyeshtiAshrama DharmaAshrama: Brahmacharya Grihastha Vanaprastha SannyasaFestivalsDiwali Holi Shivaratri Navaratri Durga
Durga
Puja Ramlila Vijayadashami-DussehraRaksha Bandhan Ganesh Chat
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Kotivarsha
Bangarh
Bangarh
(Bengali: বাণগড়) is the historical place situated in Gangarampur, West Bengal, India. Bangarh
Bangarh
was the ancient city which was the administrative centre of Kotivarsha Vishaya (territorial division), itself part of the wider administrative unit of Pundravardhana
Pundravardhana
Bhukti, which had Mahasthangarh
Mahasthangarh
as its capital[1] in the period of Chandras, Varmans and Senas. After the Senas were defeated by the Muslims under Bakhtiar Khilji, Devkot
Devkot
was established as their capital were Bakhtiar breathed his last[2]Contents1 History 2 Excavations at Bangarh 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] The earliest mentions about the Kotivarsha town are found in the Vayu Purana (XXIII,209) and the Brihat Samhita (XI,II)
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Chandra Gupta Maurya
Chandragupta Maurya
Chandragupta Maurya
(reign: 321–298 BCE) was the founder of the Maurya Empire
Maurya Empire
in ancient India.[2][8] He was born in a humble family, orphaned and abandoned, raised as a son by another pastoral family, was picked up, taught and counselle
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Buddhism
Buddhism
Buddhism
(/ˈbʊdɪzəm, ˈbuː-/)[1][2] is a religion[3][4] and dharma that encompasses a variety of traditions, beliefs and spiritual practices largely based on original teachings attributed to the Buddha and resulting interpreted philosophies. Buddhism
Buddhism
originated in Ancient India
India
sometime between the 6th and 4th centuries BCE, from where it spread through much of Asia, whereafter it declined in India
India
during the Middle Ages. Two major extant branches of Buddhism
Buddhism
are generally recognized by scholars: Theravada
Theravada
(Pali: "The School of the Elders") and Mahayana
Mahayana
(Sanskrit: "The Great Vehicle")
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Sectarians
Sectarianism
Sectarianism
is a form of bigotry, discrimination, or hatred arising from attaching relations of inferiority and superiority to differences between subdivisions within a group. Common examples are denominations of a religion, ethnic identity, class, or region for citizens of a state and factions of a political movement. The ideological underpinnings of attitudes and behaviours labelled as sectarian are extraordinarily varied. Members of a religious, national or political group may believe that their own salvation, or the success of their particular objectives, requires aggressively seeking converts from other groups; adherents of a given faction may believe that for the achievement of their own political or religious project their internal opponents must be converted or purged. Sometimes a group that is under economic or political pressure will kill or attack members of another group which it regards as responsible for its own decline
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Jain
Jainism
Jainism
(/ˈdʒeɪnɪzəm/),[1] traditionally known as Jain
Jain
Dharma,[2] is an ancient Indian religion.[3] Followers of Jainism
Jainism
are called "Jains", a word derived from the Sanskrit word jina (victor) and connoting the path of victory in crossing over life's stream of rebirths through an ethical and spiritual life.[4] Jains
Jains
trace their history through a succession of twenty-four victorious saviors and teachers known as tirthankaras, with the first being Rishabhanatha, who is believed to have lived millions of years ago, and twenty-fourth being the Mahāvīra
Mahāvīra
around 500 BCE
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Gupta Empire
The Gupta Empire
Empire
was an ancient Indian empire, which existed at its zenith from approximately 240 to 605 CE and covered much of the Indian subcontinent.[1] This period is called the Golden Age
Golden Age
of India.[2][note 1] The ruling dynasty of the empire was founded by Sri Gupta; the most notable rulers of the dynasty were Chandragupta I, Samudragupta, and Chandragupta II. The 5th-century CE Sanskrit
