HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Bjelovar
Bjelovar
Bjelovar
(Hungarian: Belovár, German: Bellowar, Kajkavian: Belovar) is a city in central Croatia. It is the administrative centre of Bjelovar- Bilogora
Bilogora
County. At the 2011 census, there were 40,276 inhabitants, of whom 91.25% were Croats.[1] Bjelovar
Bjelovar
was first mentioned in 1413 and only gained importance when a new fort was built there in 1756, at the command of the Habsburg Empress Maria Theresa. The initial role of the city was to defend central Croatia
Croatia
against the Ottoman invasions
[...More...]

"Bjelovar" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Banovina Of Croatia
The Banovina of Croatia
Croatia
or Banate of Croatia
Croatia
(Serbo-Croatian: Banovina Hrvatska, Бановина Хрватска) was an autonomous province (banovina) of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia
Kingdom of Yugoslavia
between 1939 and 1941. It was formed by combining the Sava Banovina
Sava Banovina
and Littoral Banovina, but also with small parts of the Drina, Zeta, and Danube banovinas. Its capital was Zagreb
Zagreb
and it included most of present-day Croatia
Croatia
along with portions of Bosnia and Herzegovina
Bosnia and Herzegovina
and Serbia. It included area of 65,456 km2 and had population of 4,024,601
[...More...]

"Banovina Of Croatia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ban (title)
Ban /ˈbɑːn/ was a noble title used in several states in Central and Southeastern Europe between the 7th century and the 20th century. In English, common term for the province governed by ban is banate and term for the office of ban is banship.Contents1 Origin of the title1.1 Etymology 1.2 Research history2 Uses of the title2.1 Medieval bans 2.2 Habsburg-era Croatia 2.3 Kingdom of Yugoslavia3 Legacy 4 See also 5 Annotations 6 References6.1 Notes 6.2 Sources7 External linksOrigin of the title[edit] The first known mention of the title ban is in the 10th century by Constantine VII
Constantine VII
Porphyrogenitus, in the work De Administrando Imperio, in the 30th and 31st chapter "Story of the province of Dalmatia" and "Of the Croats
Croats
and of the country they now dwell in", dedicated to the Croats
Croats
and the Croatian organisation of their medieval state
[...More...]

"Ban (title)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hungarian Language
Hungarian ( magyar nyelv (help·info)) is a Finno-Ugric language spoken in Hungary
Hungary
and several neighbouring countries. It is the official language of Hungary
Hungary
and one of the 24 official languages of the European Union. Outside Hungary
Hungary
it is also spoken by communities of Hungarians
Hungarians
in the countries that today make up Slovakia, western Ukraine, central and western Romania
Romania
(Transylvania and Partium), northern Serbia
Serbia
(Vojvodina), southern Poland[citation needed], northern Croatia, and northern Slovenia
Slovenia
due to the effects of the Treaty of Trianon, which resulted in many ethnic Hungarians
Hungarians
being displaced from their homes and communities in the former territories of the Austro-Hungarian Empire
[...More...]

"Hungarian Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

German Language
No official regulation ( German orthography
German orthography
regulated by the Council for German Orthography[4]). Language
Language
codesISO 639-1 deISO 639-2 ger (B) deu (T)ISO 639-3 Variously: deu – German gmh&#
[...More...]

"German Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
[...More...]

"Geographic Coordinate System" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Croats
Croats
Croats
(/ˈkroʊæt, ˈkroʊɑːt/; Croatian: Hrvati, pronounced [xr̩ʋăːti]) are a nation and South Slavic ethnic group native to Croatia. Croats
Croats
mainly live in Croatia
Croatia
and Bosnia and Herzegovina, but are an officially recognized minority in Austria, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, Italy, Montenegro, Romania, Serbia, Slovenia, and Slovakia. Responding to political, social and economic pressure, many Croats
Croats
have migrated throughout Europe (especially Germany, Austria, Switzerland, France
France
and Italy) and the Americas (particularly the United States, Canada, Argentina, and Chile), establishing a diaspora.[40][41] Croats
Croats
are mostly Roman Catholics
[...More...]

"Croats" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Habsburg Monarchy
The Habsburg Monarchy
Monarchy
(German: Habsburgermonarchie) or Empire is an unofficial appellation among historians for the countries and provinces that were ruled by the junior Austrian branch of the House of Habsburg between 1521 and 1780 and then by the successor branch of Habsburg-Lorraine
Habsburg-Lorraine
until 1918. The Monarchy
Monarchy
was a composite state composed of territories within and outside the Holy Roman Empire, united only in the person of the monarch. The dynastic capital was Vienna, except from 1583 to 1611,[2] when it was moved to Prague
[...More...]

"Habsburg Monarchy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Maria Theresa
Maria Theresa
Maria Theresa
Walburga Amalia Christina[1] (German: Maria Theresia [maˈʁiːa teˈʁeːzi̯a]; 13 May 1717 – 29 November 1780) was the only female ruler of the Habsburg
Habsburg
dominions and the last of the House of Habsburg. She was the sovereign of Austria, Hungary, Croatia, Bohemia, Transylvania, Mantua, Milan, Lodomeria and Galicia, the Austrian Netherlands
Austrian Netherlands
and Parma. By marriage, she was Duchess of Lorraine, Grand Duchess of Tuscany
Grand Duchess of Tuscany
and Holy Roman Empress.[2] She started her 40-year reign when her father, Emperor Charles VI, died in October 1740
[...More...]

