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Bob Dylan
Bob Dylan
Bob Dylan
(/ˈdɪlən/; born Robert Allen Zimmerman, May 24, 1941) is an American singer-songwriter, author, and painter, who has been an influential figure in popular music and culture for more than five decades. Much of his most celebrated work dates from the 1960s, when he became a reluctant "voice of a generation"[2] with songs such as "Blowin' in the Wind" and "The Times They Are a-Changin'" that became anthems for the Civil Rights Movement
Civil Rights Movement
and anti-war movement. In 1965, he controversially abandoned his early fan-base in the American folk music revival, recording a six-minute single, "Like a Rolling Stone", which enlarged the scope of popular music. Dylan's lyrics incorporate a wide range of political, social, philosophical, and literary influences. They defied existing pop-music conventions and appealed to the burgeoning counterculture
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Gospel Music
Gospel
Gospel
music is a genre of Christian music. The creation, performance, significance, and even the definition of gospel music varies according to culture and social context. Gospel
Gospel
music is composed and performed for many purposes, including aesthetic pleasure, religious or ceremonial purposes, and as an entertainment product for the marketplace. Gospel
Gospel
music usually has dominant vocals (often with strong use of harmony) with Christian lyrics. Gospel
Gospel
music can be traced to the early 17th century,[1] with roots in the black oral tradition. Hymns
Hymns
and sacred songs were often repeated in a call and response fashion. Most of the churches relied on hand clapping and foot stomping as rhythmic accompaniment. Most of the singing was done a cappella.[2] The first published use of the term "gospel song" probably appeared in 1874
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Duluth, Minnesota
Duluth /dəˈluːθ/ ( listen) is a major port city in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Minnesota
Minnesota
and the county seat of Saint Louis County. Duluth has a population of 86,293[5] and is the second-largest city on Lake Superior's shores; after Thunder Bay, Ontario, in Canada, it has the largest metropolitan area on the lake. The Duluth MSA had a population of 279,771 in 2010, the second-largest in Minnesota. Situated on the north shore of Lake Superior
Lake Superior
at the westernmost point of the Great Lakes, Duluth is accessible to oceangoing vessels from the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
2,300 miles (3,700 km) away via the Great Lakes Waterway and the Saint Lawrence Seaway.[6] Duluth forms a metropolitan area with neighboring Superior, Wisconsin, called the Twin Ports
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Malibu, California
Malibu (/ˈmælɪbuː/) is a beach city in western Los Angeles
Los Angeles
County, California, situated about 30 miles (48 km) west of Downtown Los Angeles. Known for its Mediterranean climate, a 21-mile (34 km) strip of the Malibu coast incorporated in 1991 into the City of Malibu. The area is known for being the home of Hollywood movie stars, people in the entertainment industry, and other affluent residents. Most Malibu residents live within a few hundred yards of Pacific Coast Highway (State Route 1), which traverses the city, with some residents living up to a mile away from the beach up narrow canyons. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 12,645. Signs around the city proclaim "21 miles of scenic beauty", referring to the incorporated city limits
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Civil Rights Movement
The civil rights movement (also known as the African-American civil rights movement, American civil rights movement and other terms)[b] was a decades long movement with the goal of securing legal rights for African Americans
African Americans
that other Americans
Americans
already held. With roots starting in the Reconstruction era
Reconstruction era
during the late 19th century, the movement resulted in the largest legislative impacts after the direct actions and grassroots protests organized from the mid-1950s until 1968
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Music Genre
A music genre is a conventional category that identifies some pieces of music as belonging to a shared tradition or set of conventions.[1] It is to be distinguished from musical form and musical style, although in practice these terms are sometimes used interchangeably.[2][not in citation given] Recently, academics have argued that categorizing music by genre is inaccurate and outdated.[3] Music
Music
can be divided into different genres in many different ways. The artistic nature of music means that these classifications are often subjective and controversial, and some genres may overlap. There are even varying academic definitions of the term genre itself. In his book Form in Tonal Music, Douglass M. Green distinguishes between genre and form. He lists madrigal, motet, canzona, ricercar, and dance as examples of genres from the Renaissance period. To further clarify the meaning of genre, Green writes, "Beethoven's Op. 61 and Mendelssohn's Op
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Jazz
Jazz
Jazz
is a music genre that originated in the African-American communities of New Orleans, United States,[1] in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and developed from roots in blues and ragtime.[2] Jazz
Jazz
is seen by many as 'America's classical music'.[3] Since the 1920s Jazz
Jazz
Age, jazz has become recognized as a major form of musical expression. It then emerged in the form of independent traditional and popular musical styles, all linked by the common bonds of African-American
African-American
and European-American
European-American
musical parentage with a performance orientation.[4] Jazz
Jazz
is characterized by swing and blue notes, call and response vocals, polyrhythms and improvisation
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Vitoria-Gasteiz
Vitoria-Gasteiz
Vitoria-Gasteiz
(/vɪˌtɔːriə ɡɑːsˈteɪs/, Spanish: [biˈtoɾja ɣasˈteiθ], Basque: [ɡas̺teis̻]) is the seat of government and the capital city of the Basque Autonomous Community and of the province of Araba/ Álava
Álava
