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Bloody Knife
American Indian WarsBattle of the Little Big Horn † Bloody Knife
Bloody Knife
(Sioux:Tamena Way Way or Tamina WeWe; Arikara:Nes I Ri Pat or Nee si Ra Pat; ca. 1840 – June 25, 1876) was an American Indian who served as a scout and guide for the U.S. 7th Cavalry Regiment.[1][2] He was the favorite scout of Lieutenant Colonel George Armstrong Custer and has been called "perhaps the most famous Native American scout to serve the U.S. Army."[2] Bloody Knife
Bloody Knife
was born to a Hunkpapa
Hunkpapa
Sioux
Sioux
father and an Arikara
Arikara
mother around 1840. He was abused and discriminated against by the other Sioux
Sioux
in his village because of his background, in particular by Gall, a future chief
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Dakota Territory
The Territory of Dakota was an organized incorporated territory of the United States that existed from March 2, 1861, until November 2, 1889, when the final extent of the reduced territory was split and admitted to the Union as the states of North and South Dakota.Contents1 History 2 Dakota Territory
Dakota Territory
in the American Civil War 3 Dakota Territory
Dakota Territory
and statehood 4 In popular culture 5 See also 6 Footnotes 7 Further reading 8 External linksHistory[edit] The Dakota Territory
Dakota Territory
consisted of the northernmost part of the land acquired in the Louisiana purchase in 1803, as well as the southernmost part of Rupert's Land, which was acquired in 1818 when the boundary was changed to the 49th parallel
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President Of The United States
House of RepresentativesSpeaker Paul Ryan
Paul Ryan
(R)Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R)Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi
Nancy Pelosi
(D)Co
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Fort Totten, North Dakota
Fort Totten is a census-designated place (CDP) in Benson County, North Dakota, United States. The population was 1,243 at the 2010 census.[2] Fort Totten is located within the Spirit Lake Indian Reservation and is the site of tribal headquarters. The reservation has a total population estimated at 6,000. Although not formally incorporated as a city, Fort Totten has the largest population of any community in Benson County.[5]Contents1 Geography 2 Demographics 3 Sites of interest 4 Climate 5 External links 6 ReferencesGeography[edit] According to the United States Census
Census
Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 8.8 square miles (23 km2), of which 8.6 square miles (22 km2) is land and 0.2 square miles (0.52 km2) (2.77%) is water. Demographics[edit]Historical populationCensus Pop.%±1990 867—2000 9529.8%2010 1,24330.6%U.S
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Counting Coup
Counting coup
Counting coup
was the winning of prestige against an enemy by the Plains Indians
Plains Indians
of North America. Warriors won prestige by acts of bravery in the face of the enemy, which could be recorded in various ways and retold as stories
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Ramrod
A ramrod is a metal or wooden device used with early firearms to push the projectile up against the propellant (mainly gunpowder). It is also commonly referred to as a "scouring stick". The ramrod was used with muzzle-loading weapons such as muskets and cannons, and was usually held in a notch underneath the barrel. Bullets that did not fit snugly in the barrel were often secured in place by a wad of paper, but either way, ramming was necessary to place the bullet securely at the rear of the barrel
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Scalping
Scalping
Scalping
is the act of cutting or tearing a part of the human scalp, with hair attached, from the head of an enemy as a trophy.[1] Scalp-taking is considered part of the broader cultural practice of the taking and display of human body parts as trophies, and may have developed as an alternative to the taking of human heads, for scalps were easier to take, transport, and preserve for subsequent display. Scalping
Scalping
independently developed in various cultures in both the Old and New Worlds.[2]Contents1 In Asia, Africa, and Europe 2 In the Americas2.1 Techniques 2.2 Intertribal warfare 2.3 Colonial wars 2.4 American Revolution 2.5 Mexico 2.6 Civil War 2.7 American Indian Wars3 Image gallery 4 See also 5 References 6 Bibliography 7 External linksIn Asia, Africa, and Europe[edit] In England in 1036, Earl Godwin, father of Harold Godwinson, was reportedly responsible for scalping his enemies
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Brigadier General
Brigadier
Brigadier
general (Brig. Gen.) is a senior rank in the armed forces. It is the lowest ranking general officer in some countries, usually sitting between the ranks of colonel and major general. When appointed to a field command, a brigadier general is typically in command of a brigade consisting of around 4,000 troops (four battalions). In some countries a brigadier general is informally designated as a one-star general (OF-6). In some countries, this rank is given the name of brigadier, which is often considered not to be a general-officer rank, but is usually equivalent to brigadier general in the armies of nations that use the rank. The rank can be traced back to the militaries of Europe where a brigadier general, or simply a brigadier, would command a brigade in the field
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Galvanized Yankees
Galvanized Yankees was a term from the American Civil War
American Civil War
denoting former Confederate prisoners of war who swore allegiance to the United States and joined the Union Army. Approximately 5,600 former Confederate soldiers enlisted in the "United States Volunteers", organized into six regiments of infantry between January 1864 and November 1866. Of those, more than 250 had begun their service as Union soldiers, were captured in battle, then enlisted in prison to join a regiment of the Confederate States Army. They surrendered to Union forces in December 1864 and were held by the United States as deserters, but were saved from prosecution by being enlisted in the 5th and 6th U.S. Volunteers.[1] An additional 800 former Confederates served in volunteer regiments raised by the states, forming ten companies
