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Birute Galdikas
Birutė Marija Filomena Galdikas, OC (born 10 May 1946), is a Lithuanian-Canadian[1] anthropologist, primatologist, conservationist, ethologist, and author. She is currently a Professor at Simon Fraser University. Well known in the field of primatology, Galdikas is recognized as a leading authority on orangutans.[2] Prior to her field study of orangutans, scientists knew little about the species.[3]Contents1 Early life 2 The Trimates 3 Research and advocacy 4 Legacy 5 Recognition 6 Controversy 7 Film and television 8 See also 9 References 10 Further reading 11 External linksEarly life[edit] Galdikas was born on 10 May 1946 in Wiesbaden, Germany. Her parents, Antanas and Filomena Galdikas, were Lithuanian refugees fleeing the Soviet occupation of the Baltic states following World War II. When Galdikas was two years old, the family moved to Canada when her father signed a contract to work in copper mining in Quebec
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Order Of Canada
This audio file was created from a revision of the article "Order of Canada" dated 2012-01-21, and does not reflect subsequent edits to the article. (Audio help) More spoken articlesThe Order of Canada
Canada
(French: Ordre du Canada) is a Canadian national order, admission into which is the second highest honour for merit in the system of orders, decorations, and medals of Canada. It comes second only to membership in the Order of Merit, which is the personal gift of Canada's monarch. To coincide with the centennial of Canadian Confederation, the three-tiered order was established in 1967 as a fellowship that recognizes the outstanding merit or distinguished service of Canadians who make a major difference to Canada
Canada
through lifelong contributions in every field of endeavour, as well as the efforts by non-Canadians who have made the world better by their actions
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Mountain Gorillas
The mountain gorilla ( Gorilla
Gorilla
beringei beringei) is one of the two subspecies of the eastern gorilla. There are two populations. One is found in the Virunga volcanic mountains of Central Africa, within three National Parks: Mgahinga, in south-west Uganda; Volcanoes, in north-west Rwanda; and Virunga in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). It is listed as critically endangered by the IUCN. The other is found in Uganda's Bwindi Impenetrable National Park. Some primatologists speculate the Bwindi population in Uganda
Uganda
is a separate subspecies,[3] though no description has been finalized
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Zoology
Zoology
Zoology
(/zuːˈɒlədʒi, zoʊˈɒlədʒi/) or animal biology is the branch of biology that studies the animal kingdom, including the structure, embryology, evolution, classification, habits, and distribution of all animals, both living and extinct, and how they interact with their ecosystems. The term is derived from Ancient
Ancient
Greek ζῷον, zōion, i.e. "animal" and λόγος, logos, i.e. "knowledge, study".[1]Contents1 History1.1 Ancient
Ancient
history to Darwin 1.2 Post-Darwin2 Research2.1 Structural 2.2 Physiological 2.3 Evolutionary 2.4 Classification 2.5 Ethology 2.6 Biogeography3 Branches of zoology 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] Ancient
Ancient
history to Darwin[edit] Conrad Gesner
Conrad Gesner
(1516–1565)
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University Of British Columbia
Coordinates: 49°15′40″N 123°15′11″W / 49.26111°N 123.25306°W / 49.26111; -123.25306University of British ColumbiaUniversity of British Columbia
British Columbia
coat of armsMotto Latin: Tuum EstMotto in EnglishIt is yours It is up to youEstablished 1908Endowment USD$1.142 billion (2016)[1]Budget CAD$2.1 billion[2]Chancellor Lindsay GordonPresident Santa J
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Borneo
Borneo
Borneo
(/ˈbɔːrnioʊ/; Malay: Pulau Borneo, Indonesian: Kalimantan) is the third-largest island in the world and the largest in Asia.[note 1] At the geographic centre of Maritime Southeast Asia, in relation to major Indonesian islands, it is located north of Java, west of Sulawesi, and east of Sumatra. The island is politically divided among three countries: Malaysia
Malaysia
and Brunei
Brunei
in the north, and Indonesia
Indonesia
to the south.[1] Approximately 73% of the island is Indonesian territory. In the north, the East Malaysian states of Sabah
Sabah
and Sarawak
Sarawak
make up about 26% of the island. Additionally, the Malaysian federal territory of Labuan
Labuan
is situated on a small island just off the coast of Borneo
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Great Ape
The Hominidae
Hominidae
(/hɒˈmɪnɪdiː/), whose members are known as great apes[note 1] or hominids, are a taxonomic family of primates that includes eight extant species in four genera: Pongo, the Bornean, Sumatran and Tapanuli orangutan; Gorilla, the eastern and western gorilla; Pan, the common chimpanzee and the bonobo; and Homo, which includes modern humans and its extinct relatives (e.g., the Neanderthal), and ancestors, such as Homo
Homo
erectus.[1] Several revisions in classifying the great apes have caused the use of the term "hominid" to vary over time. Its original meaning referred only to humans (Homo) and their closest extinct relatives. That restrictive meaning has now been largely assumed by the term "hominin", which comprises all members of the human clade after the split from the chimpanzees (Pan). The current, 21st-century meaning of "hominid" includes all the great apes including humans
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Indonesia
