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Bobby Sands
Robert Gerard Sands (Irish: Roibeárd Gearóid Ó Seachnasaigh;[2] 9 March 1954 – 5 May 1981) was a member of the Provisional Irish Republican
Irish Republican
Army who died on hunger strike while imprisoned at HM Prison Maze after being sentenced for firearms possession. He was the leader of the 1981 hunger strike in which Irish republican prisoners protested against the removal of Special
Special
Category Status. During Sands's strike, he was elected to the British Parliament as an Anti H-Block candidate.[3][4] His death and those of nine other hunger strikers was followed by a new surge of Provisional IRA
Provisional IRA
recruitment and activity
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Coach (bus)
A coach (also motor coach) is a type of bus used for conveying passengers. In contrast to transit buses that typically used within a single metropolitan region, coaches are used for longer-distance bus service. Often used for intercity—or even international—bus service, other coaches are also used for private charter for various purposes. Deriving the name from horse-drawn carriages and stagecoaches that carried passengers, luggage, and mail, modern motor coaches are almost always high-floor buses, with a separate luggage hold mounted below the passenger compartment. In contrast to transit buses, motor coaches typically feature forward-facing seating, with no provision for standing
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Roman Catholic
The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with more than 1.29 billion members worldwide.[4] As one of the oldest religious institutions in the world, it has played a prominent role in the history and development of Western civilisation.[5] Headed by the Bishop of Rome, known as the Pope, the church's doctrines are summarised in the Nicene Creed
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Royal Ulster Constabulary
The Royal Ulster Constabulary
Royal Ulster Constabulary
was the police force in Northern Ireland from 1922 to 2001. Following the awarding of the George Cross
George Cross
in 2000, its formal title became the Royal Ulster Constabulary, GC. It was founded on 1 June 1922 as a successor to the Royal Irish Constabulary (RIC).[1] At its peak the force had around 8,500 officers with a further 4,500 who were members of the RUC Reserve. During the Troubles, 319 members of the RUC were killed and almost 9,000 injured in paramilitary assassinations or attacks, mostly by the Provisional IRA, which made the RUC, by 1983, the most dangerous police force in the world in which to serve.[2][3][4] In the same period, the RUC killed 55 people, 28 of whom were civilians.[5] The RUC was superseded by the Police
Police
Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI) in 2001
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Dunmurry
Dunmurry
Dunmurry
(/dʌnˈmʌri/; from Irish Dún Muirígh, meaning 'Murry's stronghold')[1] is an urban townland, in Belfast. Dunmurry
Dunmurry
is also an electoral ward for Belfast
Belfast
City Council.Contents1 History 2 Politics 3 Features 4 Dunmurry
Dunmurry
tower block fire 5 Sport 6 Transport 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] Until the end of the 18th century, Dunmurry
Dunmurry
was largely an agricultural area dominated by wealthy landowners
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Slop Out
Slopping out is the manual emptying of human waste when prison cells are unlocked in the morning. Inmates without a flush toilet in the cell have to use other means (formerly a chamber pot, then a bucket, now often a chemical toilet) while locked in during the night. The reason that some cells do not have toilets is that they date from the Victorian era
Victorian era
and were therefore not designed with plumbing. As a result, there is no space in which to put a toilet, together with the expense and difficulty of installing the necessary pipes.Contents1 Phasing out 2 Other 3 See also 4 ReferencesPhasing out[edit] See also: List of prisons in the United Kingdom Slopping out was allegedly abolished in England and Wales
England and Wales
by 1996, although Private Eye
Private Eye
in 2011 reported that Prisons Inspector Nick Hardwick stated that it still persisted at HMP Gloucester
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Fenian
Fenian
Fenian
(/ˈfiːniən/) was an umbrella term for the Fenian
Fenian
Brotherhood and Irish Republican Brotherhood
Irish Republican Brotherhood
(IRB), fraternal organisations dedicated to the establishment of an independent Irish Republic
Irish Republic
in the 19th and early 20th centuries. The term Fenian
Fenian
is still used today, in Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
and less so in Scotland, where its original meaning has widened to include all supporters of anything Irish and it can include an insult to regard people from the south of Ireland and tri-colours supporters
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Tartan Gang
The Ulster Young Militants are considered to be the youth wing of the Ulster Defence Association (UDA), an Ulster loyalist paramilitary group in Northern Ireland. Commonly known as the Young Militants or UYM, the group formed in 1974 when the Troubles were at their height.[1] Their motto is "terrae filius", Latin for "son of the land". Their numbers are unknown, but are mainly concentrated in the Belfast area, particularly east and south Belfast.Contents1 Development 2 Activities 3 See also 4 ReferencesDevelopment[edit] The UYM had its origins in the "Tartan Gangs" of the early 1970s, unofficial loyalist street gangs who gained their name from the tartan scarves and flash of tartan they wore on their denim jackets.[2] The tartan was said to commemorate the 1971 Scottish soldiers' killings by the Provisional IRA.[2][3] Author Ian S
