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Blind Fury
Blind Fury
Blind Fury
is a 1989 American samurai action comedy film written by Charles Robert Carner (of Gymkata
Gymkata
fame) and directed by Phillip Noyce. It is a loosely based, modernized remake of Zatoichi Challenged, the 17th film in the Japanese Zatoichi film series.[2] The film stars Rutger Hauer
Rutger Hauer
as Nick Parker, a blind, sword-wielding Vietnam War veteran, who returns to the United States and befriends the son of an old friend. Parker decides to help the boy find his father, who has been kidnapped by a major crime syndicate.Contents1 Plot summary 2 Cast 3 Production 4 Release4.1 Reception 4.2 Censorship5 References 6 External linksPlot summary[edit] While serving in Vietnam, American soldier Nick Parker (Rutger Hauer) was blinded by a mortar explosion
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IMDb
IMDb, also known as Internet Movie Database, is an online database of information related to world films, television programs, home videos and video games, and internet streams, including cast, production crew, personnel and fictional character biographies, plot summaries, trivia, and fan reviews and ratings. An additional fan feature, message boards, was abandoned in February, 2017. The database is owned and operated by IMDb.com, Inc., a subsidiary of Amazon. As of December 2017[update], IMDb
IMDb
has approximately 4.7 million titles (including episodes) and 8.3 million personalities in its database,[2] as well as 83 million registered users. The movie and talent pages of IMDb
IMDb
are accessible to all internet users, but a registration process is necessary to contribute information to the site. Most data in the database is provided by volunteer contributors
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Jay Pennison
Jay Leslie Pennison (born September 9, 1961 in Houma, Louisiana) is a former professional American football center who played in the United States Football League (USFL) and the National Football League (NFL).Contents1 Early years 2 Professional career 3 References 4 External linksEarly years[edit] Pennison is a graduate of South Terrebonne High School class of 1979. He walked-on to the Nicholls State University football team as a tight end, but was subsequently moved to center. He had previously played the position in high school during his sophomore and junior seasons. While at Nicholls State, Pennison was named second-team Associated Press All-American during the 1982 and 1983 seasons. Professional career[edit] Pennison signed as an undrafted free agent with the Washington Redskins in 1984, but was cut late in the preseason. Also in 1984, Pennison was drafted in the thirteenth round (270th overall) of the 1984 USFL Draft by the Jacksonville Bulls
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Tri-Star Pictures
TriStar Pictures
TriStar Pictures
(spelled as Tri-Star until 1991 and stylized as TRISTAR) is an American film studio that is a division of the Sony Pictures Motion Picture Group,[1] owned by the Sony
Sony
subsidiary Sony Pictures Entertainment.Contents1 History1.1 Columbia Pictures
Columbia Pictures
Entertainment era (1987–1989) 1.2 Sony
Sony
era (1989–present)2 Logo 3 Filmography 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] The concept for TriStar Pictures
TriStar Pictures
was the brainchild of Victor Kaufman, a senior executive of Columbia Pictures
Columbia Pictures
(then a subsidiary of the Coca-Cola Company),[3] who convinced the studio, HBO, and CBS
CBS
to pool resources and split the ever-growing costs of making movies, creating a new joint venture in 1982
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Lynn Manning
Lynn Manning (April 30, 1955 – August 3, 2015) was an American playwright, poet and actor known for his autobiographical work that explores the complexities of life as a blind African-American man.[1]Contents1 Biography 2 Early life 3 Accomplishments 4 'Weights' 5 Personal life 6 References 7 External linksBiography[edit] Lynn Manning's life was turned upside down when he was left blind after being shot in the face in a Hollywood bar in 1978, when he was 23 years old.[1] He made a name for himself as a playwright and actor. He is best known for his semi-autobiographical work Weights, which premiered in Los Angeles in 2001. The play won three NAACP Theatre Awards including Best Actor for Manning and has since been performed throughout the country, including at the Theater By The Blind in New York City
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Midwestern United States
The Midwestern United States, also referred to as the American Midwest, Middle West, or simply the Midwest, is one of four geographic regions defined by the United States
United States
Census Bureau. It occupies the northern central part of the United States
United States
of America.[2] It was officially named the North Central region by the Census Bureau until 1984.[3] It is located between the Northeastern U.S.
Northeastern U.S.
and the Western U.S., with Canada
Canada
to its north and the Southern U.S.
