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Black-ish
Black-ish
Black-ish
(stylized as blackish) is an American sitcom starring Anthony Anderson
Anthony Anderson
and Tracee Ellis Ross, broadcast on ABC.[1][2] The single-camera comedy centers on an upper-middle-class African-American fami
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Shades Of Black
Shades of black
Shades of black
are colors that differ only slightly from pure black. These colors have a low lightness. From photometric point of view, a color which differs slightly from black always has low relative luminance. Variations of black include what are commonly termed off-black colors, which may be considered part of a neutral color scheme, usually in interior design as a part of a background for brighter colors. Black
Black
and dark gray colors are powerful accent colors that suggest weight, dignity, formality, and solemnity.[1] In color theory, a shade is a pure color mixed with black. It decreases its lightness while nearly conserving its chromaticity. Strictly speaking, a "shade of black" is always a pure black itself and a "tint of black" would be a neutral gray
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Disney–ABC Domestic Television
Disney–ABC Domestic Television, also operating as ABC Syndication[1] (formerly known as Buena Vista Television, Inc., also known as Disney Domestic Television
Television
and currently known as Disney–ABC Home Entertainment and Television
Television
Distribution), is the in-home sales and content distribution firm of the Disney–ABC Television
Television
Group, a division of The Walt Disney Company
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Diane Farr
Diane Farr (born September 7, 1969) is an American actress, producer, and writer. She is known for her roles as the FBI agent Megan Reeves in the CBS
CBS
television series Numb3rs and the firefighter Laura Miles in Rescue Me.Contents1 Life and career 2 Personal life 3 Filmography3.1 Film 3.2 Television4 References 5 External linksLife and career[edit] Diane Farr was born on September 7, 1969, in New York City, New York.[1] She is of Irish and Italian descent.[2] Farr studied drama at New York's Stony Brook University and Loughborough University
Loughborough University
in England and graduated with a joint B.A. from these two universities.[1] Farr has written two books. The first, The Girl Code, was published in 2001 and has been translated into seven languages
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Catherine Reitman
Catherine Marcelle Reitman (born April 28, 1981) is an American actress and film critic.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Personal life 4 References 5 External linksEarly life[edit] Reitman was born in Los Angeles, California,[1] the daughter of French-Canadian
French-Canadian
actress Geneviève Robert and Slovak-born Canadian film director Ivan Reitman. Her father is from a Jewish family and her mother converted to Judaism.[2] She attended the Cate School
Cate School
and majored in acting at University of Southern California. Career[edit] Reitman starred in the television series The Real Wedding Crashers, based on the hit movie Wedding Crashers. She appeared in the films Knocked Up
Knocked Up
(2007) and I Love You, Man
I Love You, Man
(2009)
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Tyra Banks
Tyra Lynne Banks (born December 4, 1973) is an American television personality, producer, businesswoman, actress, author, former model and occasional singer. Born in Inglewood, California, she began her career as a model at the age of 15, and was the first African-American woman to be featured on the covers of GQ and the Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue, on which she appeared twice. She was a Victoria's Secret Angel from 1997 to 2005. By the early 2000s, Banks was one of the world's top-earning models. Banks began acting on television in 1993 on The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, and made her film debut in Higher Learning
Higher Learning
in 1995. In 2000 she had major roles such as Eve in Disney Channel's Life-Size
Life-Size
and Zoe in the box-office hit Coyote Ugly
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Brown University
Brown University
Brown University
is a private Ivy League
Ivy League
research university in Providence, Rhode Island, United States. Founded in 1764 as the College in the English Colony of Rhode Island
Rhode Island
and Providence Plantations, it is the seventh-oldest institution of higher education in the U.S. and one of the nine colonial colleges chartered before the American Revolution.[7] At its foundation, Brown was the first college in the U.S. to accept students regardless of their religious affiliation.[8] Its engineering program, the first in the Ivy League, was established in 1847. It was one of the early doctoral-granting U.S. institutions in the late 19th century, adding masters and doctoral studies in 1887.[9] Its New Curriculum is sometimes referred to in education theory as the Brown Curriculum and was adopted by faculty vote in 1969 after a period of student lobbying
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Hippie
A hippie (sometimes spelled hippy)[1][2] is a member of a counterculture, originally a youth movement that began in the United States during the mid-1960s and spread to other countries around the world. The word hippie came from hipster and used to describe beatniks who moved into New York City's Greenwich Village
Greenwich Village
and San Francisco's Haight-Ashbury
Haight-Ashbury
