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Bob McCay
Robert Winsor McCay
Winsor McCay
(21 June 1896 – 21 April 1962) was an American cartoonist during the golden age of comic books. He worked professionally under the names R. Winsor McCay, Winsor McCay
Winsor McCay
Jr., and Bob McCay. He was the son of cartoonist and animator Winsor McCay.Contents1 Early life 2 Golden Age of Comic Books2.1 Illustrator 2.2 Inker/colorist3 McCay-Richardson Syndicate 4 References 5 External linksEarly life[edit]McCay's son Robert, posing as Little Nemo
Little Nemo
in 1908Robert McCay was born to Winsor and Maude McCay on 21 June 1896. A sister, Marion, was born the following year. In 1903 Winsor moved the family from Cincinnati
Cincinnati
to New York City
New York City
in order to work for the New York Herald
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Sketch (drawing)
A sketch (ultimately from Greek σχέδιος – schedios, "done extempore"[1][2][3]) is a rapidly executed freehand drawing that is not usually intended as a finished work.[4] A sketch may serve a number of purposes: it might record something that the artist sees, it might record or develop an idea for later use or it might be used as a quick way of graphically demonstrating an image, idea or principle. Sketches can be made in any drawing medium. The term is most often applied to graphic work executed in a dry medium such as silverpoint, graphite, pencil, charcoal or pastel. But it may also apply to drawings executed in pen and ink, ballpoint pen, water colour and oil paint. The latter two are generally referred to as "water colour sketches" and "oil sketches"
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California
Native languages as of 2007English 57.4%[2] Spanish 28.5%[3] Chinese 2.8%[3] Filipino 2.2%[3]Demonym CalifornianCapital SacramentoLargest city Los AngelesLargest metro Greater Los Angeles
Los Angeles
AreaArea Ranked 3rd • Total 163,696 sq mi (423,970 km2) • Width 250 miles (400 km) • Length 770 miles (1,240 km) • % water 4.7 • Latitude 32°32′ N to 42° N • Longitude 114°8′ W to 124°26′ W
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Colorist
In comics, a colorist is responsible for adding color to black-and-white line art. For most of the 20th century this was done using brushes and dyes which were then used as guides to produce the printing plates. Since the late 20th century it is most often done using digital media, with printing separations produced electronically. Although most American colorists work directly for comics publishers (either as employees or freelancers), there are a few coloring studios which offer their services to publishers. American Color, Olyoptics, and Digital Chameleon were companies notable in this field.Contents1 History 2 Digital color 3 Notable colorists 4 See also 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] Originally, comics were colored by cutting out films of various densities in the appropriate shapes to be used in producing color-separated printing plates. The typical colorist worked from photocopies of the inked pages, which they colored with special dyes. Dr
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Inker
The inker (sometimes credited as the finisher or embellisher or tracer)[1] is one of the two line artists in traditional comic book production. The penciller creates the initial drawing or sketch. Using a pen or a brush, the inker adds depth and shading to give the image more definition. Only then does the image take shape.[2] Inking was necessary in the traditional printing process as presses could not reproduce pencilled drawings. "Inking" of text is usually handled by another specialist, the letterer, the application of colors by the colorist.[3] As the last hand in the production chain before the colorist, the inker has the final word on the look of the page, and can help control a story's mood, pace, and readability
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Jack Binder (comics)
John "Jack" Binder (August 11, 1902 – March 6, 1986)[1] was a Golden Age comics creator and art packager. A fine artist by education, Binder had a prolific comics career that lasted primarily from 1937 to 1953, through his most concentrated work was through 1946. He was the creator of the original comic book Daredevil, for Lev Gleason Publications. Binder is credited with coining the term zero gravity as part of a 1938 article in Thrilling Wonder Stories
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Fawcett Comics
Fawcett Comics, a division of Fawcett Publications, was one of several successful comic book publishers during the Golden Age of Comic Books in the 1940s. Its most popular character was Captain Marvel, the alter ego of radio reporter Billy Batson, who transformed into the hero whenever he said the magic word "Shazam!". Other characters published by Fawcett include Captain Video, Hopalong Cassidy, Ibis the Invincible, Bulletman and Bulletgirl, Spy Smasher, Captain Midnight, Phantom Eagle, Mister Scarlet and Pinky, Minute-Man, Commando Yank and Golden Arrow. Aside from the better known superhero books, Fawcett also published a short-lived line of horror comics during the early 1950s, a string of titles which included This Magazine
