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Bob Peck
Robert Peck (23 August 1945 – 4 April 1999) was an English stage, television and film actor who was best known for his roles as Ronald Craven in the television serial Edge of Darkness
Edge of Darkness
and as gamekeeper Robert Muldoon in the film Jurassic Park.Contents1 Early life 2 Career2.1 Stage career 2.2 Edge of Darkness 2.3 Film success 2.4 Later years3 Awards 4 Personal life4.1 Death5 Filmography 6 References 7 External linksEarly life[edit] Robert Peck was born into a working-class family in Leeds, West Riding of Yorkshire, on 23 August 1945. He went to Leeds
Leeds
Modern School in Lawnswood
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Z-Cars
Z-Cars or Z Cars /ˈzɛd ˌkɑːrz/ was a British television
British television
drama series centred on the work of mobile uniformed police in the fictional town of Newtown, based on Kirkby, Lancashire
Lancashire
(now Merseyside). Produced by the BBC, it debuted in January 1962 and ran until September 1978. The series differed sharply from earlier police procedurals. With its less-usual Northern setting, it injected a new element of harsh realism into the image of the police, which some found unwelcome. Z-Cars ran for a total of 801 episodes, of which fewer than half have survived. Regular stars included: Stratford Johns (Detective Inspector Barlow), Frank Windsor (Det. Sgt Watt), James Ellis (Bert Lynch) and Brian Blessed
Brian Blessed
("Fancy" Smith)
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Crime Drama
Crime
Crime
cinema, in the broadest sense, is a cinematic genre inspired by and analogous to the crime fiction literary genre. Films of this genre generally involve various aspects of crime and its detection. Stylistically, the genre may overlap and combine with many other genres, such as drama or gangster film, but also include comedy, and, in turn, is divided into many sub-genres, such as mystery, suspense or noir.Contents1 Source of plots 2 Plays and films 3 Subgenres 4 See also 5 References 6 Further readingSource of plots[edit] Crime
Crime
films are often based on or are adaptations of plays or novels. For example, the 1957 film version of Witness for the Prosecution is an adaptation of a 1953 stage play of that name, which is in turn based on Agatha Christie's short story, originally published in 1933. The film version was remade in 1982, and there have been other adaptations
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Bruce Chatwin
Charles Bruce Chatwin
Bruce Chatwin
(13 May 1940 – 18 January 1989) was an English travel writer, novelist, and journalist. His first book, In Patagonia
Patagonia
(1977), established Chatwin as a travel writer, although he considered himself instead a storyteller, interested in bringing to light unusual tales. He won the James Tait Black Memorial Prize for his novel On the Black Hill
On the Black Hill
(1982), while his novel Utz (1988) was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize. In 2008 The Times
The Times
named Chatwin number 46 on their list of "50 Greatest British Writers Since 1945." Chatwin was born in Sheffield, England
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Macbeth
Macbeth
Macbeth
(/məkˈbɛθ/; full title The Tragedy of Macbeth) is a tragedy by William Shakespeare; it is thought to have been first performed in 1606.[a] It dramatises the damaging physical and psychological effects of political ambition on those who seek power for its own sake. Of all the plays that Shakespeare
Shakespeare
wrote during the reign of James I, who was patron of Shakespeare's acting company, Macbeth
Macbeth
most clearly reflects the playwright's relationship with his sovereign.[1] It was first published in the Folio of 1623, possibly from a prompt book, and is Shakespeare's shortest tragedy.[2] A brave Scottish general named Macbeth
Macbeth
receives a prophecy from a trio of witches that one day he will become King of Scotland
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Leeds
Leeds
Leeds
/liːdz/ ( listen)[5] is a city in West Yorkshire, England. Historically in Yorkshire's West Riding, Leeds
Leeds
can be traced to the 5th century name for a wooded area of the Kingdom of Elmet. The name has been applied to many administrative entities over the centuries. It changed from being the name of a small manorial borough in the 13th century, through several incarnations, to being the name attached to the present metropolitan borough
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Play For Today
Play for Today
Play for Today
is a British television
British television
anthology drama series, produced by the BBC
BBC
and transmitted on BBC1 from 1970 to 1984. During the run, more than three hundred programmes, featuring original television plays, and adaptations of stage plays and novels, were transmitted. The individual episodes were between fifty and a hundred minutes in duration. A handful of these plays, including Rumpole of the Bailey and The Blackstuff (later Boys from the Blackstuff), subsequently became television series in their own right.Contents1 History 2 Controversies 3 Demise and legacy 4 Plays for Today on DVD 5 See also 6 References 7 Bibliography 8 External linksHistory[edit] The strand was a successor to The Wednesday Play, the 1960s anthology series, the title being changed when the day of transmission became variable
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Television Writer
Screenwriting, also called scriptwriting, is the art and craft of writing scripts for mass media such as feature films, television productions or video games. It is frequently a freelance profession. Screenwriters are responsible for researching the story, developing the narrative, writing the screenplay and delivering it, in the required format, to development executives. Screenwriters therefore have great influence over the creative direction and emotional impact of the screenplay and, arguably, of the finished film
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The Italian Job (1969 Film)
The Italian Job
