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Boeing 747
The Boeing
Boeing
747 is an American wide-body commercial jet airliner and cargo aircraft, often referred to by its original nickname, "Jumbo Jet". Its distinctive "hump" upper deck along the forward part of the aircraft has made it one of the most recognizable aircraft,[7] and it was the first wide-body airplane produced. Manufactured by Boeing's Commercial Airplane unit in the United States, the 747 was originally envisioned to have 150 percent greater capacity than the Boeing 707,[8] a common large commercial aircraft of the 1960s
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Flap (aircraft)
Flaps are a type of high-lift device used to increase the lift of an aircraft wing at a given airspeed. Flaps are usually mounted on the wing trailing edges of a fixed-wing aircraft. Flaps are used to lower the minimum speed at which the aircraft can be safely flown, and to increase the angle of descent for landing. Flaps also cause an increase in drag, so they are retracted when not needed. Extending the wing flaps increases the camber or curvature of the wing, raising the maximum lift coefficient or the upper limit to the lift a wing can generate. This allows the aircraft to generate the required lift at a lower speed, reducing the stalling speed of the aircraft, and therefore also the minimum speed at which the aircraft will safely maintain flight. The increase in camber also increases the wing drag, which can be beneficial during approach and landing, because it slows the aircraft
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Martin Marietta
The Martin Marietta Corporation was an American company founded in 1961 through the merger of Glenn L. Martin Company
Glenn L. Martin Company
and American Marietta Corporation.[1] The combined company became a leader in chemicals, aerospace, and electronics.[1] In 1995, it merged with Lockheed Corporation
Lockheed Corporation
to form Lockheed Martin.[2]Contents1 History1.1 Timeline2 Products2.1 Aircraft 2.2 Missiles and rockets 2.3 Spacecraft 2.4 Unmanned Aerial Vehicles3 See also 4 ReferencesHistory[edit] Martin Marietta formed in 1961 by the merger of the Glenn L. Martin Company and American-Marietta Corporation. Martin, based in Baltimore, was primarily an aerospace concern with a recent focus on missiles, namely its Titan program
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Mach Number
In fluid dynamics, the Mach number
Mach number
(M or Ma) (/mɑːx/; German: [maχ]) is a dimensionless quantity representing the ratio of flow velocity past a boundary to the local speed of sound.[1][2] M = u c , displaystyle mathrm M = frac u c , where:M is the Mach number, u is the local flow velocity with respect to the boundaries (either internal, such as an object immersed in the flow, or external, like a channel), and c is the speed of sound in the medium.By definition, at Mach 1 the local flow velocity u is equal to the speed of sound
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Nautical Mile
A nautical mile is a unit of measurement defined as 1,852 metres (6,076.1 ft; 1.1508 mi). Historically, it was defined as one minute of latitude, which is equivalent to one sixtieth of a degree of latitude. Today, it is a non-SI unit "accepted for use with the SI",[1] for its continued use in both air and marine navigation,[2] and for the definition of territorial waters.[3] One tenth of a nautical mile is a cable length.[4] The derived unit of speed is the knot, defined as one nautical mile per hour
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United States Air Force
Department of Defense Department of the Air ForceHeadquarters The Pentagon Arlington County, Virginia, U.S.Motto(s) "Aim High ... Fly-Fight-Win"[7] "Integrity first, Service before self, Excellence in all we do"[8]Colors Ultramarine
Ultramarine
blue, Golden yellow[9]          March The U.S. Air Force
U.S. Air Force
 Play (help·info)Anniversaries 18 SeptemberEngagementsSee listMexican Expedition (As Aviation Section, U.S. Signal Corps) World War I
World War I
(As Aviation Section, U.S. Signal Corps
Aviation Section, U.S

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Douglas Aircraft Company
The Douglas Aircraft
Aircraft
Company was an American aerospace manufacturer based in Southern California. It was founded in 1921 by Donald Wills Douglas, Sr. and later merged with McDonnell Aircraft
McDonnell Aircraft
in 1967 to form McDonnell Douglas. Douglas Aircraft
Aircraft
Company largely operated as a division of McDonnell Douglas
McDonnell Douglas
(MD) after the company mergers
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General Dynamics
General Dynamics
General Dynamics
Corporation
Corporation
(GD) is an American aerospace and defense multinational corporation formed by mergers and divestitures. It is the world's fifth-largest defense contractor based on 2012 revenues.[2] General Dynamics
General Dynamics
is headquartered in West Falls Church, Fairfax County, Virginia.[3][4][5] The company has changed markedly in the post–Cold War era of defense consolidation. It has four main business segments: Marine Systems, Combat Systems, Information Systems Technology, and Aerospace. General Dynamics' former Fort Worth Division manufactured the F-16 Fighting Falcon until 1993, which was one of the Western world's most-produced jet fighters
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Lockheed Corporation
The Lockheed Corporation
Lockheed Corporation
was an American aerospace company. Lockheed was founded in 1926 and later merged with Martin Marietta to form Lockheed Martin
Lockheed Martin
