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Bishop Of Beauvais-Noyons-Senlis
The Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
Diocese
Diocese
of Beauvais, Noyon, and Senlis
Senlis
(Latin: Dioecesis Bellovacensis, Noviomensis et Silvanectensis; French: Diocèse de Beauvais, Noyon
Noyon
et Senlis) is a diocese of the Latin
Latin
Rite of the Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
Church in France. The diocese encompasses the department of Oise
Oise
in the region of Hauts-de-France. The diocese is a suffragan of the Archdiocese of Reims
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Beauvais Cathedral
The Cathedral
Cathedral
of Saint Peter of Beauvais
Beauvais
(French: Cathédrale Saint-Pierre de Beauvais) is a Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
church in the northern town of Beauvais, France. It is the seat of the Bishop of Beauvais, Noyon, and Senlis. Construction was begun in the 13th-century. The cathedral is of the Gothic style
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Battle Of Agincourt
The Battle of Agincourt
Battle of Agincourt
(/ˈæʒɪnkʊr/; in French, Azincourt; French pronunciation: ​[azɛ̃kuʁ])[a] was a major English victory in the Hundred Years' War. The battle took place on 25 October 1415 (Saint Crispin's Day) in the County of Saint-Pol, Artois, some 40 km south of Calais
Calais
(now Azincourt
Azincourt
in northern France).[6][b] Along with the battles of Crécy (1346) and Poitiers (1356), it was one of the most important English triumphs in the conflict
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Ivo Of Chartres
Saint
Saint
Ivo of Chartres
Chartres
(also Ives, Yves, or Yvo; Latin: Ivo Carnutensis; c. 1040 – 23 December 1115) was the Bishop of Chartres, France
France
from 1090 until his death, and an important canonist during the Investiture Crisis. Ivo is claimed to have studied at the Abbey of Bec
Abbey of Bec
in Normandy
Normandy
under Lanfranc
Lanfranc
of Canterbury, where he would have met St. Anselm of Canterbury, the great scholastic theologian. In 1067 or not much later, he became, at the desire of his bishop, prior of the canons of Saint-Quentin at Beauvais
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Philip I Of France
Philip I (23 May 1052 – 29 July 1108), called the Amorous,[1] was King of the Franks from 1060 to his death. His reign, like that of most of the early Capetians, was extraordinarily long for the time. The monarchy began a modest recovery from the low it reached in the reign of his father and he added to the royal demesne the Vexin[2] and Bourges.Contents1 Biography 2 Issue 3 Ancestry 4 References 5 SourcesBiography[edit] Philip was born 23 May 1052 at Champagne-et-Fontaine, the son of Henry I and his wife Anne of Kiev.[3] Unusually for the time in Western Europe, his name was of Greek origin, being bestowed upon him by his mother. Although he was crowned king at the age of seven,[4] until age fourteen (1066) his mother acted as regent, the first queen of France ever to do so. Baldwin V of Flanders also acted as co-regent.[2] Following the death of Baldwin VI of Flanders, Robert the Frisian seized Flanders
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Pope Paschal II
Pope
Pope
Paschal II (Latin: Paschalis II; 1050 x 1055 – 21 January 1118), born Ranierius, was Pope
Pope
from 13 August 1099 to his death in 1118. A monk of the Cluniac order, he created the Cardinal-Priest of San Clemente by Pope Gregory VII
Pope Gregory VII
(1073–85) in 1073. He was consecrated as pope in succession to Pope Urban II
Pope Urban II
(1088–99) on 19 August 1099. His reign of almost twenty years was exceptionally long for a pope of the Middle Ages.Contents1 Biography1.1 Early life and papacy2 Actions during his reign 3 See also 4 Notes 5 ReferencesBiography[edit] Early life and papacy[edit] He was born in Bleda, near Forlì, Romagna. During the long struggle of the papacy with the Holy Roman Emperors over investiture, he zealously carried on the Hildebrandine policy in favor of papal privilege, but with only partial success
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Charles The Bald
Charles the Bald
Charles the Bald
(13 June 823 – 6 October 877) was the King of West Francia
Francia
(843–877), King of Italy
King of Italy
(875–877) and Holy Roman Emperor (875–877, as Charles II). After a series of civil wars during the reign of his father, Louis the Pious, Charles succeeded by the Treaty of Verdun
Treaty of Verdun
(843) in acquiring the western third of the Carolingian
Carolingian
Empire
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Cuno Of Praeneste
Cuno of Praeneste[1] (died 9 August 1122) was a German Cardinal and papal legate, an influential diplomatic figure of the early 12th century, active in France and Germany. According to the Chronicon of Pietro di Monte Cassino, in 1112 he pronounced the Emperor Henry V excommunicated and stripped of his power, at a Council in Jerusalem.[2] From the previous year, Cuno had been trying to lay down papal policy, and this move was without the Pope's agreement.[3] In 1115 he was in France, summoning synods at Reims and Beauvais; he again excommunicated Henry V. He also suspended all the bishops and abbots of Normandy, for ignoring his invitations.[4] Subsequently he worked with Thurstan, Archbishop of York to broker peace between Henry I of England and Louis VI of France.[5] He then moved to Germany, stirring up trouble against the Emperor
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Henry V, Holy Roman Emperor
Henry V (German: Heinrich V.; 11 August 1081/86[1] – 23 May 1125) was King of Germany