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Confederate States Army
1,082,119 total who served[1]464,646 peak in 1863Part of C.S. War DepartmentColors Cadet gray
Cadet gray
     [2]March "Dixie"EngagementsAmerican Indian Wars Cortina Troubles American Civil WarSumter First Manassas Wilson's Creek Henry and Donelson Shenandoah South Mills Richmond Harpers Ferry Munfordville Shepherdstown Chambersburg
Chambersburg
Raid Mississippi
Mississippi
River Peninsula Shiloh Jackson's Valley Campaign Second Manassas Sharpsburg Hartsville Fredericksburg Murfreesborough Chancellorsville Gettysburg Vicksburg Corydon Chickamauga Chattanooga Wilderness Atlanta Spotsylvania New Hope Church Pickett's Mill Cold Harbor Sabine Pass Plymouth Fort Pillow Petersburg St. Albans Kennesaw Mountain Jonesborough Franklin Nashville Appomattox Court HouseCommandersCommander-in-Chief Jefferson Davis
Jefferson Davis
 General-in-Chief
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Union (American Civil War)
During the American Civil War
American Civil War
(1861–1865), the Union referred to the United States
United States
of America and specifically to the national government of President Abraham Lincoln
Abraham Lincoln
and the 20 free states, 4 border and slave states (some with split governments and troops sent both north and south) that supported it. The Union was opposed by 11 southern slave states (or 13, according to the Southern view and one western territory) that formed the Confederate States of America, or also known as "the Confederacy". All of the Union's states provided soldiers for the United States
United States
Army (also known as the Union Army), though the border areas also sent tens of thousands of soldiers south into the Confederacy
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Prisoner-of-war Camp
A prisoner-of-war camp is a site for the containment of enemy combatants captured by a belligerent power in time of war. There are significant differences among POW camps, internment camps, and military prisons. Purpose built prisoner-of-war camps appeared at Norman Cross
Norman Cross
in England in 1797 and HM Prison
Prison
Dartmoor, both constructed during the Napoleonic Wars, and they have been in use in all the main conflicts of the last 200 years. The main camps are used for coast guards, marines, sailors, soldiers, and more recently, airmen of an enemy power who have been captured by a belligerent power during or immediately after an armed conflict
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Andrew Johnson
United States ArmyUnion ArmyYears of service 1862–1865Rank Brigadier GeneralBattles/wars American Civil War Andrew Johnson
Andrew Johnson
(December 29, 1808 – July 31, 1875) was the 17th President of the United States, serving from 1865 to 1869. Johnson became president as he was vice president at the time of the assassination of Abraham Lincoln. A Democrat who ran with Lincoln on the National Union ticket, Johnson came to office as the Civil War concluded. The new president favored quick restoration of the seceded states to the Union. His plans did not give protection to the former slaves, and he came into conflict with the Republican-dominated Congress, culminating in his impeachment by the House of Representatives. He was acquitted in the Senate by one vote. Johnson was born in poverty in Raleigh, North Carolina
Raleigh, North Carolina
and never attended school
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Montana
Montana
Montana
/mɒnˈtænə/ ( listen) is a U.S. state
U.S. state
in the northwestern region of the United States. Montana
Montana
has several nicknames, although none official,[6] including "Big Sky Country" and "The Treasure State", and slogans that include "Land of the Shining Mountains" and more recently "The Last Best Place".[7] Montana
Montana
is the 4th largest in area, the 8th least populous, and the 3rd most sparsely populated of the 50 U.S. states. The western third of Montana
Montana
contains numerous mountain ranges. Smaller island ranges are found throughout the state. In total, 77 named ranges are part of the Rocky Mountains. The eastern half of Montana
Montana
is characterized by western prairie terrain and badlands. The economy is primarily based on agriculture, including ranching and cereal grain farming
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Fort Stevenson
Fort Stevenson was a frontier military fort in the 19th century in what was then Dakota Territory
Dakota Territory
and what is now North Dakota. The fort was named for Thomas G. Stevenson, a Civil War general who was killed in the Battle of Spotsylvania. It was built in 1867 and abandoned in 1883.[1] Life at the fort features heavily in the memoir of Régis de Trobriand, the commander of the fort. He describes interactions with the Mandan, Hidatsa, and Arikara
Arikara
tribes, and their hostilities with another group of tribes, the Sioux.[2] The fort was abandoned in 1883 with the sale of all buildings and property. In 1901 the lands encompassing the Fort Stevenson Military Reservation were sold to Black and Associates, a group of eastern businessmen. The group originally planned to raise sugar beets on the acreages but instead dropped those plans and sold off much of the land to adjacent landowners
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Alcoholism
Alcoholism, also known as alcohol use disorder (AUD), is a broad term for any drinking of alcohol that results in mental or physical health problems.[12] The disorder was previously divided into two types: alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence.[1][13] In a medical context, alcoholism is said to exist when two or more of the following conditions is present: a person drinks large amounts over a long time period, has difficulty cutting down, acquiring and drinking alcohol takes up a great deal of time, alcohol is strongly desired, usage results in not fulfilling responsibilities, usage results in social problems, usage results in health problems, usage results in risky situations, withdrawal occurs when stopping, and alcohol tolerance has occurred with use.[1] Risky situations include drinking and driving or having unsafe sex, among other things.[1] Alcohol use can affect all parts of the body, but it particularly affects the brain, heart, liver, pancreas, and immune system.[3][4] This can
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