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Bluebeard
"Bluebeard" (French: Barbe bleue) is a French folktale, the most famous surviving version of which was written by Charles Perrault
Charles Perrault
and first published by Barbin in Paris in 1697 in Histoires ou contes du temps passé.[1][2] The tale tells the story of a wealthy violent man in the habit of murdering his wives and the attempts of one wife to avoid the fate of her predecessors
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E. L. Blanchard
Edward Litt Laman Blanchard, often referred to as E. L. Blanchard (11 December 1820 – 4 September 1889),[1] was an English writer who is best known for his contributions to the Drury Lane pantomime. He began writing plays and other literature to support himself as a teenager after his father died. He soon became a prolific creator of dramas and eventually gained critical acclaim for his works
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The Arabian Nights
StylesArchitecture of ancient Yemen Nabataean architecture Umayyad architecture Abbasid architecture Fatimid architecture Moorish architecture Mamluk
Mamluk
architectureFeaturesAblaq Hypostyle Mashrabiya Iwan Liwan Riwaq Qadad Moroccan riad Sahn Tadelakt Vaulting Voussoir Multifoil arch Horseshoe arch Arabic
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Lot's Wife
In the Bible, Lot's wife
Lot's wife
is a figure first mentioned in Genesis 19. The Book of Genesis
Book of Genesis
describes how she became a pillar of salt after she looked back at Sodom. She is not named in the Bible
Bible
but is called "Ado" or "Edith" in some Jewish traditions. She is also referred to in the deuterocanonical books at Wisdom 10:7 and the New Testament
New Testament
at Luke 17:32
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PANDORA
In Greek mythology, Pandora
Pandora
(Greek: Πανδώρα, derived from πᾶν, pān, i.e. "all" and δῶρον, dōron, i.e. "gift", thus "the all-endowed", "the all-gifted" or "the all-giving")[1] was the first human woman created by the gods, specifically by Hephaestus
Hephaestus
and Athena
Athena
on the instructions of Zeus.[2][3] As Hesiod
Hesiod
related it, each god helped create her by giving her unique gifts. Zeus
Zeus
ordered Hephaestus
Hephaestus
to mold her out of earth as part of the punishment of humanity for Prometheus' theft of the secret of fire, and all the gods joined in offering her "seductive gifts"
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Cupid And Psyche
Cupid
Cupid
and Psyche is a story originally from Metamorphoses (also called The Golden Ass), written in the 2nd century AD by Lucius Apuleius Madaurensis (or Platonicus).[2] It concerns the overcoming of obstacles to the love between Psyche (/ˈsaɪkiː/, Greek: Ψυχή [pʰsyː.kʰɛ᷄ː], "Soul" or "Breath of Life") and Cupid
Cupid
(Latin Cupido, "Desire") or Amor ("Love", Greek Eros
Eros
’′Ερως), and their ultimate union in a sacred marriage. Although the only extended narrative from antiquity is that of Apuleius, Eros
Eros
and Psyche appear in Greek art as early as the 4th century BC
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Gustave Doré
Paul Gustave Louis Christophe Doré (/dɔːˈreɪ/; French: [ɡys.tav dɔ.ʁe]; 6 January 1832 – 23 January 1883) was a French artist, printmaker, illustrator, comics artist, caricaturist and sculptor who worked primarily with wood engraving.Contents1 Biography 2 Gallery 3 Works 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksBiography[edit]Doré by Carolus-Duran
Carolus-Duran
(1877)Doré was born in Strasbourg
Strasbourg
on 6 January 1832. By age five, he was a prodigy troublemaker, playing pranks that were mature beyond his years. Seven years later, he began carving in cement. At the age of fifteen Doré began his career working as a caricaturist for the French paper Le Journal pour rire,[1]. In the late 1840s and early 1850s he made several text comics, like Les Travaux d'Hercule (1847), Trois artistes incompris et mécontents (1851), Les Dés-agréments d'un voyage d'agrément (1851) and L'Histoire de la Sainte Russie (1854)
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Garden Of Eden
The Garden of Eden
Garden of Eden
(Hebrew גַּן עֵדֶן, Gan ʿEḏen) or (often) Paradise, is the biblical "garden of God", described most notably in the Book of Genesis
Book of Genesis
chapters 2 and 3, and also in the Book of Ezekiel.[2][3] Genesis 13:10 refers to the "garden of God" (not called Eden by name),[4] and the "trees of the garden" are mentioned in Ezekiel
Ezekiel
31.[5] The Book of Zechariah
Book of Zechariah
and the Book of Psalms
Book of Psalms
also refer to trees and water in relation to the temple without explicitly mentioning Eden.[6] Traditionally, scholars favored deriving the name "Eden" from the Akkadian
Akkadian
edinnu, derived from a Sumerian word edin meaning "plain" or "steppe"
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Pentamerone
