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Body Proportions
While there is significant variation in anatomical proportions between people, there are many references to body proportions that are intended to be canonical, either in art, measurement, or medicine. In measurement, body proportions are often used to relate two or more measurements based on the body. A cubit, for instance, is supposed to be six palms. A span is taken to be 9 inches and was previously considered as half a cubit. While convenient, these ratios may not reflect the physiognomic variation of the individuals using them. Similarly, in art, body proportions are the study of relation of human or animal body parts to each other and to the whole
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Madonna With The Long Neck
The Madonna with the Long Neck
Madonna with the Long Neck
(Italian: Madonna dal collo lungo), also known as Madonna and Child
Madonna and Child
with Angels and St. Jerome, is an Italian Mannerist oil painting by the painter Parmigianino, dating from c. 1535-1540 and depicting Madonna and Child
Madonna and Child
with angels. The painting was begun in 1534 for the funerary chapel of Francesco Tagliaferri[1] in Parma, but remained incomplete on Parmigianino's death in 1540. Ferdinando de' Medici, Grand Prince of Tuscany purchased it in 1698 and it has been on display at the Uffizi
Uffizi
since 1948.[2] Description[edit] The painting depicts the Virgin Mary
Virgin Mary
seated on a high pedestal in luxurious robes, holding a rather large baby Jesus on her lap
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Body Shape
Human body shape is a complex phenomenon with sophisticated detail and function. The general shape or figure of a person is defined mainly by the molding of skeletal structures, as well as the distribution of muscles and fat.[1] Skeletal structure grows and changes only up to the point at which a human reaches adulthood and remains essentially the same for the rest of his or her life
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Doryphoros
The Doryphoros
Doryphoros
(Greek Δορυφόρος Classical Greek Greek pronunciation: [dorypʰóros], "Spear-Bearer"; Latinised as Doryphorus) of Polykleitos
Polykleitos
is one of the best known Greek sculptures of classical antiquity, depicting a solidly-built, well-muscled standing warrior, originally bearing a spear balanced on his left shoulder
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Geometric Series
In mathematics, a geometric series is a series with a constant ratio between successive terms. For example, the series 1 2 + 1 4 + 1 8 + 1 16 + ⋯ displaystyle frac 1 2 ,+, frac 1 4 ,+, frac 1 8 ,+, frac 1 16 ,+,cdots is geometric, because each successive term can be obtained by multiplying the previous term by 1/2. Geometric series
Geometric series
are among the simplest examples of infinite series with finite sums, although not all of them have this property. Historically, geometric series played an important role in the early development of calculus, and they continue to be central in the study of convergence of series
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Distal Phalanges
The phalanges /fəˈlændʒiːz/ (singular: phalanx /ˈfælæŋks/) are digital bones in the hands and feet of most vertebrates. In primates, the thumbs and big toes have two phalanges while the other digits have three phalanges. The phalanges are classed as long bones.Contents1 Structure1.1 Bone
Bone
anatomy1.1.1 Distal phalanx1.2 Development2 Function 3 History of phalanges3.1 In animals3.1.1 Primates 3.1.2 Other mammals4 Additional images 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksStructure[edit]Bones of footThe phalanges are the bones that make up the fingers of the hand and the toes of the foot. There are 56 phalanges in the human body, with fourteen on each hand and foot. Three phalanges are present on each finger and toe, with the exception of the thumb and large toe, which possess only two
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Little Finger
The little finger or pinky finger, also known as the fifth digit or just pinky, is the most ulnar and usually smallest finger of the human hand, opposite the thumb, and next to the ring finger.Contents1 Etymology 2 Muscles 3 Cultural significance3.1 Gestures 3.2 Rings4 References 5 See alsoEtymology[edit] The word "pinky" is derived from the Dutch word pink, meaning "little finger"
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Gottfried Bammes
Gottfried Bammes (26 April 1920 – 14 May 2007) was a professor of art at the Dresden Academy of Fine Arts, Germany
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
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Anthropometry
Anthropometry
Anthropometry
(from Greek ἄνθρωπος anthropos, "human", and μέτρον metron, "measure") refers to the measurement of the human individual. An early tool of physical anthropology, it has been used for identification, for the purposes of understanding human physical variation, in paleoanthropology and in various attempts to correlate physical with racial and psychological traits. Anthropometry
Anthropometry
involves the systematic measurement of the physical properties of the human body, primarily dimensional descriptors of body size and shape.[1] Today, anthropometry plays an important role in industrial design, clothing design, ergonomics and architecture where statistical data about the distribution of body dimensions in the population are used to optimize products. Changes in lifestyles, nutrition, and ethnic composition of populations lead to changes in the distribution of body dimensions (e.g
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Jessica Alba
Jessica Marie Alba (/ˈælbə/; born April 28, 1981)[2] is an American actress and businesswoman.[3][4][5] She began her television and movie appearances at age 13 in Camp Nowhere
Camp Nowhere
and The Secret World of Alex Mack (1994), but rose to prominence at 19 years old as lead actress in the television series Dark Angel (2000–02), for which she received a Golden Globe nomination.[6][7][8] She later appeared in Honey (2003), Sin City, Fantastic Four, Into the Blue (2005), Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer (2007) and Good Luck Chuck.[9] Alba has won various awards for her acting, including the Choice Actress
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Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
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PubMed Central
PubMed
PubMed
Central (PMC) is a free digital repository that archives publicly accessible full-text scholarly articles that have been published within the biomedical and life sciences journal literature. As one of the major research databases within the suite of resources that have been developed by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), PubMed
PubMed
Central is much more than just a document repository
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PubMed Identifier
PubMed
PubMed
is a free search engine accessing primarily the MEDLINE database of references and abstracts on life sciences and biomedical topics. The United States National Library of Medicine
United States National Library of Medicine
(NLM) at the National Institutes of Health
National Institutes of Health
maintains the database as part of the Entrez
Entrez
system of information retrieval. From 1971 to 1997, MEDLINE online access to the MEDLARS Online computerized database primarily had been through institutional facilities, such as university libraries
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JSTOR
JSTOR
JSTOR
(/ˈdʒeɪstɔːr/ JAY-stor;[3] short for Journal Storage) is a digital library founded in 1995. Originally containing digitized back issues of academic journals, it now also includes books and primary sources, and current issues of journals.[4] It provides full-text searches of almost 2,000 journals.[5] As of 2013, more than 8,000 institutions in more than 160 countries had access to JSTOR;[5] most access is by subscription, but some older public domain content is freely available to anyone.[6] JSTOR's revenue was $69 million in 2014.[7]Contents1 History 2 Content 3 Access3.1 Aaron Swartz
Aaron Swartz
incident 3.2 Limitations 3.3 Increasing public access4 Use 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksHistory[edit] William G
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