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Blue Period (song)
Period may refer to:Era, a length or span of time Full stop
Full stop
(or period), a punctuation mark Menstruation, also called a "period"Contents1 Science and mathematics 2 Arts 3 Other uses 4 See alsoScience and mathematicsUnit of time Period (physics), the duration of time of one cycle in a repeating event Orbi
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Era
If Wiktionary
Wiktionary
has a definition already, change this tag to TWCleanup2 or else consider a soft redirect to Wiktionary
Wiktionary
by replacing the text on this page with Wi
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Historical Period Drama
The term historical period drama (also historical drama, period drama, costume drama, and period piece) refers to a work set in a past time period, usually used in the context of film and television. It is an informal crossover term that can apply to several genres and is often heard in the context of historical fiction and romances, adventure films and swashbucklers. A period piece may be set in a vague or general era such as the middle ages or a specific period such as the Roaring Twenties. A religious work can qualify as period drama but not as historical drama.Contents1 Historical accuracy 2 Examples 3 See also 4 Notes 5 External linksHistorical accuracy[edit] Some works attempt to accurately portray historical events or persons, to the degree that the available historical research will allow. These types of works are also known as docudrama, examples being Cinderella Man, Schindler’s List, and Lincoln
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Periodicity (other)
Periodicity or periodic may refer to: In mathematics[edit]Periodic function, a function whose output contains values that repeat periodically Periodic mapping Bott periodicity, a modulo-8 recurrence relation in the homotopy groups of classical groupsIn the physical sciences[edit]Periodic trends, relative characteristics of chemical elements observed Redshift periodicity, astronomical term for redshift quantizationOther uses[edit]Principle of periodicity, in generally accepted accounting principles Fokker periodicity blocks, which mathematically relate musical intervalsSee also[edit]Quasiperiodicity, property of a system that displays irregular periodicity Aperiodic (other) Period (other) Cycle (other) Frequency (other) Seasonalit
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Full Stop (other)
Full stop
Full stop
can refer to:Full stop, a form of punctuation also known as a "period" Full Stop (album), an album by Annabelle Chvostek "Full Stop", a song by Frank Klepacki "Ful Stop", a song by Radiohead
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Periodization
Periodization
Periodization
is the process or study of categorizing the past into discrete, quantified named blocks of time[1] in order to facilitate the study and analysis of history. This results in descriptive abstractions that provide convenient terms for periods of time with relatively stable characteristics. However, determining the precise beginning and ending to any "period" is often arbitrary. It has changed over time in history. To the extent that history is continuous and ungeneralizable, all systems of periodization are more or less arbitrary
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Duration (other)
Duration may refer to:The amount of elapsed time between two events Duration (music)
Duration (music)
– an amount of time or a particular time interval, often cited as one of the fundamental aspects of music
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Iodine
Iodine
Iodine
is a chemical element with symbol I and atomic number 53. The heaviest of the stable halogens, it exists as a lustrous, purple-black metallic solid at standard conditions that sublimes readily to form a violet gas. The elemental form was discovered by the French chemist Bernard Courtois in 1811. It was named two years later by Joseph-Louis Gay-Lussac from this property, after the Greek ἰώδης "violet-coloured". Iodine
Iodine
occurs in many oxidation states, including iodide (I−), iodate (IO− 3), and the various periodate anions. It is the least abundant of the stable halogens, being the sixty-first most abundant element. It is even less abundant than the so-called rare earths. It is the heaviest essential mineral nutrient
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Oxidation State
The oxidation state, sometimes referred to as oxidation number, describes degree of oxidation (loss of electrons) of an atom in a chemical compound. Conceptually, the oxidation state, which may be positive, negative or zero, is the hypothetical charge that an atom would have if all bonds to atoms of different elements were 100% ionic, with no covalent component. This is never exactly true for real bonds. The term oxidation was first used by Antoine Lavoisier