in 1995
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Curtiss-Wright
US$ 2.11 billion (FY 2016) [1]Operating incomeUS$ 308 millionNumber of employees8,000 (2017)Website www.curtisswright.comThe Curtiss-Wright
Curtiss-Wright
Corporation is an American-based, global diversified product manufacturer and service provider for the commercial, industrial, defense, and energy markets. Created in 1929 from the consolidation of Curtiss Aeroplane and Motor Company, (founded January 1916 by Glenn Hammond Curtiss) Wright Aeronautical (founded by Glenn L. Martin
Glenn L. Martin
and Orville Wright
Orville Wright
as Wright-Martin), and various supplier companies, by the end of World War II
World War II
it was the largest aircraft manufacturer in the United States, supplying whole aircraft in large numbers to the U.S. Armed Forces
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Subsonic Airliner
A subsonic aircraft is an aircraft with a maximum speed less than the speed of sound (Mach 1). The term technically describes an aircraft that flies below its critical Mach number, typically around Mach 0.8. All current civil aircraft, including airliners, helicopters and airships, as well as many military types, are subsonic.Contents1 Characteristics1.1 Subsonic aerodynamics 1.2 Propulsion2 Wing design 3 References3.1 Citations 3.2 Bibliography4 See alsoCharacteristics[edit] Although high speeds are usually desirable in an aircraft, supersonic flight requires much bigger engines, higher fuel consumption and more advanced materials than subsonic flight
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Pratt & Whitney
Pratt & Whitney is an American aerospace manufacturer with global service operations. It is a subsidiary of United Technologies
United Technologies
(UTC). Pratt & Whitney's aircraft engines are widely used in both civil aviation (especially airlines) and military aviation. Its headquarters are in East Hartford, Connecticut.[2] As one of the "big three" aero-engine manufacturers, it competes with General Electric and Rolls-Royce, although it has also formed joint ventures with both of these companies. In addition to aircraft engines, Pratt & Whitney manufactures gas turbines for industrial and power generation, and marine turbines. As of 2014, the company reported having 31,500 employees supporting more than 11,000 customers in 180 countries around the world
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Containerization
Containerization
Containerization
is a system of intermodal freight transport using intermodal containers (also called shipping containers and ISO containers).[1] The containers have standardized dimensions. They can be loaded and unloaded, stacked, transported efficiently over long distances, and transferred from one mode of transport to another—container ships, rail transport flatcars, and semi-trailer trucks—without being opened. The handling system is completely mechanized so that all handling is done with cranes [2] and special forklift trucks
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Intercontinental Ballistic Missile
An intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) is a guided ballistic missile with a minimum range of 5,500 kilometres (3,400 mi)[1] primarily designed for nuclear weapons delivery (delivering one or more thermonuclear warheads). Similarly, conventional, chemical, and biological weapons can also be delivered with varying effectiveness, but have never been deployed on ICBMs. Most modern designs support multiple independently targetable reentry vehicles (MIRVs), allowing a single missile to carry several warheads, each of which can strike a different target. Early ICBMs had limited precision, which made them suitable for use only against the largest targets, such as cities. They were seen as a "safe" basing option, one that would keep the deterrent force close to home where it would be difficult to attack. Attacks against military targets (especially hardened ones) still demanded the use of a more precise manned bomber
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Turbojet
The turbojet is an airbreathing jet engine, typically used in aircraft. It consists of a gas turbine with a propelling nozzle. The gas turbine has an air inlet, a compressor, a combustion chamber, and a turbine (that drives the compressor). The compressed air from the compressor is heated by the fuel in the combustion chamber and then allowed to expand through the turbine. The turbine exhaust is then expanded in the propelling nozzle where it is accelerated to high speed to provide thrust.[1] Two engineers, Frank Whittle
Frank Whittle
in the United Kingdom and Hans von Ohain
Hans von Ohain
in Germany, developed the concept independently into practical engines during the late 1930s. Turbojets have been replaced in slower aircraft by turboprops because they have better range-specific fuel consumption. At medium speeds, where the propeller is no longer efficient, turboprops have been replaced by turbofans
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Fault Tree Analysis
Fault tree analysis
Fault tree analysis
(FTA) is a top-down, deductive failure analysis in which an undesired state of a system is analyzed using Boolean logic to combine a series of lower-level events. This analysis method is mainly used in the fields of safety engineering and reliability engineering to understand how systems can fail, to identify the best ways to reduce risk or to determine (or get a feeling for) event rates of a safety accident or a particular system level (functional) failure
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