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Birmingham Post
The Birmingham
Birmingham
Post is a weekly printed newspaper based in Birmingham, England, with a circulation of 6,667 [2] and distribution throughout the West Midlands. First published under the name the Birmingham
Birmingham
Daily Post in 1857, it has had a succession of distinguished editors and has played an influential role in the life and politics of the city. It is currently owned by Trinity Mirror. In June 2013, it launched a daily tablet edition called Birmingham
Birmingham
Post Business Daily.Contents1 History1.1 Radical politics 1.2 Leading regional paper 1.3 Conservative paper 1.4 Birmingham's business paper2 Editors 3 References 4 Further reading 5 External linksHistory[edit] The Birmingham
Birmingham
Journal was a weekly newspaper published between 1825 and 1869
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Conservative Party (UK)
The Conservative Party, officially the Conservative and Unionist Party,[11] is a centre-right political party in the United Kingdom. It is currently the governing party, having been so since the 2010 general election, where a coalition government with the Liberal Democrats was formed. In 2015, the Conservatives led by David Cameron won a surprise majority and formed the first Conservative majority government since 1992.[12] However, the 2017 snap election on Thursday 8 June resulted in a hung parliament, and the party lost its parliamentary majority.[13] It is reliant on the support of a Northern Irish political party, the Democratic Unionist Party
Democratic Unionist Party
(DUP), in order to command a majority in the House of Commons through a confidence-and-supply deal. The party leader, Theresa May,[14] has served as both Leader of the Conservative Party and Prime Minister since 13 July 2016
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George Dawson (preacher)
George Dawson (24 February 1821 – 30 November 1876) was an English nonconformist preacher, lecturer and activist. He was an influential voice in the calls for radical political and social reform in Birmingham, a philosophy that became known as the Civic Gospel.Contents1 Ministry1.1 Civic Gospel2 Views 3 Other interests 4 Personal life 5 Biography 6 Commemoration 7 References 8 BibliographyMinistry[edit]An engraving of Dawson, c.1852Dawson was born in Brunswick Square, London, in 1821. His father was headmaster of a Baptist school. He was educated at home, then at Marischal College, Aberdeen, and the University of Glasgow. Oxford and Cambridge were not an option as Nonconformists were banned from these universities. In 1843 Dawson accepted a call to the pastorate of the Baptist church at Rickmansworth
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Sunday Mirror
Sunday
Sunday
is the day of the week after Saturday
Saturday
but before Monday. Sunday is a day of rest in most Western countries, as a part of the weekend. For most observant Christians, Sunday
Sunday
is observed as a day of worship and rest, holding it as the Lord's Day
Lord's Day
and the day of Christ's resurrection. In some Muslim countries
Muslim countries
and Israel,[citation needed] Sunday
Sunday
is the first work day of the week
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Member Of Parliament
A member of parliament (MP) is the representative of the voters to a parliament. In many countries with bicameral parliaments, this category includes specifically members of the lower house, as upper houses often have a different title
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Newspaper
A newspaper is a periodical publication containing written information about current events. Newspapers
Newspapers
can cover wide variety of fields such as politics, business, sport and art and often include materials such as opinion columns, weather forecasts, reviews of local services, obituaries, birth notices, crosswords, editorial cartoons, comic strips, and advice columns. Most newspapers are businesses, and they pay their expenses with a mixture of subscription revenue, newsstand sales, and advertising revenue. The journalism organizations that publish newspapers are themselves often metonymically called newspapers. Newspapers
Newspapers
have traditionally been published in print (usually on cheap, low-grade paper called newsprint)
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First World War
Allied victoryCentral Powers' victory on the Eastern Front nullified by defeat on the Western Front Fall of the German, Russian, Ottoman, and Austro-Hungarian empires Russian Civil War
Russian Civil War
and foundation of the Soviet Union Formation of new countries in Europe
Europe
and the Middle East Transfer of German colonies
German colonies
and regions of the former Ottoman Empire to other powers Establishment of the League of Nations
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Robert William Dale
Robert William Dale (1 December 1829 – 13 March 1895) was an English Congregational church leader.Contents1 Life 2 Views and publications 3 The "Civic Gospel" and politics 4 Work in education 5 Later years 6 Death and commemoration 7 Notes 8 ReferencesLife[edit]Blue plaque on the modern Carrs Lane Church, BirminghamDale was born in London and educated at Spring Hill College, Birmingham, for the Congregational ministry. In 1853 he was invited to Carr's Lane Chapel, Birmingham, as co-pastor with John Angell James, on whose death in 1859 he became sole pastor for the rest of his life. In the University of London M.A. examination (1853), he came first in philosophy and won the gold medal. The degree of LL.D. was conferred upon him in 1883 by the University of Glasgow during the lord rectorship of John Bright. Yale University gave him its D.D. degree, although he never used it
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John Bright (parliamentarian)