Antoine Lavoisier
to signify reaction of a substance with oxygen. Much later, it was realized that the substance, upon being oxidized, loses electrons, and the meaning was extended to include other reactions in which electrons are lost. Oxidation
Oxidation
states are typically represented by integers which may be positive, zero, or negative. In some cases, the average oxidation state of an element is a fraction, such as ​8⁄3 for iron in magnetite (Fe 3O 4)
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Period (school)
A school period is a block of time allocated for lessons, classes in schools.[1] They typically last between 40 and 60 minutes, with around 3-8 periods per school day. However, especially in higher education, there can be many more. Educators determine the number and length of these periods, and may even regulate how each period will be used. One common example of this practice is to designate at least one compulsory period a day for physical education.[2] Free period[edit] One special example of a high school period is the free period these typically occur after 15 minutes of being unattended. A free period (often abbreviated to "free" and also known as a "spare" or "unstructured") is generally found in most high schools and colleges. During a free period, a student can either:Walk around the campus freely until the next period
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Antique Furniture
A piece of antique furniture is a collectible interior furnishing of considerable age. Often the age, rarity, condition, utility, or other unique features make a piece of furniture desirable as a collectors' item, and thus termed an antique. The antique furniture pieces reflect the style and features of the time they were made; this can be called the antique's "period" (Eduardian, Tudor, Colonial, etc.). Antique
Antique
furniture may support the human body (such as seating or beds), provide storage, or hold objects on horizontal surfaces above the ground. Storage furniture (which often makes use of doors, drawers, and shelves) is used to hold or contain smaller objects such as clothes, tools, books, and household goods. Furniture
Furniture
can be a product of artistic design and is considered a form of decorative art. In addition to furniture's functional role, it can serve a symbolic or religious purpose
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Period (music)
In music, period refers to certain types of recurrence in small-scale formal structure. In twentieth-century music scholarship, the term is usually used as defined by the Oxford Companion to Music: "a period consists of two phrases, antecedent and consequent, each of which begins with the same basic motif." [3] Earlier usage varied somewhat, but usually referred to similar notions of symmetry, recurrence, and closure
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Full Stop
؋ ​₳ ​ ฿ ​₿ ​ ₵ ​¢ ​₡ ​₢ ​ $ ​₫ ​₯ ​֏ ​ ₠ ​€ ​ ƒ ​₣ ​ ₲ ​ ₴ ​ ₭ ​ ₺ ​₾ ​ ₼ ​ℳ ​₥ ​ ₦ ​ ₧ ​₱ ​₰ ​£ ​ 元 圆 圓 ​﷼ ​៛ ​₽ ​₹ ₨ ​ ₪ ​ ৳ ​₸ ​₮ ​ ₩ ​ ¥ 円Uncommon typographyasterism ⁂fleuron, hedera ❧index, fist ☞interrobang ‽irony punctuation ⸮lozenge ◊tie ⁀RelatedDiacritics Logic symbolsWhitespace charactersIn other scriptsChinese Hebrew Japanese Korean Category Portal Bookv t eThe full point or full stop (British and broader Commonwealth English) or period (North American English) is a punctuation mark. It is used for several purposes, the most frequent of which is to mark the end of a sentence (other than a question or exclamation); this sentence-terminal use is properly the full stop
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Periods (ring)
In mathematics, a period is a number that can be expressed as an integral of an algebraic function over an algebraic domain. Sums and products of periods remain periods, so the periods form a ring. Maxim Kontsevich
Maxim Kontsevich
and Don Zagier (2001) gave a survey of periods and introduced some conjectures about them.Contents1 Definition 2 Examples 3 Purpose of the classification 4 Conjectures 5 References 6 External linksDefinition[edit] A real number is called a period if it is the difference of volumes of regions of Euclidean space given by polynomial inequalities with rational coefficients
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Period Of A Function
In mathematics, a periodic function is a function that repeats its values in regular intervals or periods. The most important examples are the trigonometric functions, which repeat over intervals of 2π radians. Periodic functions are used throughout science to describe oscillations, waves, and other phenomena that exhibit periodicity. Any function that is not periodic is called aperiodic.An illustration of a periodic function with period P . displaystyle P
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