Southern U.S.
to its south. The Census Bureau's definition consists of 12 states in the north central United States: Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin
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Reno, Nevada
Reno (/ˈriːnoʊ/ REE-noh) is a city in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Nevada. It is in Northern Nevada, approximately 22 miles (35 km) from Lake Tahoe. Known as "The Biggest Little City
City
in the World",[2] Reno is famous for its hotels and casinos and as the birthplace of Harrah's Entertainment (now known as Caesars Entertainment Corporation). It is the county seat of Washoe County, in the northwestern part of the state. The city sits in a high desert at the foot of the Sierra Nevada and its downtown area (along with Sparks) occupies a valley informally known as the Truckee Meadows. It is named after slain Union general Jesse L
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Tim Matheson
Tim Matheson
Tim Matheson
(born Timothy Lewis Matthieson; December 31, 1947) is an American actor and television director.[1] He is perhaps best known for his portrayals of the smooth-talking Eric "Otter" Stratton in the comedy film National Lampoon's Animal House
Animal House
(1978) and of Vice President John Hoynes
John Hoynes
in the NBC drama The West Wing
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Principal Photography
Principal photography
Principal photography
is the phase of film production in which the movie is filmed, with actors on set and cameras rolling, as distinct from pre-production and post-production.[1] Principal photography
Principal photography
is typically the most expensive phase of film production, due to actor, director, and set crew salaries, as well as the costs of certain shots, props, and on-set special effects
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Mortar (weapon)
A mortar is an indirect fire device that launches projectiles at ranges from 70 meters to 14,000 meters. The mortar has traditionally been used as a weapon to propel explosive shells called mortar rounds in high-arcing ballistic trajectories. The weapon is typically muzzle-loading with a short, often smooth-bore barrel, generally less than 15 times its caliber. Modern mortars are light and easily portable. They can be used for close fire support with a variety of ammunition.Contents1 History1.1 Origins 1.2 Modern portable mortar 1.3 Largest mortars 1.4 Improvised mortars2 Function 3 Design3.1 Distinctive features of mortars 3.2 Spigot mortar 3.3 Gun-mortars4 Images 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] Origins[edit] Mortars have been used for hundreds of years, originally in siege warfare. Many historians consider the first mortars to have been used at the 1453 siege of Constantinople by Mehmed the Conqueror
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Vietnam War
North Vietnamese victoryWithdrawal of American-led forces from Indochina Communist governments take power in South Vietnam, Cambodia
Cambodia
and Laos South Vietnam
South Vietnam
is annexed by North VietnamTerritorial changes Reunification of North and
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Crime Syndicate
The National Crime Syndicate was the name given by the press to the multi-ethnic, loosely connected American confederation of several criminal organizations, a confederation that mostly consisted of the closely interconnected Italian- American Mafia
American Mafia
and Jewish mob
Jewish mob
but also included to various lesser extents Irish-American criminal organizations and other ethnic crime groups
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Vietnam Veteran
A Vietnam veteran
Vietnam veteran
is someone who served in the armed forces of participating countries during the Vietnam War. The term has been used to describe veterans who were in the armed forces of South Vietnam, the United States
United States
armed forces, and countries allied to them, whether or not they were stationed in Vietnam during their service. However, the more common usage distinguishes between those who served "in country" and those who did not serve in Vietnam by referring to the "in country" veterans as "Vietnam veterans" and the others as "Vietnam-era veterans". The U.S
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At The Movies (U.S. TV Series)
At the Movies (originally Siskel & Ebert & the Movies, and later At the Movies with Ebert and Roeper) is a movie review television program produced by Disney-ABC Domestic Television
Disney-ABC Domestic Television
in which two film critics share their opinions of newly released films. Its original hosts were Roger Ebert
Roger Ebert
and Gene Siskel, the former hosts of Sneak Previews
Sneak Previews
on PBS (1975–1982) and a similarly-titled syndicated series (1982–1986). Following Siskel's death in 1999, Ebert worked with various guest critics until choosing Chicago
Chicago
Sun-Times colleague Richard Roeper
Richard Roeper
as his regular partner in 2000. Ebert suspended his appearances in 2006 for treatment of thyroid cancer, with various guest hosts substituting for him
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Remake
A remake is a film or television series that is based on an earlier work and tells the same, or a very similar, story.[1] A reimagining, however, is a remake that is not directly identical to the original.Contents1 Film 2 Television 3 Video games 4 Reimagine or renovate 5 Re-version 6 See also 7 ReferencesFilm[edit] The term "remake" is generally used in reference to a movie which uses an earlier movie as the main source material, rather than in reference to a second, later movie based on the same source. For example, 2001's Ocean's Eleven
Ocean's Eleven
is a remake of Ocean's 11, while 1989's Batman is a re-interpretation of the comic book source material which also inspired 1966's Batman. In 1998, Gus Van Sant
Gus Van Sant
produced an almost shot-for-shot remake of Alfred Hitchcock's 1960 film Psycho. With the exception of shot-for-shot remakes, most remakes make significant character, plot, genre and theme changes
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Roger Ebert
Roger Joseph Ebert (/ˈiːbərt/; June 18, 1942 – April 4, 2013) was an American film critic, historian, journalist, screenwriter, and author. He was a film critic for the Chicago
Chicago
Sun-Times from 1967 until his death in 2013. In 1975, Ebert became the first film critic to win the Pulitzer Prize
Pulitzer Prize
for Criticism. Ebert and Chicago
Chicago
Tribune critic Gene Siskel
Gene Siskel
helped popularize nationally televised film reviewing when they co-hosted the PBS
PBS
show Sneak Previews, followed by several variously named At the Movies programs. The two verbally sparred and traded humorous barbs while discussing films. They created and trademarked the phrase "Two Thumbs Up," used when both hosts gave the same film a positive review
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