district. The term hippie first found popularity in San Francisco by Herb Caen, a journalist for the San Francisco Chronicle. The origins of the terms hip and hep are uncertain. By the 1940s, both had become part of African American jive slang and meant "sophisticated; currently fashionable; fully up-to-date".[3][4][5] The Beats adopted the term hip, and early hippies inherited the language and countercultural values of the Beat Generation
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Recurring Character
A recurring character is a fictional character, usually in a prime time TV series, who often and frequently appears from time to time during the series' run.[1] Recurring characters often play major roles in more than one episode, sometimes being the main focus. Recurring characters usually start out as guest stars in one episode but continue to show up in future episodes if the storylines or actors are compelling enough.[1] Sometimes a recurring character eventually becomes part of the main cast of characters; such a character is sometimes called a breakout character. Some notable examples of main characters who were originally recurring characters are: Eli Gold
Eli Gold
on The Good Wife; Leo Chingkwake on That '70s Show; Angel and Oz on Buffy the Vampire Slayer; Marc St. James
Marc St

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Ensemble Cast
An ensemble cast is made up of cast members in which the principal actors and performers are assigned roughly equal amounts of importance and screen time in a dramatic production.[1][2]Contents1 Structure1.1 Cinema 1.2 Television2 See also 3 ReferencesStructure[edit] The structure of an ensemble cast contrasts with the popular Hollywood centralization of a sole protagonist, as the ensemble leans more towards a sense of "collectivity and community".[3] Ensemble casts in film were introduced as early as September 1916, with D. W
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Emmy Award
An Emmy Award, or simply Emmy, is an American award that recognizes excellence in the television industry, and is the equivalent of an Academy Award (for film), the Tony Award
Tony Award
(for theatre), and the Grammy Award (for music).[1] Because Emmys are given in various sectors of the American television industry, they are presented in different annual ceremonies held throughout the year. The two events that receive the most media coverage are the Primetime Emmy Awards and the Daytime Emmy Awards, which recognize outstanding work in American primetime and daytime entertainment programming, respectively. Other notable Emmy Award ceremonies are those honoring national sports programming, national news and documentary shows, national business and financial reporting, and technological and engineering achievements in television, including the Primetime Engineering Emmy Awards
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Sitcom
A sit-com or sitcom, a portmanteau of the full term "situation comedy", is a genre of comedy centered on a fixed set of characters who carry over from episode to episode. Sitcoms can be contrasted with sketch comedy, where a troupe may use new characters in each sketch, and stand-up comedy, where a comedian tells jokes and stories to an audience. Sitcoms originated in radio, but today are found mostly on television as one of its dominant narrative forms. This form can also include mockumentaries. A situation comedy television program may be recorded in front of a studio audience, depending on the program's production format. The effect of a live studio audience can be imitated or enhanced by the use of a laugh track. During filming productions, the laugh track is usually prerecorded.[1]Contents1 History 2 By country2.1 Australia 2.2 Canada 2.3 India 2.4 Mexico 2.5 New Zealand 2.6 Russia 2.7 United Kingdom 2.8 United States2.8.1 Sitcoms on U.S. radio 2.8.2 Sitcoms on U.S
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Second Audio Program
Second audio program (SAP), also known as secondary audio programming, is an auxiliary audio channel for analog television that can be broadcast or transmitted both over-the-air and by cable television. SAP is part of the multichannel television sound (MTS) standard originally set by the National Television Systems Committee (NTSC) in 1984 in the United States
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High-definition Television
High-definition television (HDTV) is a television system providing an image resolution that is of substantially higher resolution than that of standard-definition television
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16
Sixteen or 16 may refer to:16 (number), the natural number following 15 and preceding 17 one of the years 16 BC, AD 16, 1916, 2016Contents1 Films 2 Music2.1 Albums 2.2 Songs3 People 4 Places 5 Other usesFilms[edit] Pathinaaru
Pathinaaru
or Sixteen, a 2010 Tamil film Sixteen (1943 film), a 1943 Argentine film directed by Carlos Hugo Christensen Sixteen (2013 Indian film), a 2013 Hindi film Sixteen (2013 British film), a 2013 British film by director Rob BrownMusic[edit]The Sixteen, an English choir 16 (band), a sludge metal band Sixteen (Polish band), a Polish bandAlbums[edit]1
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1080p
1080p
1080p
(1920×1080 px; also known as Full HD or FHD and BT.709) is a set of HDTV high-definition video modes characterized by 1080 horizontal lines of vertical resolution;[1] the p stands for progressive scan, i.e. non-interlaced. The term usually assumes a widescreen aspect ratio of 16:9, implying a resolution of 2.1 megapixels. It is often marketed as full HD, to contrast 1080p with 720p
720p
resolution screens. 1080p
1080p
video signals are supported by ATSC standards
ATSC standards
in the United States and DVB standards
DVB standards
in Europe
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