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Blueberry
See textBlueberries are perennial flowering plants with indigo-colored berries. They are classified in the section Cyanococcus within the genus Vaccinium. Vaccinium
Vaccinium
also includes cranberries, bilberries and grouseberries.[1] Commercial "blueberries" are native to North America, and the "highbush" varieties were not introduced into Europe until the 1930s.[2] Blueberries are usually prostrate shrubs that can vary in size from 10 centimeters (3.9 in) to 4 meters (13 ft) in height. In the commercial production of blueberries, the smaller species are known as "lowbush blueberries" (synonymous with "wild"), while the larger species are known as "highbush blueberries". The leaves can be either deciduous or evergreen, ovate to lanceolate, and 1–8 cm (0.39–3.15 in) long and 0.5–3.5 cm (0.20–1.38 in) broad. The flowers are bell-shaped, white, pale pink or red, sometimes tinged greenish
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Vaccinium Koreanum
Vaccinium
Vaccinium
koreanum Nakai,[1] common name "Korean blueberry" in English or "hong guo yue ju" in Chinese, is a plant species native to Korea and also to neighboring Liaoning
Liaoning
Province in China. It is a deciduous shrub with toothed leaves and red, ellipsoid berries.[2][3] References[edit]^ Takenoshin Nakai , Trees Shrubs Japan. 1: 191. 1922. ^ Flora of China
China
Nakai, 1922. 红果越桔 hong guo yue ju ^ TropicosExternal links[edit]line drawing, Flora of China
China
Illustrations vol. 14, fig. 686, 6-7Taxon identifiersWd: Q12600028 EoL: 2880452 FoC: 242444177 GBIF: 4171822 GRIN: 41026 IPNI: 60432421-2 Plant List: tro-50282911 Tropicos: 50282911This Ericaceae
Ericaceae
article is a stub
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Common Name
In biology, a common name of a taxon or organism (also known as a vernacular name, English name, colloquial name, trivial name, trivial epithet, country name, popular name, or farmer's name) is a name that is based on the normal language of everyday life; this kind of name is often contrasted with the scientific name for the same organism, which is Latinized. A common name is sometimes frequently used, but that is by no means always the case.[1] Sometimes common names are created by authorities on one particular subject, in an attempt to make it possible for members of the general public (including such interested parties as fishermen, farmers, etc.) to be able to refer to one particular species of organism without needing to be able to memorise or pronounce the Latinized scientific name
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Evergreen
In botany, an evergreen is a plant that has leaves throughout the year, always green. This is true even if the plant retains its foliage only in warm climates, and contrasts with deciduous plants, which completely lose their foliage during the winter or dry season
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Ovate
A hand axe (or handaxe) is a prehistoric stone tool with two faces that is the longest-used tool in human history. It is usually made from flint or chert. It is characteristic of the lower Acheulean
Acheulean
and middle Palaeolithic
Palaeolithic
(Mousterian) periods. Its technical name (biface) comes from the fact that the archetypical model is generally bifacial Lithic flake
Lithic flake
and almond-shaped (amygdaloidal). Hand axes tend to be symmetrical along their longitudinal axis and formed by pressure or percussion. The most common hand axes have a pointed end and rounded base, which gives them their characteristic shape, and both faces have been knapped to remove the natural cortex, at least partially
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Flower
A flower, sometimes known as a bloom or blossom, is the reproductive structure found in flowering plants (plants of the division Magnoliophyta, also called angiosperms). The biological function of a flower is to effect reproduction, usually by providing a mechanism for the union of sperm with eggs. Flowers may facilitate outcrossing (fusion of sperm and eggs from different individuals in a population) or allow selfing (fusion of sperm and egg from the same flower). Some flowers produce diaspores without fertilization (parthenocarpy). Flowers contain sporangia and are the site where gametophytes develop. Many flowers have evolved to be attractive to animals, so as to cause them to be vectors for the transfer of pollen
