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Bodleian Library
The Bodleian Library
Bodleian Library
(/ˈbɒdliən, bɒdˈliːən/) is the main research library of the University of Oxford, and is one of the oldest libraries in Europe. With over 12 million items,[1] it is the second-largest library in Britain after the British Library
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Classical Architecture
Classical architecture
Classical architecture
usually denotes architecture which is more or less consciously derived from the principles of Greek and Roman architecture of classical antiquity, or sometimes even more specifically, from the works of Vitruvius.[1][2] Different styles of classical architecture have arguably existed since the Carolingian Renaissance,[3] and prominently since the Italian Renaissance. Although classical styles of architecture can vary greatly, they can in general all be said to draw on a common "vocabulary" of decorative and constructive elements.[4][5][6] In much of the Western world, dif
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Research Library
A research library is a library which contains an in-depth collection of material on one or several subjects (Young, 1983; p.188). A research library will generally include primary sources as well as secondary sources. Large university libraries are considered research libraries, and often contain many specialized branch research libraries. Research libraries can be either reference libraries, which do not lend their holdings, or lending libraries, which do lend all or some of their holdings
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Reformation
The Reformation, or, more fully, the Protestant
Protestant
Reformation, was a schism in Western Christianity
Christianity
initiated by Martin Luther
Martin Luther
and continued by John Calvin, Huldrych Zwingli, Jacobus Arminius
Jacobus Arminius
and other Protestant Reformers
Protestant Reformers
in 16th-century Europe. It is usually considered to have started with the publication of the Ninety-five Theses
Ninety-five Theses
by Martin Luther
Martin Luther
in 1517 and lasted until the end of the Thirty Years' War in 1648. Although there had been earlier attempts to reform the Catholic Church – such as those of Jan Hus, Peter Waldo, John Wycliffe, and Girolamo Savonarola – Luther is widely acknowledged to have started the Reformation
Reformation
with the Ninety-five Theses
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Edward VI
Edward VI (12 October 1537 – 6 July 1553) was King of England
King of England
and Ireland from 28 January 1547 until his death. He was crowned on 20 February at the age of nine.[1] Edward was the son of Henry VIII
Henry VIII
and Jane Seymour, and England's first monarch to be raised as a Protestant. During his reign, the realm was governed by a Regency Council because he never reached his majority. The Council was first led by his uncle Edward Seymour, 1st Duke of Somerset
Edward Seymour, 1st Duke of Somerset
(1547–1549), and then by John Dudley, 1st Earl of Warwick
Earl of Warwick
(1550–1553), from 1551 Duke of Northumberland. Edward's reign was marked by economic problems and social unrest that in 1549 erupted into riot and rebellion
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Henry V Of England
Henry V (9 August 1386 – 31 August 1422[1][2]) was King of England from 1413 until his death at the age of 36 in 1422. He was the second English monarch of the House of Lancaster. In his youth, Henry gained military experience fighting the Welsh during the revolt of Owain Glyndŵr, and against the powerful aristocratic House of Percy
House of Percy
of Northumberland, at the Battle of Shrewsbury. Henry later came into political conflict with his father, Henry IV, whose health was increasingly precarious from 1405 onward, and who had consequently started to withdraw from government functions. After his father's death in 1413, Henry assumed control of the country, and asserted the pending English claims to the French throne. In 1415, Henry embarked on war with France in the ongoing Hundred Years' War (1337–1453) between the two nations
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Chained Library
A chained library is a library where the books are attached to their bookcase by a chain, which is sufficiently long to allow the books to be taken from their shelves and read, but not removed from the library itself. This would prevent theft of the library's materials.[1] However, it also led to crowding and awkwardness when readers had to stand side by side, each holding a book or clumping so they could share one.[2] The practice was usual for reference libraries (that is, the vast majority of libraries) from the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
to approximately the 18th century. However, since the chaining process was also expensive, it was not used on all books.[3] Only the more valuable books in a collection were chained.[3] This included reference books and large books.[3] It is standard for chained libraries to have the chain fitted to the corner or cover of a book
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Bishop Of Worcester
The Bishop of Worcester
Worcester
is the head of the Church of England
Church of England
Diocese of Worcester
Worcester
in the Province of Canterbury, England. The title can be traced back to the foundation of the diocese in the year 680.[2][3] From then until the 16th century, the bishops were in full communion with the Roman Catholic Church. During the Reformation, the church in England
England
broke away from the authority of the Pope
Pope
and the Roman Catholic Church, at first temporarily and later more permanently
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Thomas Cobham
Thomas Cobham (died 1327) was an English churchman, who was Archbishop-elect of Canterbury
Canterbury
in 1313 and later Bishop of Worcester from 1317 to 1327. Cobham earned a Doctor of Theology
Theology