The Italian Job
is a 1969 British comedy caper film, written by Troy Kennedy Martin, produced by Michael Deeley and directed by Peter Collinson. Subsequent television showings and releases on video have made it well known in the United Kingdom. Its soundtrack was composed by Quincy Jones, and includes "On Days Like These" sung by Matt Monro
Matt Monro
over the opening credits, and "Getta Bloomin' Move On" (usually referred to as "The Self-Preservation Society", after its chorus) during the climactic car chase. Lead actor Michael Caine
Michael Caine
is among its singers.[1] In 1999, it was ranked #36 on the BFI Top 100 British films by the British Film Institute
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Police Procedural
The police procedural, or police crime drama, is a subgenre of detective fiction that attempts to convincingly depict procedurals frequently depict investigations into several unrelated crimes in a single story. Traditional mysteries usually adhere to the convention of having the criminal's identity concealed until the climax (the so-called whodunit), whereas in police procedurals, the perpetrator's identity is often known to the audience from the outset (the inverted detective story or howcatchem). Police
Police
procedurals depict a number of police-related topics such as forensics, autopsies, the gathering of evidence, the use of search warrants, and interrogation.Contents1 Early history 2 Written stories2.1 Ed McBain 2.2 John Creasey/J. J
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Political Thriller
A political thriller is a thriller that is set against the backdrop of a political power struggle. They usually involve various extra-legal plots, designed to give political power to someone, while his opponents try to stop him. They can involve national or international political scenarios. Political corruption, terrorism, and warfare are common themes. Political thrillers can be based on true facts such as the assassination of John F. Kennedy or the Watergate Scandal. There is a strong overlap with the conspiracy thriller. When reviewing the film The Interpreter, Erik Lundegaard attempted a definition:The basic plot is an ordinary man pulling an innocent thread which leads to a mess of corruption
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Macduff (Macbeth)
Lord Macduff, the Thane of Fife, is a character in William Shakespeare's Macbeth
Macbeth
(c.1603–1607). Macduff plays a pivotal role in the play: he suspects Macbeth
Macbeth
of regicide and eventually kills Macbeth in the final act
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Joanne Whalley
Joanne Whalley (born 25 August 1961)[1] is an English actress who began her career in 1974. She has since amassed numerous credits, primarily on television, but also in nearly 30 feature films, including Dance with a Stranger
Dance with a Stranger
(1985), Willow (1988), Scandal (1989), The Secret Rapture (1993) and Mother's Boys
Mother's Boys
(1994). Following her marriage to Val Kilmer
Val Kilmer
in 1988, she was credited as Joanne Whalley-Kilmer until their divorce in 1996. Whalley was nominated for the BAFTA TV Award for Best Actress for the 1985 BBC
BBC
serial Edge of Darkness, and was nominated for a Best Actress Golden Nymph Award
Golden Nymph Award
at the Monte-Carlo Television Festival
Monte-Carlo Television Festival
for the 2011 series The Borgias
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Charles Kay
Charles Kay (born Charles Piff, 31 August 1930) is an English actor. [1]Contents1 Early life 2 Royal Shakespeare Company 3 Film and television 4 References 5 External linksEarly life[edit] Kay was born in Coventry, Warwickshire, the son of Frances (née Petty) and Charles Beckingham Piff.[2] Originally educated at Warwick School, Kay went on to study medicine, then decided to train for the stage. He went to the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art (RADA) and in 1957, after graduation, joined the Radio Drama Company by winning the Carlton Hobbs Bursary.[3] He went on to join the English Stage Company
English Stage Company
at the Royal Court Theatre. He created the roles of Jimmy in Arnold Wesker's Roots (1959) and Charles V in John Osborne's Luther (1961)
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Ian McNeice
Ian McNeice (born 2 October 1950) is an English actor and voice actor. He found fame portraying government agent Harcourt in the 1985 television series Edge of Darkness, and went on to feature in popular films such as The Englishman Who Went Up a Hill But Came Down a Mountain, Ace Ventura: When Nature Calls and Frank Herbert's Dune. He played the Newsreader in historical drama Rome (2005–2007) and currently plays Bert Large in the comedy drama series Doc Martin (2004–present).Contents1 Early life and education 2 Career 3 Filmography3.1 Film and television4 References 5 External linksEarly life and education[edit] McNeice was born in Basingstoke, Hampshire. His acting training started at the Taunton School
Taunton School
in Somerset, followed by the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art (LAMDA) and two years at the Salisbury Playhouse
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BBC Two
BBC
BBC
Two is the second flagship television channel of the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) in the United Kingdom, Isle of Man
Isle of Man
and Channel Islands. It covers a wide range of subject matter, but tending towards more "highbrow" programmes than the more mainstream and popular BBC
BBC
One. Like the BBC's other domestic TV and radio channels, it is funded by the television licence, and is therefore free of commercial advertising. It is a comparatively well-funded public-service network, regularly attaining a much higher audience share than most public-service networks worldwide. Originally styled BBC2, it was the third British television station to be launched (starting on 21 April 1964), and from 1 July 1967, Europe's first television channel to broadcast regularly in colour
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