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Epicuticular Wax
Epicuticular wax
Epicuticular wax
is a coating of wax covering the outer surface of the plant cuticle in land plants. It may form a whitish film or bloom on leaves, fruits and other plant organs. Chemically, it consists of hydrophobic organic compounds, mainly straight-chain aliphatic hydrocarbons with a variety of substituted functional groups. The main functions of the epicuticular wax are to decrease surface wetting and moisture loss. Other functions include reflection of ultraviolet light, assisting in the formation of an ultrahydrophobic and self-cleaning surface and acting as an anti-climb surface.Contents1 Chemical composition 2 Physical properties 3 Epicuticular wax
Epicuticular wax
crystals 4 References 5 Further readingChemical composition[edit] Common constituents of epicuticular wax are predominantly straight-chain aliphatic hydrocarbons that may be saturated or unsaturated and contain a variety of functional groups
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Circumpolar Distribution
A circumpolar distribution is any range of a taxon that occurs over a wide range of longitudes but only at high latitudes; such a range therefore extends all the way around either the North Pole
North Pole
or the South Pole.[1][2] Taxa that are also found in isolated high-mountain environments further from the poles are said to have arctic–alpine distributions.[3] Animals with circumpolar distributions include the reindeer,[1][2] polar bear,[4] Arctic fox,[1][5] snowy owl,[5] snow bunting,[5] king eider,[5] brent goose[5] and long-tailed skua[5] in the north, and the Weddell seal[1] and Adélie penguin[1] in the south. Plants with northern circumpolar distributions include Eutrema edwardsii (syn. Draba laevigata),[2] Saxifraga oppositifolia,[3] Persicaria vivipara[6] and Honckenya peploides.[7][8][9] References[edit]^ a b c d e Vladimir Kotlyakov & Anna Komarova (2006). Elsevier's Dictionary of Geography: in English, Russian, French, Spanish and German
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Europe
Europe
Europe
is a continent located entirely in the Northern Hemisphere
Northern Hemisphere
and mostly in the Eastern Hemisphere. It is bordered by the Arctic
Arctic
Ocean to the north, the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
to the west, and the Mediterranean Sea to the south. It comprises the westernmost part of Eurasia. Since around 1850, Europe
Europe
is most commonly considered as separated from Asia
Asia
by the watershed divides of the Ural and Caucasus
Caucasus
Mountains, the Ural River, the Caspian and Black Seas, and the waterways of the Turkish Straits.[5] Though the term "continent" implies physical geography, the land border is somewhat arbitrary and has moved since its first conception in classical antiquity
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Asia
Metropolitan areas of Asia List of cities in AsiaList Bangkok Beijing Busan Chittagong Delhi Dhaka Doha Dubai Guangzhou Hanoi Ho Chi Minh Hong Kong Istanbul Jakarta Karachi Kuala Lumpur Manila Mumbai Osaka Pyongyang Riyadh Shanghai Shenzhen Singapore Seoul Taipei[4] Tehran Tokyo Ulaanbaatar Asia
Asia
(/ˈeɪʒə, ˈeɪʃə/ ( listen)) is Earth's largest and most populous continent, located primarily in the Eastern and Northern Hemispheres. It shares the continental landmass of Eurasia with the continent of Europe
Europe
and the continental landmass of Afro- Eurasia
Eurasia
with both Europe
Europe
and Africa
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Vaccinium Myrtillus
Vaccinium myrtillus is a species of shrub with edible fruit of blue color, commonly called "bilberry", "wimberry", "whortleberry", or European blueberry.[3] It has much in common with the American blueberry (Vaccinium cyanococcus). It is more precisely called common bilberry or blue whortleberry, to distinguish it from other Vaccinium relatives. Regional names include blaeberry, urts (Cornwall),[4] hurtleberry,[5] huckleberry, wimberry, whinberry, winberry,[6] blueberry,[7] and fraughan.[8]Contents1 Range 2 Uses2.1 Fruit 2.2 Leaf3 Confusion between bilberries and American blueberries 4 See also 5 References 6 External links 7 External linksRange[edit]The flowers are borne singly in leaf axils on 2–3 mm long pedicels. The corolla is pink and shaped like an urn
