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Biometric
Biometrics
Biometrics
is the technical term for body measurements and calculations. It refers to metrics related to human characteristics. Biometrics
Biometrics
authentication (or realistic authentication)[note 1] is used in computer science as a form of identification and access control.[1][2] It is also used to identify individuals in groups that are under surveillance. Biometric
Biometric
identifiers are the distinctive, measurable characteristics used to label and describe individuals.[3] Biometric
Biometric
identifiers are often categorized as physiological versus behavioral characteristics.[4] Physiological characteristics are related to the shape of the body. Examples include, but are not limited to fingerprint, palm veins, face recognition, DNA, palm print, hand geometry, iris recognition, retina and odour/scent
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Australia
Coordinates: 25°S 133°E / 25°S 133°E / -25; 133Commonwealth of AustraliaFlagCoat of armsAnthem: "Advance Australia
Australia
Fair"[N 1]Capital Canberra 35°18′29″S 149°07′28″E / 35.30806°S 149.12444°E / -35.30806; 149.12444Largest city SydneyNational language English[N 2]DemonymAustralian Aussie
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Telerobotics
Telerobotics
Telerobotics
is the area of robotics concerned with the control of semi-autonomous robots from a distance, chiefly using Wireless network (like Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, the Deep Space Network, and similar) or tethered connections. It is a combination of two major subfields, teleoperation and telepresence.Contents1 Teleoperation 2 Interfaces 3 Applications3.1 Space 3.2 Telepresence
Telepresence
and videoconferencing 3.3 Marine applications 3.4 Telemedicine 3.5 Other applications4 See also 5 References 6 External linksTeleoperation[edit] Teleoperation
Teleoperation
indicates operation of a machine at a distance. It is similar in meaning to the phrase "remote control" but is usually encountered in research, academic and technical environments
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Electrocardiography
Electrocardiography
Electrocardiography
(ECG or EKG[a]) is the process of recording the electrical activity of the heart over a period of time using electrodes placed on the skin. These electrodes detect the tiny electrical changes on the skin that arise from the heart muscle's electrophysiologic pattern of depolarizing and repolarizing during each heartbeat. It is a very commonly performed cardiology test. In a conventional 12-lead ECG, ten electrodes are placed on the patient's limbs and on the surface of the chest. The overall magnitude of the heart's electrical potential is then measured from twelve different angles ("leads") and is recorded over a period of time (usually ten seconds)
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Electroencephalography
Electroencephalography
Electroencephalography
(EEG) is an electrophysiological monitoring method to record electrical activity of the brain. It is typically noninvasive, with the electrodes placed along the scalp, although invasive electrodes are sometimes used such as in electrocorticography. EEG measures voltage fluctuations resulting from ionic current within the neurons of the brain.[1] In clinical contexts, EEG refers to the recording of the brain's spontaneous electrical activity over a period of time,[1] as recorded from multiple electrodes placed on the scalp. Diagnostic applications generally focus either on event-related potentials or on the spectral content of EEG. The former investigates potential fluctuations time locked to an event like stimulus onset or button press
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Hamming Distance
In information theory, the Hamming distance
Hamming distance
between two strings of equal length is the number of positions at which the corresponding symbols are different. In other words, it measures the minimum number of substitutions required to change one string into the other, or the minimum number of errors that could have transformed one string into the other
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Normalization (image Processing)
In image processing, normalization is a process that changes the range of pixel intensity values. Applications include photographs with poor contrast due to glare, for example. Normalization is sometimes called contrast stretching or histogram stretching. In more general fields of data processing, such as digital signal processing, it is referred to as dynamic range expansion.[1] The purpose of dynamic range expansion in the various applications is usually to bring the image, or other type of signal, into a range that is more familiar or normal to the senses, hence the term normalization. Often, the motivation is to achieve consistency in dynamic range for a set of data, signals, or images to avoid mental distraction or fatigue
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Artifact (error)