The Pentamerone
Pentamerone
(Neapolitan subtitle: Lo cunto de li cunti, "The Tale of Tales") is a seventeenth-century fairy tale collection by Italian poet and courtier Giambattista Basile.Contents1 Background 2 Influence 3 Geography of the stories 4 Synopsis 5 Translations 6 Adaptations 7 Further reading 8 References 9 External linksBackground[edit] The stories in the Pentamerone
Pentamerone
were collected by Basile and published posthumously in two volumes by his sister Adriana in Naples, Italy, in 1634 and 1636 under the pseudonym Gian Alesio Abbatutis
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The Three Crowns
The Three Crowns is an Italian literary fairy tale written by Giambattista Basile
Giambattista Basile
in his 1634 work, the Pentamerone.[1] Synopsis[edit] A childless king heard a voice asking him whether he would rather have a daughter who would flee him or a son who would destroy him. After consulting his wise men, who argued over whether the danger to life or honor was the worse, he concluded that the daughter would be less harmful to his realm; he went back to the garden and answered the voice that he wanted the daughter. She was born, and her father tried to shelter her in a castle, but when she was fifteen, he concluded a marriage for her. When she left to go to her husband, a whirlwind carried her off. The wind left her at an ogress's house in the forest
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Aarne–Thompson
The Aarne–Thompson classification systems are indices used to classify folktales: the Aarne–Thompson Motif-Index (catalogued by alphabetical letters followed by numerals), the Aarne–Thompson Tale Type Index (cataloged by AT or AaTh numbers), and the Aarne–Thompson–Uther classification system (developed in 2004 and cataloged by ATU numbers)
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Walter Crane
Walter Crane
Walter Crane
(15 August 1845 – 14 March 1915) was an English artist and book illustrator. He is considered to be the most influential, and among the most prolific, children’s book creators of his generation[1] and, along with Randolph Caldecott
Randolph Caldecott
and Kate Greenaway, one of the strongest contributors to the child's nursery motif that the genre of English children's illustrated literature would exhibit in its developmental stages in the latter 19th century. Crane's work featured some of the more colourful and detailed beginnings of the child-in-the-garden motifs that would characterize many nursery rhymes and children's stories for decades to come. He was part of the Arts and Crafts movement
Arts and Crafts movement
and produced an array of paintings, illustrations, children's books, ceramic tiles and other decorative arts
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The Old Dame And Her Hen
"The Old Dame and her Hen" is the English title given by Dasent[1] to the Norwegian folk tale, Asbjørnsen and Moe’s number 35. The tale's original title, "Høna tripper i berget" is more accurately rendered "The Hen is Tripping in the Mountain", as given in Reidar Thoralf Christiansen's translation.[2] The tale is categorized as Aarne-Thompson type 311, "Rescue by the Sister."[2][3]Contents1 Editions 2 Synopsis 3 Variants3.1 Localization4 Aarne-Thompson classification 5 Footnotes5.1 Explanatory notes 5.2 Citations6 References 7 External linksEditions[edit] The Norwegian folktal
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Child Ballad
The Child Ballads
Child Ballads
are 305 traditional ballads from England and Scotland, and their American variants, anthologized by Francis James Child during the second half of the 19th century. Their lyrics and Child's studies of them were published as the 2,500-page book The English and Scottish Popular Ballads. The tunes of most of the ballads were collected and published by Bertrand Harris Bronson in and around the 1960s.[1]Barbara AllenChild Ballad
Ballad
#84
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Wilhelm Grimm
Wilhelm Carl Grimm (also Karl;[a] 24 February 1786 – 16 December 1859) was a German author and anthropologist, and the younger brother of Jacob Grimm, of the library duo the Brothers Grimm.Contents1 Life and work 2 Notes 3 References 4 External linksLife and work[edit] Wilhelm was born in Hanau, in Hesse-Kassel. In 1803, he started studying law at the University of Marburg, one year after his brother Jacob started there. The two brothers spent their entire lives close together. In their school days, they had one bed and one table in common; as students, they had two beds and two tables in the same room. They always lived under one roof and had their books and property in common.[5]Grimms' tomb in BerlinIn 1825, 39-year-old Wilhelm married pharmacist's daughter Henriette Dorothea Wild, also known as Dortchen
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