in northern Spain. It holds the autonomous community's House of Parliament, the headquarters of the Government, and the Lehendakari's (Prime Minister's) official residency. The municipality — which comprises not only the city but also the mainly agricultural lands of 63 villages around — is the largest in the Basque Autonomous Community, with a total area of 276.81 km2 (106.88 sq mi), and it has a population of 242,082 people (2014). The dwellers of Vitoria-Gasteiz are called vitorianos or gasteiztarrak, while traditionally they are dubbed babazorros (Basque for 'bean sacks')
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Rock And Roll
Rock and roll
Rock and roll
(often written as rock & roll or rock 'n' roll) is a genre of popular music that originated and evolved in the United States during the late 1940s and early 1950s,[1][2] from African American musical styles such as gospel, jump blues, jazz, boogie woogie, and rhythm and blues,[3] along with country music.[4] While elements of rock and roll can be heard in blues records from the 1920s[5] and in country records of the 1930s,[4] the genre did not acquire its name until 1954.[6][7] According to Greg Kot, "rock and roll" refers to a style of popular music originating in the U.S
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Traditional Pop Music
Traditional pop (also classic pop or pop standards) music consists of Western popular music that generally pre-dates the advent of rock and roll in the mid-1950s. The most popular and enduring songs from this style of music are known as pop standards or American standards. The works of these songwriters and composers are usually considered part of the canon known as the "Great American Songbook". More generally, the term "standard" can be applied to any popular song that has become very widely known within mainstream culture. Traditional/classic pop music is generally regarded as having existed between the mid-1940s and mid-1950s
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Country Music
Country music
Country music
(/ˈkʌntri/), also known as country and western or simply country, is a genre of popular music that originated in the southern United States in the early 1920s.[1] It takes its roots from genres such as folk music (especially Appalachian folk music) and blues. Country music
Country music
often consists of ballads and dance tunes with generally simple forms, folk lyric and harmonies accompanied by mostly string instruments such as banjos, electric and acoustic guitars, steel guitars (such as pedal steels and dobros), and fiddles as well as harmonicas.[2][3][4] Blues
Blues
modes have been used extensively throughout its recorded history.[5] According to Lindsey Starnes, the term country music gained popularity in the 1940s in preference to the earlier term hillbilly music; it came to encompass Western music, which evolved parallel to hillbilly music from similar roots, in the mid-20th century
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Folk Music Of Ireland
Irish traditional music
Irish traditional music
(also known as Irish trad, Irish folk music, and other variants) is a genre of folk music that developed in Ireland. In A History of Irish Music (1905), W. H. Grattan Flood
W. H

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Scottish Folk Music
Scottish folk music
Scottish folk music
(also Scottish traditional music) is music that uses forms that are identified as part of the Scottish musical tradition. There is evidence that there was a flourishing culture of popular music in Scotland during the late Middle Ages, but the only song with a melody to survive from this period is the "Pleugh Song". After the Reformation, the secular popular tradition of music continued, despite attempts by the Kirk, particularly in the Lowlands, to suppress dancing and events like penny weddings. The first clear reference to the use of the Highland bagpipes
Highland bagpipes
mentions their use at the Battle of Pinkie Cleugh
Battle of Pinkie Cleugh
in 1547
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Folk Music Of England
The folk music of England is tradition-based music, which has existed since the later medieval period. It is often contrasted with courtly, classical and later commercial music. Folk music
Folk music
has been preserved and transmitted orally, through print and later through recordings. The term is used to refer to English traditional music and music composed, or delivered, in a traditional style. English folk music has produced or contributed to several important musical genres, including sea shanties, jigs, hornpipes and dance music, such as that used for Morris dancing. It can be seen as having distinct regional and local variations in content and style, particularly in areas more removed from the cultural and political centres of the English state, as in Northumbria, or the West Country
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Rockabilly
Rockabilly
Rockabilly
is one of the earliest styles of rock and roll music, dating back to the early 1950s in the United States, especially the South. As a genre it blends the sound of Western musical styles such as country with that of rhythm and blues,[1][2] leading to what is considered "classic" rock and roll.[3] Some have also described it as a blend of bluegrass with rock and roll.[4] The term "rockabilly" itself is a portmanteau of "rock" (from "rock 'n' roll") and "hillbilly", the latter a reference to the country music (often called "hillbilly music" in the 1940s and 1950s) that contributed strongly to the style
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Asylum Records
Asylum Records is an American record label, founded in 1971 by David Geffen and partner Elliot Roberts. It was taken over by Warner Communications (now the Warner Music Group) in 1972, and later merged with Elektra Records
Elektra Records
to become Elektra/Asylum Records. After various incarnations, it is currently geared primarily towards hip-hop, along with rock and alternative metal. It is owned by Warner Music Group, and is currently distributed through Alternative Distribution Alliance.Contents1 Company history1.1 Formation 1.2 Merger with Elektra Records 1.3 Country format 1.4 Relaunch2 See also 3 ReferencesCompany history[edit] Formation[edit]Original logoAsylum logo in the UK and on period reissues from RhinoAsylum was founded in 1971 by David Geffen, and partner Elliot Roberts, both of whom had previously worked as agents at the William Morris Agency, and operated a folk/rock label
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