Coordinates: 5°S 120°E / 5°S 120°E / -5; 120 Republic
Republic
of Indonesia Republik Indonesia  (Indonesian)FlagNational emblemMotto:  Bhinneka Tunggal Ika
Bhinneka Tunggal

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Malaysia
Coordinates: 2°30′N 112°30′E / 2.500°N 112.500°E / 2.500; 112.500MalaysiaFlagCoat of armsMotto: "Bersekutu Bertambah Mutu"[1] "Unity Is Strength"Anthem: Negaraku My CountryCapital Kuala Lumpur 3°8′N 101°41′E / 3.133°N 101.683°E / 3.133; 101.683 Putrajaya
Putrajaya
(administrative) 2°56′35″N 101°41′58″E / 2.9430952°N 101.699373°E / 2.9430952; 101.699373Largest city Kuala Lumpur 3°8′N 101°41′E / 3.133°N 101.683°E / 3.133; 101.683Official languages Malay[2]Official script MalayRecognis
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Jane Goodall
Dame Jane Morris Goodall DBE (/ˈɡʊdˌɔːl/; born Valerie Jane Morris-Goodall, 3 April 1934),[2] formerly Baroness Jane van Lawick-Goodall, is a British primatologist and anthropologist.[3] Considered to be the world's foremost expert on chimpanzees, Goodall is best known for her over 55-year study of social and family interactions of wild chimpanzees since she first went to Gombe Stream National Park, Tanzania
Tanzania
in 1960.[4] She is the founder of the Jane Goodall Institute and the Roots & Shoots programme, and she has worked extensively on conservation and animal welfare issues
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Chimpanzees
Pan troglodytes Pan paniscusDistribution of Pan troglodytes
Pan troglodytes
(common chimpanzee) and Pan paniscus (bonobo, in red)SynonymsTroglodytes E. Geoffroy, 1812 (preoccupied) Mimetes Leach, 1820 (preoccupied) Theranthropus Brookes, 1828 Chimpansee Voight, 1831 Anthropopithecus Blainville, 1839[2] Hylanthropus Gloger, 1841 Pseudanthropus Reichenbach, 1862 Engeco Haeckel, 1866 Fsihego DePauw, 1905The taxonomical genus Pan (often referred to as chimpanzees or chimps) consists of two extant species: the common chimpanzee and the bonobo. Together with humans, gorillas, and orangutans they are part of the family Hominidae
Hominidae
(the great apes). Native to sub-Saharan Africa, common chimpanzees and bonobos are currently both found in the Congo jungle, while only the common chimpanzee is also found further north in West Africa
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Dian Fossey
Dian Fossey
Dian Fossey
(/daɪˈæn ˈfɒsi/; January 16, 1932 – c. December 26, 1985) was an American primatologist and conservationist known for undertaking an extensive study of mountain gorilla groups from 1966 until her death in 1985. She studied them daily in the mountain forests of Rwanda, initially encouraged to work there by paleontologist Louis Leakey. Her 1983 book, Gorillas in the Mist, combines her scientific study of the gorillas at Karisoke
Karisoke
Research Center with her own personal story. It was adapted into a 1988 film of the same name.[1] Called one of the foremost primatologists in the world, Fossey, along with Jane Goodall
Jane Goodall
and Birutė Galdikas, were the so-called Trimates, a group of three prominent researchers on primates (Fossey on gorillas; Goodall on common chimpanzees; and Galdikas on orangutans)
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Jungle
A jungle is land covered with dense vegetation dominated by trees. Application of the term has varied greatly during the past recent centuries. Prior to the 1970s, tropical rainforests were generally referred to as jungles but this terminology has fallen out of usage. Jungles in Western literature can represent a less civilised or unruly space outside the control of civilisation: attributed to the jungle's association in colonial discourse with places colonised by Europeans.Contents1 Etymology 2 Wildlife 3 Varying usage3.1 As dense and impenetrable vegetation 3.2 As moist forest 3.3 As metaphor4 See also 5 References 6 External linksEtymology[edit] The word jungle originates from the Sanskrit
Sanskrit
word Jangla (Sanskrit: जङ्गल), meaning uncultivated land
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Wiesbaden
Wiesbaden
Wiesbaden
(German pronunciation: [ˈviːsˌbaːdn̩] ( listen)) is a city in central western Germany
Germany
and the capital of the federal state of Hesse. In January 2018, it had 289,544 inhabitants,[2] plus approximately 19,000[3] United States citizens (mostly associated with the United States Army). The Wiesbaden
Wiesbaden
urban area is home to approx. 560,000 people. The city, together with nearby Frankfurt
Frankfurt
am Main, Darmstadt, and Mainz, is part of the Frankfurt
Frankfurt
Rhine
Rhine
Main Region, a metropolitan area with a combined population of about 5.8 million people. Wiesbaden
Wiesbaden
is one of the oldest spa towns in Europe. Its name translates to "meadow baths", a reference to the hot springs
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Biodiversity
Biodiversity, a portmanteau of "bio" (life) and "diversity", generally refers to the variety and variability of life on Earth. According to the United Nations Environment Programme
United Nations Environment Programme
(UNEP), biodiversity typically measures variation at the genetic, the species, and the ecosystem level.[1] Terrestrial biodiversity tends to be greater near the equator,[2] which seems to be the result of the warm climate and high primary productivity.[3] Biodiversity
Biodiversity
is not distributed evenly on Earth, and is richest in the tropics
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Rainforest
Rainforests are forests characterized by high rainfall, with annual rainfall in the case of tropical rainforests between 250 and 450 centimetres (98 and 177 in),[1] and definitions varying by region for temperate rainforests
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