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Boeing 777
The Boeing
Boeing
777 is a family of long-range wide-body twin-engine jet airliners developed and manufactured by Boeing
Boeing
Commercial Airplanes. It is the world's largest twinjet and has a typical seating capacity of 314 to 396 passengers, with a range of 5,240 to 8,555 nautical miles (9,704 to 15,844 km). Commonly referred to as the "Triple Seven",[4][5] its distinguishing features include the largest-diameter turbofan engines of any aircraft, long raked wings, six wheels on each main landing gear, fully circular fuselage cross-section,[6] and a blade-shaped tail cone.[7] Developed in consultation with eight major airlines, the 777 was designed to replace older wide-body airliners and bridge the capacity difference between Boeing's 767 and 747. As Boeing's first fly-by-wire airliner, it has computer-mediated controls
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B777 Road
B roads are numbered routes in Great Britain
Great Britain
of lesser importance than A roads
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Computer-aided Design
Computer-aided design
Computer-aided design
(CAD) is the use of computer systems (or workstations) to aid in the creation, modification, analysis, or optimization of a design.[1] CAD software is used to increase the productivity of the designer, improve the quality of design, improve communications through documentation, and to create a database for manufacturing.[2] CAD output is often in the form of electronic files for print, machining, or other manufacturing operations. The term CADD (for Computer Aided Design
Design
and Drafting) is also used.[3] Its use in designing electronic systems is known as electronic design automation, or EDA
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McDonnell Douglas DC-10
Kelowna Flightcraft Air Charter Orbis InternationalProduced 1968–1988Number builtDC-10: 386[1] KC-10: 60[1]Unit costUS$20M (1972)[2]Variants McDonnell Douglas
McDonnell Douglas
KC-10 Extender DC-10 Air TankerDeveloped into McDonnell Douglas
McDonnell Douglas
MD-11The McDonnell Douglas
McDonnell Douglas
DC-10 is a three-engine wide-body jet airliner manufactured by McDonnell Douglas. It features two turbofan engines mounted on underwing pylons and a third engine at the base of the vertical stabilizer. The DC-10 has range for medium- to long-haul flights, capable of carrying a maximum of 380 passengers. The DC-10 was intended as a successor to the McDonnell Douglas's DC-8 for long-range operations, using a wide-body layout to greatly increase the capacity of the aircraft
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Operating Cost
Operating (Operational) costs are the expenses which are related to the operation of a business, or to the operation of a device, component, piece of equipment or facility. They are the cost of resources used by an organization just to maintain its existence.Contents1 Business operating costs 2 Business overhead costs 3 Equipment operating costs 4 ReferencesBusiness operating costs[edit] For a commercial enterprise, operating costs fall into three broad categories:fixed costs, which are the same whether the operation is closed or running at 100% capacity. Fixed Costs include items such as the rent of the building. These generally have to be paid regardless of what state the business is in. it never changes variable costs, which may increase depending on whether more production is done, and how it is done (producing 100 items of product might require 10 days of normal time or take 7 days if overtime is used
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Cockpit
A cockpit or flight deck is the area, usually near the front of an aircraft or spacecraft, from which a pilot controls the aircraft. Cockpit
Cockpit
of an Antonov An-124 Cockpit
Cockpit
of an A380. Most Airbus cockpits are glass cockpits featuring fly-by-wire technology.Swiss HB-IZX Saab 2000
Saab 2000
during flightRobin DR4001936 de Havilland Hornet MothThe cockpit of an aircraft contains flight instruments on an instrument panel, and the controls that enable the pilot to fly the aircraft. In most airliners, a door separates the cockpit from the aircraft cabin
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Fuel Efficiency
Fuel
Fuel
efficiency is a form of thermal efficiency, meaning the ratio from effort to result of a process that converts chemical potential energy contained in a carrier (fuel) into kinetic energy or work. Overall fuel efficiency may vary per device, which in turn may vary per application fuel efficiency, especially fossil fuel power plants or industries dealing with combustion, such as ammonia production during the Haber process. In the context of transport, fuel economy is the energy efficiency of a particular vehicle, given as a ratio of distance traveled per unit of fuel consumed. It is dependent on engine efficiency, transmission design, and tire design. Fuel
Fuel
economy is expressed in miles per gallon (mpg) in the USA and usually also in the UK (imperial gallon); there is sometimes confusion as the imperial gallon is 20% larger than the US gallon
US gallon
so that mpg values are not directly comparable
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Diversion Airport
Diversion airports are airports capable of handling a particular ETOPS rated aircraft during an emergency landing and whose flying distance at the point of emergency shall not exceed the ETOPS
ETOPS
diversion period for that aircraft. Any airport designated as an en route diversion airport must have the facilities to safely support that particular aircraft, and weather conditions at the time of arrival must allow a safe landing with an engine and/or systems malfunctioning.[1] An ETOPS/LROPS flight may be conducted solely if the diversion airports are available throughout the length of the flight. Unavailability due to bad
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US$