In natural science and signal processing, an artifact is any error in the perception or representation of any information, introduced by the involved equipment or technique(s).[1]Contents1 Computer science 2 Microscopy 3 Econometrics 4 Remote sensing4.1 Medical imaging 4.2 Medical electrophysiological monitoring 4.3 Radar5 See also 6 ReferencesComputer science[edit] In computer science, digital artifacts are anomalies introduced into digital signals as a result of digital processing. Microscopy[edit] In microscopy, artifacts are sometimes introduced during the processing of samples into slide form. See Artifact (microscopy) Econometrics[edit] In econometrics, which trades on computing relationships between related variables, an artifact is a spurious finding, such as one based on either a faulty choice of variables or an over extension of the computed relationship. Such an artifact may be called a statistical artifact
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Biology
Biology
Biology
is the natural science that involves the study of life and living organisms, including their physical structure, chemical composition, function, development and evolution.[1] Modern biology is a vast field, composed of many branches. Despite the broad scope and the complexity of the science, there are certain unifying concepts that consolidate it into a single, coherent field. Biology
Biology
recognizes the cell as the basic unit of life, genes as the basic unit of heredity, and evolution as the engine that propels the creation of new species. Living organisms are open systems that survive by transforming energy and decreasing their local entropy[2] to maintain a stable and vital condition defined as homeostasis
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Database
A database is an organized collection of data.[1] A relational database, more restrictively, is a collection of schemas, tables, queries, reports, views, and other elements. Database
Database
designers typically organize the data to model aspects of reality in a way that supports processes requiring information, such as (for example) modelling the availability of rooms in hotels in a way that supports finding a hotel with vacancies. A database-management system (DBMS) is a computer-software application that interacts with end-users, other applications, and the database itself to capture and analyze data
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Personal Identification Number
ATM[1] "PIN number" redirects here. For Indian postal codes, see Postal Index Number. [2]A personal identification number sent to its user in a letter
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John Michael McConnell
John Michael "Mike" McConnell (born July 26, 1943) is a former vice admiral in the United States
United States
Navy. During his naval career he served as Director of the National Security Agency
Director of the National Security Agency
from 1992 to 1996. His civilian career includes serving as the United States
United States
Director of National Intelligence from 20 February 2007 to 27 January 2009 during the Bush administration and seven days of the Obama administration
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Driver's License
A driver's license is an official document permitting a specific individual to operate one or more types of motorized vehicles, such as a motorcycle, car, truck, or bus on a public road. The term driver's license is American English; the Canadian English equivalent is driver's licence, and in British English
British English
it is driving licence. In this article, the American terminology and spelling is used except where the section refers specifically to British practice. The laws relating to the licensing of drivers vary between jurisdictions. In some jurisdictions, a license is issued after the recipient has passed a driving test, while in others, a person acquires a license before beginning to drive. Different categories of license often exist for different types of motor vehicles, particularly large trucks and passenger vehicles
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United States Director Of National Intelligence
The Director of National Intelligence
Director of National Intelligence
(DNI) is the United States government cabinet-level official—subject to the authority, direction, and control of the President—required by the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004 to:serve as head of the seventeen-member
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Booz Allen Hamilton
Booz Allen Hamilton
Booz Allen Hamilton
Inc. (/ˈbuːz ˈælən ˈhæməltən/,[3] informally: Booz Allen[4]) is an American management and information technology consulting firm, sometimes referred to as a government-services company,[5] headquartered in McLean, Virginia,[6] in Greater Washington, D.C., with 80 other offices around the globe.Contents1 History1.1 Beginnings 1.2 Organization 1.3 New South Wales, Australia 1.4 Internal Revenue Service 1.5 SWIFT 1.6 Homeland Security 1.7 National Institutes of Health 1.8 2011 Anonymous hack 1.9 PRISM media leak2 Political contributions 3 Activities in foreign countries 4 Employee demographics 5 Significant personnel and associates (past and present)5.1 Business 5.2 Government 5.3 Other6 See also 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksHistory[edit] Beginnings[edit] After graduating from Northwestern University
Northwestern University
in Evanston, Illinois in 1914,
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