Magazine
Is Haunted, Beware! Terror Tales, Worlds of Fear, Strange Suspense Stories, and Unknown World
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Bulletman
Bulletman is a fictional character originally published by Fawcett Comics.Contents1 Publication history 2 Fictional character biography2.1 Windshear 2.2 Bulleteer 2.3 Infinite Crisis3 Powers and abilities 4 Rogues gallery 5 Other versions 6 In other media6.1 Television7 References 8 External linksPublication history[edit] Created by Bill Parker and Jon Smalle, Bulletman first appeared in Nickel Comics #1 (May 1940). Fictional character biography[edit] Jim Barr was the son of a police officer who was killed in the line of duty and as a result took it upon himself to fight crime. He was rejected from the police academy for physical reasons, but got a job in ballistics
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Street & Smith
Street & Smith or Street & Smith Publications, Inc. was a New York City publisher specializing in inexpensive paperbacks and magazines referred to as dime novels and pulp fiction. They also published comic books and sporting yearbooks. Among their many titles was the science fiction pulp magazine Astounding Stories, acquired from Clayton Magazines in 1933, and retained until 1961. Street & Smith was founded in 1855, and was bought out in 1959. The Street & Smith headquarters was at 79 Seventh Avenue in Manhattan; it was designed by Henry F
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Blackstone The Magician
Harry Bouton Blackstone (born Henry Boughton; September 27, 1885 – November 16, 1965) was a famed stage magician and illusionist of the 20th century. Blackstone was born Harry Bouton[1] in Chicago, Illinois,[2] he began his career as a magician in his teens and was popular through World War II as a USO entertainer.[3] He was often billed as The Great Blackstone. His son Harry Blackstone Jr. also became a famous magician. Blackstone Sr. was aided by his younger brother (2 years younger) Pete Bouton who was the stage manager in all his shows.[4] Blackstone Sr. was married three times. Blackstone Jr
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Fort Ord, California
Fort Ord is a former United States Army post on Monterey Bay of the Pacific Ocean coast in California, which closed in 1994 due to Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) action. Most of the fort's land now makes up the Fort Ord National Monument, managed by the United States Bureau of Land Management as part of the National Conservation Lands, while a small portion remains an active military installation under Army control designated as the Ord Military Community. Before construction and official designation as a fort in 1940, the land was used as a maneuver area and field-artillery target range during 1917. Fort Ord was considered one of the most attractive locations of any U.S. Army post, because of its proximity to the beach and California weather. The 7th Infantry Division was its main garrison for many years
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Cartoonist
A cartoonist (also comic strip creator) is a visual artist who specializes in drawing cartoons. This work is often created for entertainment, political commentary, or advertising. Cartoonists may work in many formats, such as animation, booklets, comic strips, comic books, editorial cartoons, graphic novels, manuals, gag cartoons, graphic design, illustrations, storyboards, posters, shirts, books, advertisements, greeting cards, magazines, newspapers, and video game packaging.Contents1 History1.1 In the West2 Comics 3 Types of animation 4 Creation 5 Art styles5.1 Tools6 See also 7 References7.1 Works cited8 Further reading 9 External links9.1 Societies and organizations 9.2 CommunitiesHistory[edit] In the West[edit] The English satirist and editorial cartoonist William Hogarth, who emerged In the 18th century, has been credited with pioneering Western sequential art
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Time (magazine)
Time
Time
(styled TIME) is an American weekly news magazine and news website published in New York City. It was founded in 1923 and originally run by Henry Luce. A European edition ( Time
Time
Europe, formerly known as Time
Time
Atlantic) is published in London and also covers the Middle East, Africa and, since 2003, Latin America. An Asian edition ( Time
Time
Asia) is based in Hong Kong. The South Pacific edition, which covers Australia, New Zealand and the Pacific Islands, is based in Sydney
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Lambiek Comiclopedia
Galerie Lambiek is a Dutch comic book store and art gallery in Amsterdam, founded on November 8, 1968[1] by Kees Kousemaker (nl). From 1968 to 2015 it was located in the Kerkstraat, but in November 2015 the store moved to the Koningsstraat 27.[2] The Lambiek website is one of the longest-running resources about comics and cartoonists on the Internet. The website features a web shop for comic books, eComics, and original art,[3] as well as a news page with articles of interest to comics fans[4] and online art exhibitions
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