 United States  East Timor[2][Note 1]  Ecuador[3][Note 2]  El Salvador[4]  Federated States of Micronesia  Marshall Islands  Palau  Panama[Note 3]  Zimbabwe[Note 4]3 non-U.S
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Hull Loss
A hull loss is an aviation accident that damages the aircraft beyond economical repair,[2] resulting in a write-off. The term also applies to situations when the aircraft is missing, the search for its wreckage is terminated or when the wreckage is completely inaccessible.[3] "Hull losses per 100,000 flight departures" has been a long-used statistical criterion.[2] From 1959 to 2006, throughout almost the entire jet aircraft era, 384 of 835 hull losses, or 46%, were nonfatal.[4] Airlines typically buy insurance to cover hull loss on a 12-month basis. Before the September 11 attacks
September 11 attacks
in 2001, the typical insurance amount for hull loss could reach $250 million, but since then demands for higher liability have increased. Constructive hull loss factors other incidental expenses beyond repair, such as salvage, logistical costs of repairing the non-airworthy aircraft within the confines of the incident site, recertifying the aircraft, etc
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Non-stop Flight
A non-stop flight is a flight by an aircraft with no intermediate stops.Contents1 History 2 Compare 3 See also 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] The dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991 eventually opened up Russian airspace, allowing commercial airlines to exploit new circumpolar routes and enabling many new non-stop services.[1] In the late 2000s to early 2010s, rising fuel prices coupled with economic crisis resulted in cancellation of many ultra-long haul non-stop flights.[2] As fuel prices fell and aircraft became more economical the economic viability of ultra long haul flights improved.[2] Compare[edit]Direct flightSee also[edit]Aviation portalDomestic flight Flight
Flight
length ETOPS/LROPS International flight Mainline World's busiest passenger air routesNotes[edit]References[edit]^ "From Newark Over the North Pole". New York Times
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Range (aircraft)
The maximal total range is the maximum distance an aircraft can fly between takeoff and landing, as limited by fuel capacity in powered aircraft, or cross-country speed and environmental conditions in unpowered aircraft. The range can be seen as the cross-country ground speed multiplied by the maximum time in the air. The fuel time limit for powered aircraft is fixed by the fuel load and rate of consumption. When all fuel is consumed, the engines stop and the aircraft will lose its propulsion. Ferry range means the maximum range the aircraft can fly. This usually means maximum fuel load, optionally with extra fuel tanks and minimum equipment. It refers to transport of aircraft without any passengers or cargo. Combat range is the maximum range the aircraft can fly when carrying ordnance
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Nautical Mile
A nautical mile is a unit of measurement defined as 1,852 metres (6,076.1 ft; 1.1508 mi). Historically, it was defined as one minute of latitude, which is equivalent to one sixtieth of a degree of latitude. Today, it is a non-SI unit "accepted for use with the SI",[1] for its continued use in both air and marine navigation,[2] and for the definition of territorial waters.[3] One tenth of a nautical mile is a cable length.[4] The derived unit of speed is the knot, defined as one nautical mile per hour
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Airbus A300
The Airbus
Airbus
A300 is a wide-body twin-engine jet airliner that was developed and manufactured by Airbus. Formally announced in 1969 and first flying in October 1972, it holds the distinction of being the world's first twin-engined widebody airliner; it was also the first product of Airbus
Airbus
Industrie, a consortium of European aerospace manufacturers, now a subsidiary of Airbus. The A300 can typically seat 266 passengers in a two-class layout, with a maximum range of 4,070 nautical miles (7,540 km) when fully loaded, depending on model. Development of the A300 began during the 1960s as a European collaborative project between various aircraft manufacturers in the United Kingdom, France, and West Germany. In September 1967, the participating nations signed a Memorandum of Understanding to manufacture the aircraft. The British withdrew from the project on 10 April 1969
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Landing Gear
Landing
Landing
gear is the undercarriage of an aircraft or spacecraft and may be used for either takeoff or landing. For aircraft it is generally both. For aircraft, the landing gear supports the craft when it is not flying, allowing it to take off, land, and taxi without damage. Wheels are typically used but skids, skis, floats or a combination of these and other elements can be deployed depending both on the surface and on whether the craft only operates vertically (VTOL) or is able to taxi along the surface
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Glass Cockpit
A glass cockpit is an aircraft cockpit that features electronic (digital) flight instrument displays, typically large LCD screens, rather than the traditional style of analog dials and gauges. While a traditional cockpit (nicknamed a "steam cockpit" within aviation circles) relies on numerous mechanical gauges to display information, a glass cockpit uses several displays driven by flight management systems, that can be adjusted (multi-function display) to display flight information as needed. This simplifies aircraft operation and navigation and allows pilots to focus only on the most pertinent information. They are also popular with airline companies as they usually eliminate the need for a flight engineer, saving costs. In recent years the technology has become widely available in small aircraft. As aircraft displays have modernized, the sensors that feed them have modernized as well
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