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Billi Gordon
Wilbert Anthony Gordon Jr.[1] (September 2, 1954 – February 22, 2018), better known as Billi Gordon, was an American author, television writer, neuroscientist, actor and model,[2] Life and career[edit] Gordon was born in 1954 in Dowagiac, Michigan. After high school, in 1972, Gordon entered the Roman Catholic Crosier Seminary in Onamia, Minnesota, but left during his freshman year to attend the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor. In his junior year, he withdrew from the university and moved to Los Angeles. In L.A
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Neuroscientist
A neuroscientist (or neurobiologist) is a scientist who has specialised knowledge in the field of neuroscience, the branch of biology[1] that deals with the physiology, biochemistry, anatomy and molecular biology of neurons and neural circuits and especially their association with behaviour and learning.[2] Camillo Golgi
Camillo Golgi
(1843-1926), Italian physician, neuroscientist, and namesake of the Golgi apparatusNeuroscientists generally work as researchers within a college, university, government agency, or private industry setting.[3] In research-oriented careers, neuroscientists typically spend their time designing and carrying out scientific experiments that contribute to the understanding of the nervous system and its function. They can engage in basic or applied research
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Pathophysiology
Pathophysiology or physiopathology is a convergence of pathology with physiology. Pathology
Pathology
is the medical discipline that describes conditions typically observed during a disease state, whereas physiology is the biological discipline that describes processes or mechanisms operating within an organism. Pathology
Pathology
describes the abnormal or undesired condition, whereas pathophysiology seeks to explain the physiological processes or mechanisms whereby such condition develops and progresses. Pathophysiology can also mean the functional changes associated with or resulting from disease or injury
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Variety (magazine)
Variety is a weekly American entertainment trade magazine and website owned by Penske Media Corporation. It was founded by Sime Silverman in New York in 1905 as a weekly newspaper reporting on theater and vaudeville. In 1933 it added Daily Variety, based in Los Angeles, to cover the motion-picture industry
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Oakland Tribune
The Oakland Tribune
Oakland Tribune
was a daily newspaper published in Oakland, California, by the Bay Area News Group (BANG), a subsidiary of MediaNews Group
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MRI
Magnetic resonance imaging
Magnetic resonance imaging
is a medical imaging technique used in radiology to form pictures of the anatomy and the physiological processes of the body in both health and disease. MRI scanners use strong magnetic fields, electric field gradients, and radio waves to generate images of the organs in the body. MRI does not involve X-rays and the use of ionizing radiation, which distinguishes it from CT or CAT scans. Magnetic resonance imaging
Magnetic resonance imaging
is a medical application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). NMR can also be used for imaging in other NMR applications such as NMR spectroscopy. While the hazards of X-rays
X-rays
are now well-controlled in most medical contexts, MRI may still be seen as a better choice than CT. MRI is widely used in hospitals and clinics for medical diagnosis, staging of disease and follow-up without exposing the body to radiation
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Los Angeles Times
The Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Times is a daily newspaper which has been published in Los Angeles, California
Los Angeles, California
since 1881
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Neuroimaging
Neuroimaging
Neuroimaging
or brain imaging is the use of various techniques to either directly or indirectly image the structure, function/pharmacology of the nervous system. It is a relatively new discipline within medicine, neuroscience, and psychology.[1] Physicians who specialize in the performance and interpretation of neuroimaging in the clinical setting are neuroradiologists. Neuroimaging
Neuroimaging
falls into two broad categories:Structural imaging, which deals with the structure of the nervous system and the diagnosis of gross (large scale) intracranial disease (such as tumor) and injury. Functional imaging, which is used to diagnose metabolic diseases and lesions on a finer scale (such as Alzheimer's disease) and also for neurological and cognitive psychology research and building brain-computer interfaces.Functional imaging enables, for example, the processing of information by centers in the brain to be visualized directly
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University Of Michigan
The University of Michigan
Michigan
(UM, U-M, U of M, or UMich), often simply referred to as Michigan, is a public research university in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The University of Michigan
Michigan
is the state's oldest university, founded in 1817 in Detroit, Michigan
Michigan
as the Catholepistemiad, or University of Michigania, 20 years before the Michigan
Michigan
Territory became a state. It moved to Ann Arbor in 1837 onto 40 acres (16 ha) of what is now known as Central Campus. Since its establishment in Ann Arbor, the university campus has expanded to include more than 584 major buildings with a combined area of more than 34 million gross square feet (780 acres; 3.2 km2) spread out over a Central Campus and North Campus, two regional campuses in Flint and Dearborn, and a Center in Detroit
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227 (TV Series)
227 is an American sitcom that originally aired on NBC
NBC
from September 14, 1985 to May 6, 1990. The series stars Marla Gibbs
Marla Gibbs
as a sharp-tongued, inner-city resident gossip and housewife, Mary Jenkins.Contents1 Origins 2 Synopsis 3 Cast 4 Episodes 5 Ratings 6 Awards and nominations 7 Series syndication 8 DVD release 9 See also 10 References 11 External linksOrigins[edit] The series was adapted from a play written in 1978 by Christine Houston about the lives of women in a predominantly black apartment building in 1950s Chicago. The setting of the series, however, was changed to present-day Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C.