"Maria Theresa" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ottoman Empire
The Ottoman Empire (/ˈɒtəmən/; Devlet-i ʿAlīye-i ʿOsmānīye[dn 5]), also historically known in Western Europe
Europe
as the Turkish Empire[8] or simply Turkey,[9] was a state that controlled much of southeastern Europe, western Asia and northern Africa between the 14th and early 20th centuries. It was founded at the end of the 13th century in northwestern Anatolia
Anatolia
in the town of Söğüt (modern-day Bilecik Province) by the Oghuz Turkish tribal leader Osman.[10] After 1354, the Ottomans crossed into Europe, and with the conquest of the Balkans, the Ottoman Beylik was transformed into a transcontinental empire
[...More...]

"Ottoman Empire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Ivan Mazuranic
Ivan Mažuranić (pronounced [ǐv̞an maʒǔranitɕ]; 11 August 1814 – 4 August 1890) was a Croatian poet, linguist, lawyer and politician who is considered to be one of the most important figures in Croatia's political and cultural life in the mid-19th century. Mažuranić served as Ban of Kingdom of Croatia-Slavonia between 1873 and 1880, and since he was the first ban not to hail from old nobility, he was known as Ban pučanin (Ban commoner). His realistic assessment of strengths and weaknesses of Croatia's position between the hammer of Austrian bureaucracy and the anvil of Hungarian expansionist nationalism served his country invaluable in times of political turmoil
[...More...]

"Ivan Mazuranic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Köppen Climate Classification
Köppen climate classification
Köppen climate classification
is one of the most widely used climate classification systems. It was first published by Russian German climatologist Wladimir Köppen
Wladimir Köppen
in 1884,[2][3] with several later modifications by Köppen, notably in 1918 and 1936.[4][5] Later, German climatologist Rudolf Geiger (1954, 1961) collaborated with Köppen on changes to the classification system, which is thus sometimes called the Köppen–Geiger climate classification system.[6][7] The Köppen climate classification
Köppen climate classification
system has been further modified, within the Trewartha climate classification
Trewartha climate classification
system in the middle 1960s (revised in 1980)
[...More...]

"Köppen Climate Classification" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Neolithic
farming, animal husbandry pottery, metallurgy, wheel circular ditches, henges, megaliths Neolithic
Neolithic
religion↓ ChalcolithicThe Neolithic
Neolithic
(/ˌniːəˈlɪθɪk/ ( listen)[1]) was a period in the development of human technology, beginning about 10,200 BC, according to the ASPRO chronology, in some parts of the Middle East, and later in other parts of the world[2] and ending between 4500 and 2000 BC. Traditionally considered the last part of the Stone Age
Stone Age
or The New Stone Age, the Neolithic
Neolithic
followed the terminal Holocene
Holocene
Epipaleolithic period and commenced with the beginning of farming, which produced the " Neolithic
Neolithic
Revolution"
[...More...]

"Neolithic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Sopot Culture
The Sopot culture is a neolithic archaeological culture in eastern Slavonia in modern day Croatia. It was a continuation of the Starčevo culture and strongly influenced by the Vinča culture (Samatovci, Sopot, Otok, Privlaka, Vinkovci–Ervenica, Osijek, Bapska, Županja, Klokočevik). It spread into northern Bosnia from its original area to the west to northwestern Croatia and to the north to Hungarian Transdubia, where it helped Lengyel culture start. The culture dates to around 5000 BC. Settlements were raised on the river banks (most noticeably on the banks of Bosut, around the area of the modern city of Vinkovci). Houses were square and made of wood using interlace technique, sometimes separated into multiple rooms
[...More...]

"Sopot Culture" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Vučedol Culture
The Vučedol culture
Vučedol culture
(Serbo-Croatian: Vučedolska kultura) flourished between 3000 and 2200 BC[1] (the Eneolithic
Eneolithic
period of earliest copper-smithing), centered in Syrmia
Syrmia
and eastern Slavonia
Slavonia
on the right bank of the Danube
Danube
river, but possibly spreading throughout the Pannonian plain
Pannonian plain
and western Balkans
Balkans
and southward
[...More...]

"Vučedol Culture" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Austrian Monarchy
The Habsburg Monarchy
Monarchy
(German: Habsburgermonarchie) or Empire is an unofficial appellation among historians for the countries and provinces that were ruled by the junior Austrian branch of the House of Habsburg between 1521 and 1780 and then by the successor branch of Habsburg-Lorraine
Habsburg-Lorraine
until 1918. The Monarchy
Monarchy
was a composite state composed of territories within and outside the Holy Roman Empire, united only in the person of the monarch. The dynastic capital was Vienna, except from 1583 to 1611,[2] when it was moved to Prague
[...More...]

"Austrian Monarchy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.