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Leaf
A leaf is an organ of a vascular plant and is the principal lateral appendage of the stem.[1] The leaves and stem together form the shoot.[2] Leaves are collectively referred to as foliage, as in "autumn foliage".[3][4]Diagram of a simple leaf.Apex Midvein (Primary vein) Secondary vein. Lamina. Leaf
Leaf
margin Petiole Bud StemAlthough leaves can be seen in many different shapes, sizes and textures, typically a leaf is a thin, dorsiventrally flattened organ, borne above ground and specialized for photosynthesis. In most leaves, the primary photosynthetic tissue, the palisade mesophyll, is located on the upper side of the blade or lamina of the leaf[1] but in some species, including the mature foliage of Eucalyptus,[5] palisade mesophyll is present on both sides and the leaves are said to be isobilateral
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Pilot Mountain (North Carolina)
Pilot Mountain, a metamorphic quartzite monadnock rising to a peak 2,421 feet (738 m) above sea level, is one of the most distinctive natural features in the U.S. state of North Carolina. It is a remnant of the ancient chain of Sauratown Mountains. The Saura Indians, the region's earliest known inhabitants, called the mountain "Jomeokee", meaning "great guide".[1] U.S. Route 52 passes through the town of Pilot Mountain near the mountain, and the city of Mount Airy is some miles farther north. Pilot Mountain is part of the A.V.A Yadkin Valley, an American Viticultural Area comprising over 50 wineries, including a few wineries in the town of Pilot Mountain. Pilot Mountain has two distinctive features, named Big and Little Pinnacle
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Centimeters
A centimetre (international spelling as used by the International Bureau of Weights and Measures; symbol cm) or centimeter (American spelling) is a unit of length in the metric system, equal to one hundredth of a metre, centi being the SI prefix
SI prefix
for a factor of 1/100.[1] The centimetre was the base unit of length in the now deprecated centimetre–gram–second (CGS) system of units. Though for many physical quantities, SI prefixes for factors of 103—like milli- and kilo-—are often preferred by technicians, the centimetre remains a practical unit of length for many everyday measurements
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Vaccinium Boreale
Vaccinium boreale, common name northern blueberry, sweet hurts or (in French) bleuet boréal, is a plant species native to the northeastern United States and eastern Canada.[1] It has been reported from Québec, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Newfoundland & Labrador, Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, and New York State. It grows in tundra (arctic or alpine), rocky uplands and in open conifer forests at elevations up to 2000 m (6700 feet).[2][3][4] Vaccinium boreale is a small shrub up to 9 cm (3.6 inches) tall, forming dense colonies of many individuals. Twigs are green, angled, with lines of hairs. Leaves are deciduous, narrowly elliptic, up to 21 mm (0.85 inches) long, with teeth along the margins. Flowers are white, up to 4 mm long. Berries are blue, up to 5 mm (0.2 inches) across.[5][6][7] References[edit]^ http://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=VABO ^ Flora of North America v 8 p 528. ^ Vander Kloet, S. P. 1977
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Vaccinium Hirsutum
Cyanococcus hirsutus (Buckley) SmallVaccinium hirsutum is a species of flowering plant in the heath family known by the common name hairy blueberry. This species is endemic to a small area in the southern Appalachian mountains, where it is only known from a few counties in eastern Tennessee, northern Georgia, and the Carolinas.[2] Vaccinium hirsutum is native to dry oak-pine ridges, where it can be locally abundant. It is a shrub up to 75 cm (28 inches) tall, forming large colonies. Leaves are rather thick, elliptical, densely hairy, up to 62 mm (2 1/2 inches) long.[3] Vaccinium hirsutum produces white, cylindrical flowers in late spring, followed by hairy, black berries in the summer.[3] References[edit]^ Tropicos, Vaccinium hirsutum Buckley ^ Biota of North America Program 2014 county distribution map ^ a b Flora of North America. Vaccinium hirsutum Buckley, 1843
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