The show was created as a starring vehicle for Marla Gibbs, who had become famous as Florence Johnston, the sassy maid on The Jeffersons, and had starred in Houston's play in Los Angeles
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Women In Prison (TV Series)
Women in Prison is an American television sitcom created by Katherine Green which aired on Fox from October 11, 1987 to February 20, 1988.[1][2]Contents1 Synopsis 2 Cast 3 Episode list 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksSynopsis[edit] Set in cell-block J of the Bass Women's prison in Wisconsin, the show focuses on the interactions among the prison inmates. The show's cast include Peggy Cass, Julia Campbell, Antoinette Byron, Blake Clark, Denny Dillon, C. C. H. Pounder,[1] and Wendie Jo Sperber. Campbell stars as Vicki Springer, an overachieving yuppie, who was brought to Bass Women's Prison for supposedly shoplifting (she had been actually framed on the charge by her scheming no-good husband), where she had to deal with the inmates
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Coming To America
Coming to America
Coming to America
is a 1988 American romantic comedy film directed by John Landis
John Landis
and based on a story originally created by Eddie Murphy, who also starred in the lead role. The film also co-stars Arsenio Hall, James Earl Jones, Shari Headley, and John Amos. The film was released in the United States
United States
on June 29, 1988
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Saturday Review (US Magazine)
Saturday Review, previously The Saturday Review of Literature, was an American weekly magazine established in 1924. Norman Cousins
Norman Cousins
was the editor from 1940 to 1971.[1] At its peak, Saturday Review was influential as the base of several widely read critics (e.g., Wilder Hobson, music critic Irving Kolodin, and theater critics John Mason Brown and Henry Hewes), and was often known by its initials as SR. It was never very profitable and eventually succumbed to the decline of general-interest magazines after restructuring and trying to reinvent itself more than once during the 1970s and 1980s.Contents1 Publishing history 2 Current revival 3 References 4 External linksPublishing history[edit] From 1920 to 1924, Literary Review was a Saturday supplement to the New York Evening Post.[2] Henry Seidel Canby established it as a separate publication in 1924
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University Of Michigan At Ann Arbor
The University of Michigan
Michigan
(UM, U-M, U of M, or UMich), often simply referred to as Michigan, is a public research university in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The University of Michigan
Michigan
is the state's oldest university, founded in 1817 in Detroit, Michigan
Michigan
as the Catholepistemiad, or University of Michigania, 20 years before the Michigan
Michigan
Territory became a state. It moved to Ann Arbor in 1837 onto 40 acres (16 ha) of what is now known as Central Campus. Since its establishment in Ann Arbor, the university campus has expanded to include more than 584 major buildings with a combined area of more than 34 million gross square feet (780 acres; 3.2 km2) spread out over a Central Campus and North Campus, two regional campuses in Flint and Dearborn, and a Center in Detroit
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