HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Biology Letters
Biology
Biology
Letters is a peer-reviewed, biological, scientific journal published by the Royal Society. It focuses on the rapid publication of short high quality research articles, reviews and opinion pieces across the biological sciences. Biology
Biology
Letters has an average turnaround time of twenty four days from submission to a first decision. The Editor-in-Chief is Professor Rick Battarbee FRS (University College London[1]) who is supported by an international Editorial Board[2] of practising scientists.Contents1 Contents and themes 2 History 3 Indexing 4 External links 5 ReferencesContents and themes[edit] As well as the conventional, short research articles, Biology
Biology
Letters has recently published Special
Special
Features and Mini Series[3]
[...More...]

"Biology Letters" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

ISO 4
ISO 4 (Information and documentation – Rules for the abbreviation of title words and titles of publications) is an international standard which defines a uniform system for the abbreviation of serial titles, i.e., titles of publications such as scientific journals that are published in regular installments.[1] The ISSN
ISSN
International Centre, which the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO) has appointed as the registration authority for ISO 4, maintains the "List of Title Word Abbreviations" (LTWA), which contains standard abbreviations for words commonly found in serial titles. As of August 2017, the standard's most recent update came in 1997[2], when its third edition was released.[3] One major use of ISO 4 is to abbreviate the names of scientific journals using the List of Title Word Abbreviations (LTWA)
[...More...]

"ISO 4" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Scientific Journal
In academic publishing, a scientific journal is a periodical publication intended to further the progress of science, usually by reporting new research. Articles in scientific journals are mostly written by active scientists such as students, researchers and professors instead of professional journalists. There are thousands of scientific journals in publication, and many more have been published at various points in the past (see list of scientific journals). Most journals are highly specialized, although some of the oldest journals such as Nature publish articles and scientific papers across a wide range of scientific fields. Scientific journals contain articles that have been peer reviewed, in an attempt to ensure that articles meet the journal's standards of quality, and scientific validity. Although scientific journals are superficially similar to professional magazines, they are actually quite different
[...More...]

"Scientific Journal" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
[...More...]

"Digital Object Identifier" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Bombus Terrestris
Bombus
Bombus
terrestris, the buff-tailed bumblebee or large earth bumblebee, is one of the most numerous bumblebee species in Europe. It is one of the main species used in greenhouse pollination, and so can be found in many countries and areas where it is not native, such as Tasmania.[2] Moreover, it is a eusocial insect with an overlap of generations, a division of labor, and cooperative brood care. The queen is monandrous which means she mates with only one male
[...More...]

"Bombus Terrestris" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

The Times
The Times
The Times
is a British daily (Monday to Saturday) national newspaper based in London, England. It began in 1785 under the title The Daily Universal Register, adopting its current name on 1 January 1788. The Times and its sister paper The Sunday Times
The Sunday Times
(founded in 1821) are published by Times Newspapers, since 1981 a subsidiary of News UK, itself wholly owned by News Corp
[...More...]

"The Times" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

CNN
Cable News Network (CNN) is an American basic cable and satellite television news channel owned by the Turner Broadcasting
Turner Broadcasting
System, a division of Time Warner.[1] CNN
CNN
was founded in 1980 by American media proprietor Ted Turner
Ted Turner
as a 24-hour cable news channel.[2] Upon its launch, CNN
CNN
was the first television channel to provide 24-hour news coverage,[3] and was the first all-news television channel in the United States.[4] While the news channel has numerous affiliates, CNN
CNN
primarily broadcasts from the Time Warner
Time Warner
Center in New York City, and studios in Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C.
and Los Angeles. Its headquarters at the CNN Center in Atlanta
Atlanta
is only used for weekend programming. CNN
CNN
is sometimes referred to as CNN/U.S
[...More...]

"CNN" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

BBC News
BBC
BBC
News is an operational business division[1] of the British Broadcasting
Broadcasting
Corporation (BBC) responsible for the gathering and broadcasting of news and current affairs
[...More...]

"BBC News" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Editor-in-chief
An editor-in-chief, also known as lead editor, chief editor, managing or executive editor, is a publication's editorial leader who has final responsibility for its operations and policies.[1][2]Contents1 Description 2 References 3 Further reading 4 External linksDescription[edit] The editor-in-chief heads all departments of the organization and is held accountable for delegating tasks to staff members and managing them. The term is often used at newspapers, magazines, yearbooks, and television news programs. The editor-in-chief is commonly the link between the publisher or proprietor and the editorial stafplied to academic journals, where the editor-in-chief gives the ultimate decision whether a submitted manuscript will be published
[...More...]