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Member Of Parliament (United Kingdom)
A member of parliament (MP) is the representative of the voters to a parliament. In many countries with bicameral parliaments, this category includes specifically members of the lower house, as upper houses often have a different title
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Defender (association Football)
In the sport of association football, a defender is an outfield player whose primary role is to prevent the opposing team from scoring goals. There are four types of defenders: centre-back, sweeper, full-back, and wing-back. The centre-back and full-back positions are essential in most modern formations
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Association Football
Association football, more commonly known as football or soccer,[a] is a team sport played between two teams of eleven players with a spherical ball. It is played by 250 million players in over 200 countries and dependencies, making it the world's most popular sport.[3][4][5][6] The game is played on a rectangular field with a goal at each end. The object of the game is to score by moving the ball beyond the goal line into the opposing goal. Players are not allowed to touch the ball with outstretched hands or arms while it is in play, unless they are goalkeepers within their penalty area. Other players mainly use their feet to strike or pass the ball, but may also use any other part of their body except the hands and the arms. The team that scores the most goals by the end of the match wins. If the score is level at the end of the game, either a draw is declared or the game goes into extra time or a penalty shootout depending on the format of the competition
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Rathcoole (Belfast)
Rathcoole (from Irish Ráth Cúile, meaning 'corner/nook of the ringfort'[citation needed]) is a housing estate in Newtownabbey, County Antrim, Northern Ireland. It was built in the 1950s to house many of those displaced by the demolition of inner city housing in Belfast
Belfast
city. Rathcoole is within the wider Newtownabbey
Newtownabbey
Borough. Its approximate borders are provided by the O'Neill Road on the north, Doagh
Doagh
Road on the east, Shore Road on the south and the Church Road and Merville Garden Village
Merville Garden Village
on the west.Contents1 Community history and setting 2 Civil unrest 3 Decline and regeneration 4 Education 5 Politics 6 Sport 7 Notable people from Rathcoole 8 ReferencesCommunity history and setting[edit]This section relies largely or entirely on a single source. Relevant discussion may be found on the talk page
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County Antrim
County Antrim
County Antrim
(named after the town of Antrim, from Irish: Aontroim, meaning "lone ridge", [ˈeːnˠt̪ˠɾˠɪmʲ])[5]) is one of six counties that form Northern Ireland. Adjoined to the north-east shore of Lough Neagh, the county covers an area of 3,046 square kilometres (1,176 sq mi)[6] and has a population of about 618,000. County Antrim
County Antrim
has a population density of 203 people per square kilometre or 526 people per square mile.[7] It is also one of the thirty-two traditional counties of Ireland, as well as part of the historic province of Ulster. The Glens of Antrim
Glens of Antrim
offer isolated rugged landscapes, the Giant's Causeway is a unique landscape and a UNESCO
UNESCO
World Heritage Site, Bushmills
Bushmills
produces whiskey, and Portrush
Portrush
is a popular seaside resort and night-life area
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Belfast
Belfast
Belfast
(/ˈbɛlfɑːst, -fæst/; from Irish: Béal Feirste), meaning "rivermouth of the sandbanks"[11] is the capital and largest city of Northern Ireland, and the second largest on the island of Ireland.[12] On the River Lagan, it had a population of 333,871 in 2015.[1] By the early 1800s the former town was home to a major port. Belfast played a key role in the Industrial Revolution
Industrial Revolution
in the 19th century, becoming the biggest linen producer in the world, earning it the nickname "Linenopolis". By the time it was granted city status in 1888, it was a major centre of the Irish linen as well as tobacco-processing, rope-making and shipbuilding industries. Harland and Wolff, which built the RMS Titanic, was the world's biggest and most productive shipyard.[13] It later also sustained a major aerospace and missiles industry
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Parliament Of The United Kingdom
HM Government     Conservative Party (245)Confidence and supply     Democratic Unionist
Democratic Unionist
Party (3)HM Most Loyal Opposition     Labour Party (191)Other opposition     Liberal Democrats (98)      Non-affiliated (29)      UKIP (3)      Ind. Labour (3)      Ulster Unionist Party
Ulster Unionist Party
(2)      Green Party (1)      Ind. Social Democrat (1)      Ind
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Gordon Lightfoot
Gordon Meredith Lightfoot Jr. CC OOnt (born November 17, 1938) is a Canadian singer-songwriter who achieved international success in folk, folk-rock, and country music. He is credited with helping to define the folk-pop sound of the 1960s and 1970s.[1] He is often referred to as Canada's greatest songwriter[2] and is known internationally as a folk-rock legend.[3][4] Lightfoot's songs, including "For Lovin' Me", "Early Morning Rain", "Steel Rail Blues", "Ribbon of Darkness"—a number one hit on the U.S. country chart[5] with Marty Robbins's cover in 1965—and "Black Day in July" about the 1967 Detroit riot, brought him wide recognition in the 1960s. Canadian chart success with his own recordings began in 1962 with the No. 3 hit "(Remember Me) I'm the One", followed by recognition and charting abroad in the 1970s
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