Sir John Bright, 1st Baronet (14 October 1619 – 13 October 1688) was an English parliamentarian, of Carbrook and Badsworth, Yorkshire.Contents1 Birth and family 2 Military career 3 Life after the military 4 Marriages 5 Death 6 ReferencesBirth and family[edit] John Bright was born in 1619, the third, but only surviving, son of Stephen Bright and Joan Westby. Military career[edit]Pamphlet held by Wakefield Libraries Local Studies collectionBright took up arms for the parliament at the outbreak of the civil war. He raised several companies in the neighbourhood of Sheffield, and received a captain's commission from Lord Fairfax, still aged only twenty-one. Bright was named one of the sequestration commissioners for the West Riding (1 April 1643). About the same date he became a colonel of foot
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Civic Gospel
The Civic Gospel was a philosophy of municipal activism and improvement that emerged in Birmingham, England in the mid-19th century. Tracing its origins to the teaching of independent nonconformist preacher George Dawson,[1] who declared that "a town is a solemn organism through which shall flow, and in which shall be shaped, all the highest, loftiest and truest ends of man's moral nature",[2] it reached its culmination in the mayoralty of Joseph Chamberlain between 1873 and 1876.[3] After Dawson's death in 1876 it was the Congregationalist pastor R. W. Dale who took on the role as the movement's leading nonconformist spokesman.[4] Other major proponents included the Baptist Charles Vince and the Unitarian H
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Joseph Chamberlain
Joseph Chamberlain
Joseph Chamberlain
(8 July 1836 – 2 July 1914) was a British statesman who was first a radical Liberal, then, after opposing home rule for Ireland, a Liberal Unionist, and eventually served as a leading imperialist in coalition with the Conservatives. He split both major British parties in the course of his career. Chamberlain made his career in Birmingham, first as a manufacturer of screws and then as a notable mayor of the city. He was a radical Liberal Party member and an opponent of the Elementary Education Act 1870. As a self-made businessman, he had never attended university and had contempt for the aristocracy. He entered the House of Commons at 39 years of age, relatively late in life compared to politicians from more privileged backgrounds. Rising to power through his influence with the Liberal grassroots organisation, he served as President of the Board of Trade in Gladstone's Second Government (1880–85)
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Sunday Mercury
Mercury
Mercury
usually refers to: Mercury
Mercury
(element), a metallic chemical element (symbol: Hg)
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Airdrie & Coatbridge Advertiser
Coatbridge
Coatbridge
(Scots: Cotbrig or Coatbrig, Scottish Gaelic: Drochaid a' Chòta) is a town in North Lanarkshire, Scotland, about 8.5 miles (13.7 km) east of Glasgow
Glasgow
city centre, set in the central Lowlands. The town, with neighbouring Airdrie, is part of the Greater Glasgow
Glasgow
urban area. While the earliest known settlement of the area dates back to the Stone Age
Stone Age
era, the founding of the town can be traced to the 12th century, when a Royal Charter
Royal Charter
was granted to the monks of Newbattle Abbey
Newbattle Abbey
by King Malcolm IV. Coatbridge, along with its neighbour Airdrie, forms the area known as the Monklands. In the last years of the 18th century, the area developed from a loose collection of hamlets into the town of Coatbridge
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British Newspaper Archive
The British Newspaper
Newspaper
Archive web site provides access to searchable digitised archives of British newspapers. It was launched in November 2011.Contents1 History1.1 Digitisation2 Subscription costs 3 Reception 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit]British Library Newspapers, ColindaleThe British Library Newspapers section was based in Colindale
Colindale
in North London, until 2013,[1] and is now divided between the St Pancras and Boston Spa
Boston Spa
sites.[2] The Library has an almost complete collection of British and Irish newspapers since 1840. This is partly because of the legal deposit legislation of 1869, which required newspapers to supply a copy of each edition of a newspaper to the library. London editions of national daily and Sunday newspapers are complete back to 1801
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Geoffrey Eley
Sir Geoffrey Cecil Ryves Eley CBE JP FLS (18 July 1904 – 17 May 1990) was a British businessman and author. He served as a director of the Bank of England, and as High Sheriff of both the County of London and the City of London. Biography[edit] Eley was born in East Bergholt, Suffolk, one of four sons born to Charles Cuthbert Eley, a barrister and noted gardener, and Ethel Maxwell Ryves. His great-grandfather William Eley co-founded the Eley Brothers
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Free Market
In economics, a free market is an idealized system in which the prices for goods and services are determined by the open market and consumers, in which the laws and forces of supply and demand are free from any intervention by a government, price-setting monopoly, or other authority. Proponents of the concept of free market contrast it with a regulated market, in which a government intervenes in supply and demand through various methods such as tariffs used to restrict trade and protect the economy. In an idealized free market economy, prices for goods and services are set freely by the forces of supply and demand and are allowed to reach their point of equilibrium without intervention by government policy. In scholarly debates, the concept of a free market is contrasted with the concept of a coordinated market in fields of study such as political economy, new institutional economics, economic sociology, and political science
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