King of Germany
(from 1099 to 1125) and Holy Roman Emperor
Holy Roman Emperor
(from 1111 to 1125), the fourth and last ruler of the Salian
Salian
dynasty. Henry's reign coincided with the final phase of the great Investiture Controversy, which had pitted pope against emperor. By the settlement of the Concordat of Worms, he surrendered to the demands of the second generation of Gregorian reformers.Contents1 Assumption of power 2 First Italian expedition 3 Return to Germany3.1 War with Cologne4 Second Italian expedition 5 Concordat of Worms 6 Death 7 Ancestry 8 See also 9 References 10 SourcesAssumption of power[edit] Henry's parents were Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor, and Bertha of Savoy
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Louis VII Of France
Louis VII (called the Younger or the Young; French: Louis le Jeune; 1120 – 18 September 1180) was King of the Franks from 1137 until his death. He was the son and successor of King Louis VI of France, hence his nickname, and married Eleanor of Aquitaine, one of the wealthiest and most powerful women in western Europe. Eleanor came with the vast Duchy of Aquitaine
Duchy of Aquitaine
as a dowry for Louis, thus temporarily extending the Capetian lands to the Pyrenees, but their marriage was annulled in 1152 after no male heir was produced. Immediately after the annulment of her marriage, Eleanor married Henry Plantagenet, Duke of Normandy
Duke of Normandy
and Count of Anjou, to whom she conveyed Aquitaine
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Pope Alexander III
Pope
Pope
Alexander III (c. 1100/1105 – 30 August 1181), born Roland of Siena,[1] was Pope
Pope
from 7 September 1159 to his death in 1181. Through the Papal bull
Papal bull
Manifestis Probatum, issued on 23 May 1179, he recognized the right of Afonso I to proclaim himself King of Portugal, thus recognizing Portugal
Portugal
as an independent and sovereign Kingdom.[2] He also laid the foundation stone for the Notre-Dame de Paris.Contents1 Early life and career 2 Disputed election 3 Alexander's politics 4 Efforts at reform 5 Notes 6 ReferencesEarly life and career[edit] Pope
Pope
Alexander III was born in Siena
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Hundred Years' War
House of Valois Kingdom of France Duchy of Burgundy[1] Duchy of Brittany[2] (County of Flanders)*[3] Kingdom of Scotland Kingdom of Bohemia Duchy of Lorraine Republic of Genoa Crown of Castile Crown of Aragon Kingdom of Majorca Avignon Papacy[4] House of Plantagenet Kingdom of England Principality of Wales Duchy of Aquitaine English Kingdom of France[5] Duchy of Burgundy County of Flanders County of Hainaut Duchy of Brittany[6] Kingdom of Portugal Kingdom of Navarre Papal States[7]Commanders and leaders Philip VI (1337–1350) John II (1350–1364) Charles V (1364–1380) Charles VI (1380–1422) Charles VII (1422–1453) Edward III
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Hundred Years' War (1415–1453)
French victoryEnd of the Hundred Years' WarBelligerents Kingdom of France Duchy of Brittany[1] Kingdom of Scotland Kingdom of England • Principality of Wales • English Kingdom of France Duchy of BurgundyCommanders and leaders Charles VI # Charles VII Joan of Arc  Arthur de Richemont Jean de Dunois La Hire
La Hire
# Jean de Xaintrailles Jean d'Alençon <
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Philip The Good
Philip the Good
Philip the Good
(French: Philippe le Bon, Dutch: Filips de Goede; 31 July 1396 – 15 June 1467) was Duke of Burgundy
Duke of Burgundy
as Philip III from 1419 until his death. He was a member of a cadet line of the Valois dynasty, to which all the 15th-century kings of France belonged. During his reign, Burgundy reached the apex of its prosperity and prestige and became a leading center of the arts. Philip is known in history for his administrative reforms, his patronage of Flemish artists such as Jan van Eyck
Jan van Eyck
and Franco-Flemish composers such as Gilles Binchois, and the capture of Joan of Arc. In political affairs, he alternated between alliances with the English and the French in an attempt to improve his dynasty's position
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Pierre Cauchon
Pierre Cauchon
Pierre Cauchon
(1371 in Rheims
Rheims
– 18 December 1442 in Rouen) was Bishop of Beauvais
Bishop of Beauvais
from 1420 to 1432. A strong partisan of English interests in France during the latter years of the Hundred Years' War, his role in arranging the execution of Joan of Arc
Joan of Arc
led most subsequent observers to condemn his extension of secular politics into an ecclesiastical trial. The Catholic Church
Catholic Church
overturned his verdict in 1455.Contents1 Background 2 Early career 3 The choice of the Burgundian party 4 Alliance with the English 5 The trial of Joan of Arc 6 New appointment 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksBackground[edit] Cauchon came from a middle-class family in Rheims. He entered the clergy as a teenager and went to Paris, where he studied at the University of Paris
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Calixtus III
Pope
Pope
Callixtus III (31 December 1378 – 6 August 1458), born Alfons de Borja, was head of the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
and ruler of the Papal States from 8 April 1455 to his death in 1458. He is the most recent pope to have taken the pontifical name of "Callixtus" upon his election. He was also responsible for the retrial of Joan of Arc
Joan of Arc
that saw her vindicated
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