and a Doctor of Canon Law[1] and served as Archdeacon of Lewes from 1301 to around 1305.[2] Cobham was nominated to replace Archbishop Robert Winchelsey
Robert Winchelsey
in 1313, by the monks of Christ Church Priory, Canterbury.[3] The election took place on 28 May 1313.[4] King Edward II intervened and petitioned the pope to appoint the Bishop of Worcester – Walter Reynolds
Walter Reynolds
to Canterbury
Canterbury
instead of Cobham
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Michaelmas Term
Michaelmas
Michaelmas
term is the first academic term of the academic year in a number of English-speaking universities and schools in the northern hemisphere, especially in the United Kingdom. Michaelmas
Michaelmas
term derives its name from the Feast of St Michael and All Angels, which falls on 29 September. The term runs from September or October to Christmas.Contents1 The legal year 2 Universities 3 Schools 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksThe legal year[edit] The term is also the name of the first of four terms into which the legal year is divided by the Courts of England and Wales
Courts of England and Wales
and the Courts of Northern Ireland. While the name is not used in the legal systems of the United States, the U. S
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South Marston
South Marston[2] is a village and civil parish in the Borough of Swindon, Wiltshire, England. The village is about 3 miles (5 km) north-east of Swindon.Contents1 History 2 Industries 3 Notable resident 4 Demography 5 Sources 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] The earliest documentary evidence for continuous settlement in the parish is from the 13th century, but there is fragmentary evidence for occupation as far back as the Bronze Age. It is claimed that there were Roman remains just outside South Marston
South Marston
in a field belonging to Rowborough Farm, but these have long disappeared. Ermin Way, a major Roman road linking Silchester
Silchester
and Gloucester, ran close to the south-west side of the village, separating it from Stratton St Margaret
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South Parks Road
South Parks Road
Parks Road
is a road in Oxford, England.[1][2] It runs east-west past the main Science Area of the University of Oxford. Many of the university science departments are located nearby or face the road, including parts of the geography, zoology, chemistry, psychology and physiology departments. Also on the road is Rhodes House. To the west, the road adjoins Parks Road
Parks Road
at a T junction
T junction
with the Radcliffe Science Library
Radcliffe Science Library
just to the north. To the east, the road bends sharply south at Linacre College
Linacre College
and becomes St Cross Road. A cycle route continues east towards New Marston, crossing the River Cherwell. About halfway along South Parks Road, Mansfield Road adjoins to the south
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Worshipful Company Of Stationers And Newspaper Makers
The Worshipful Company of Stationers and Newspaper Makers
Worshipful Company of Stationers and Newspaper Makers
(until 1937 the Worshipful Company of Stationers), usually known as the Stationers' Company, is one of the livery companies of the City of London. The Stationers' Company was formed in 1403; it received a Royal Charter
Royal Charter
in 1557. It held a monopoly over the publishing industry and was officially responsible for setting and enforcing regulations until the enactment of the Statute of Anne
Statute of Anne
in 1710. Once the Company received its Charter, “the Company’s role was to regulate and discipline the industry, define proper conduct and maintain its own corporate privileges.”[1] Its members (Master, Wardens, Assistants, Liverymen, Freemen and Apprentices) are mostly involved with the modern visual and graphic communications industries which have evolved from the company's original trades
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Academic Library
An academic library is a library that is attached to a higher education institution which serves two complementary purposes to support the school's curriculum, and to support the research of the university faculty and students.[1] It is unknown how many academic libraries there are internationally. An academic and research portal maintained by UNESCO
UNESCO
links to 3,785 libraries. According to the National Center for Education Statistics, there are an estimated 3,700 academic libraries in the United States.[1] The support of teaching and learning requires material for class readings and for student papers. In the past, the material for class readings, intended to supplement lectures as prescribed by the instructor, has been called reserves
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Union Catalog
A union catalog is a combined library catalog describing the collections of a number of libraries. Union catalogs have been created in a range of media, including book format, microform, cards and more recently, networked electronic databases. Print union catalogs are typically arranged by title, author or subject (often employing a controlled vocabulary); electronic versions typically support keyword and Boolean queries. Union catalogs are useful to librarians, as they assist in locating and requesting materials from other libraries through interlibrary loan service. They also allow researchers to search through collections to which they would not otherwise have access, such as manuscript collections. The largest union catalog ever printed is the American National Union Catalog Pre-1956 Imprints (NUC), completed in 1981.[1] This achievement has since been superseded by the creation of union catalogs in the form of electronic databases, of which the largest is OCLC's WorldCat
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The Advancement Of Learning
The Advancement of Learning
The Advancement of Learning
(full title: Of the Proficience and Advancement of Learning, Divine and Human) is a 1605 book by Francis Bacon
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