Sanskrit
poet Kalidasa
Kalidasa
credits the Guptas with having conquered about twenty-one kingdoms, both in and outside India, including the kingdoms of Parasikas, the Hunas, the Kambojas, tribes located in the west and east Oxus
Oxus
valleys, the Kinnaras, Kiratas, and others.[4][non-primary source needed] The high points of this period are the great cultural developments which took place during the reign of Chandragupta II
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Guptas
The Gupta Empire was an ancient Indian empire, which existed at its zenith from approximately 240 to 605 CE and covered much of the Indian subcontinent.[1] This period is called the Golden Age of India.[2][note 1] The ruling dynasty of the empire was founded by Sri Gupta; the most notable rulers of the dynasty were Chandragupta I, Samudragupta, and Chandragupta II. The 5th-century CE Sanskrit poet Kalidasa credits the Guptas with having conquered about twenty-one kingdoms, both in and outside India, including the kingdoms of Parasikas, the Hunas, the Kambojas, tribes located in the west and east Oxus valleys, the Kinnaras, Kiratas, and others.[4][non-primary source needed] The high points of this period are the great cultural developments which took place during the reign of Chandragupta II
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Gauḍa Region
Gauda (Bengali: গৌড়), was a territory located in Bengal
Bengal
in ancient and medieval times,[1][2] as part of the Gauda Kingdom. Location and extent[edit] The Arthashastra
Arthashastra
of Chanakya
Chanakya
(around 350–-283 BC) refers to it along with Vanga, Pundra and Kamarupa
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Sasanka
King Shashanka (IAST: Śaśāṃka) created the first separate political entity in the Bengal region of the Indian subcontinent, called the Gauda Kingdom and is a major figure in Bengali history. He reigned in 7th century AD, and some historians place his rule approximately between 590 AD and 625 AD. He is the contemporary of Harsha and of Bhaskaravarman of Kamarupa. His capital was at Karnasubarna, in present-day Murshidabad in West Bengal
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Harshavardhana
Harsha
Harsha
(c. 590–647 CE), also known as Harshavardhana, was an Indian emperor who ruled North India
North India
from 606 to 647 CE. He was a member of the Pushyabhuti dynasty; and was the son of Prabhakarvardhana who defeated the Alchon Huna invaders,[2] and the younger brother of Rajyavardhana, a king of Thanesar, present-day Haryana
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Bhadra
name = Bhadra affiliation = Devi abode = Alkapuri god_of = Goddess of Hunt and Bhadrakaal mantra = Om Bhadraya Namah consort = Kubera parents = Surya
Surya
and Chhaya siblings = Shani,Tapi river,YamiYama,Ashvins In Hinduism, Bhadra is a goddess of the hunt and one of Shiva's Gana. The queen of the Lord Kuber was Bhadra, the daughter of lord Suryadev and sister of Shani
Shani
. It is believed that she was filled with halahal or poison . [1] Bhadra[edit] Bhadra is the daughter of Surya
Surya
and Chhaya. The god Varuna, who had formerly been enamoured of her, carried her off from Utathya's hermitage, and would not give her up to Narada, who was sent to bring her back. Utathya, greatly enraged, drank up all the sea, still, Varuna
Varuna
would not let her go
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Xuanzang
Xuanzang
Xuanzang
(Chinese: 玄奘; pinyin: xuánzàng; Wade–Giles: Hsüan-tsang; Mandarin: [ɕɥɛ̌ntsâŋ]; fl. c. 602–664) was a Chinese Buddhist monk, scholar, traveller, and translator who travelled to India
India
in the seventh century and described the interaction between Chinese Buddhism
Buddhism
and Indian Buddhism
Buddhism
during the early Tang dynasty.[1][2] Born in what is now Henan
Henan
province around 602, from boyhood he took to reading religious books, including the Chinese classics and the writings of ancient sages. While residing in the city of Luoyang
Luoyang
(in Henan
Henan
in Central China), Xuanzang
Xuanzang
was ordained as a śrāmaṇera (novice monk) at the age of thirteen
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