"Editor-in-chief" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Outline Of Academic Disciplines
An academic discipline or field of study is a branch of knowledge that is taught and researched as part of higher education. A scholar's discipline is commonly defined by the university faculties and learned societies to which he or she belongs and the academic journals in which he or she publishes research. Disciplines vary between well-established ones that exist in almost all universities and have well-defined rosters of journals and conferences and nascent ones supported by only a few universities and publications
[...More...]

"Outline Of Academic Disciplines" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Peer Review
Peer review
Peer review
is the evaluation of work by one or more people of similar competence to the producers of the work (peers). It constitutes a form of self-regulation by qualified members of a profession within the relevant field. Peer review
Peer review
methods are employed to maintain standards of quality, improve performance, and provide credibility. In academia, scholarly peer review is often used to determine an academic paper's suitability for publication. Peer review
Peer review
can be categorized by the type of activity and by the field or profession in which the activity occurs, e.g., medical peer review.Contents1 Professional 2 Scholarly 3 Government policy 4 Medical 5 See also 6 ReferencesProfessional[edit] Professional peer review focuses on the performance of professionals, with a view to improving quality, upholding standards, or providing certification
[...More...]

"Peer Review" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

BBC Online
BBC
BBC
Online, formerly known as BBCi, is the BBC's online service. It is a large network of websites including such high-profile sites as BBC News and Sport, the on-demand video and radio services co-branded BBC iPlayer, the children's sites C BBC
BBC
and CBeebies, and learning services such as Bitesize
[...More...]

"BBC Online" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

International Standard Serial Number
An International Standard Serial Number
International Standard Serial Number
(ISSN) is an eight-digit serial number used to uniquely identify a serial publication.[1] The ISSN is especially helpful in distinguishing between serials with the same title. ISSN are used in ordering, cataloging, interlibrary loans, and other practices in connection with serial literature.[2] The ISSN system was first drafted as an International Organization for Standardization (ISO) international standard in 1971 and published as ISO 3297 in 1975.[3] ISO subcommittee TC 46/SC 9 is responsible for maintaining the standard. When a serial with the same content is published in more than one media type, a different ISSN is assigned to each media type. For example, many serials are published both in print and electronic media
[...More...]

"International Standard Serial Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Impact Factor
The impact factor (IF) or journal impact factor (JIF) of an academic journal is a measure reflecting the yearly average number of citations to recent articles published in that journal. It is frequently used as a proxy for the relative importance of a journal within its field; journals with higher impact factors are often deemed to be more important than those with lower ones. The impact factor was devised by Eugene Garfield, the founder of the Institute for Scientific Information
[...More...]

"Impact Factor" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Hybrid Open Access Journal
A hybrid open access journal is a subscription journal in which some of the articles are open access. This status typically requires the payment of a publication fee (also called an article processing charge or APC) to the publisher.Contents1 History 2 Funding 3 Advantages and disadvantages to the author 4 Variations 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] See also: Category:Hybrid open access journals The concept was first proposed in 1998 when Thomas Walker suggested that authors could purchase extra visibility at a price.[1] The first journal recognized as using this model was Walker's own Florida Journal of Entomology; it was later extended to the other publications of the Entomological Society of America. The idea was later refined by David Prosser in 2003[2] in the journal Learned Publishing. Publishers that offer a hybrid open access option often use different names for it
[...More...]

"Hybrid Open Access Journal" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Open Access Journal
Open access
Open access
(OA) journals are scholarly journals that are available online to the reader "without financial, legal, or technical barriers other than those inseparable from gaining access to the internet itself."[1] They remove price barriers (e.g. subscription, licensing fees, pay-per-view fees) and most permission barriers (e.g. copyright and licensing restrictions).[1] While open access journals are freely available to the reader, there are still costs associated with the publication and production of such journals. Some are subsidized, and some require payment on behalf of the author.[1] Some open access journals are subsidized and are financed by an academic institution, learned society or a government information center
[...More...]

"Open Access Journal" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.