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Big Ten Conference
The Big Ten Conference
Big Ten Conference
(B1G), formerly Western Conference and Big Nine Conference, is the oldest Division I collegiate athletic conference in the United States. Despite its name, the conference consists of 14 members (as of 2018). They compete in the NCAA
NCAA
Division I; its football teams compete in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS), formerly known as Division I-A, the highest level of NCAA
NCAA
competition in that sport. The conference includes the flagship public university in each of 11 states stretching from New Jersey
New Jersey
to Nebraska, as well as two additional public land grant schools and a private university. The Big Ten Conference
Big Ten Conference
was established in 1895 when Purdue University president James H
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Private University
Private universities are typically not operated by governments, although many receive tax breaks, public student loans, and grants. Depending on their location, private universities may be subject to government regulation. This is in contrast to public universities and national universities
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List Of NCAA Conferences
A conference is a meeting of people who "confer" about a topic. Conference
Conference
types include:Convention (meeting), meeting of a, usually large, group of individuals and/or companies in a certain field Academic conference, in science and academic, a formal event where researchers present results, workshops, and other activities. Athletic conference, a competitive grouping of teams, often geographical Authors' conference, or writers' conference, where writers gather to review their written works and suggest improvements
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Research Universities
A university (Latin: universitas, "a whole") is an institution of higher (or tertiary) education and research which awards academic degrees in various academic disciplines
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Consortium
A consortium is an association of two or more individuals, companies, organizations or governments (or any combination of these entities) with the objective of participating in a common activity or pooling their resources for achieving a common goal. Consortium
Consortium
is a Latin
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Lacrosse
Lacrosse
Lacrosse
is a team sport played with a lacrosse stick and a lacrosse ball. Players use the head of the lacrosse stick to carry, pass, catch, and shoot the ball into the goal. The sport has four versions that have different sticks, fields, rules and equipment: field lacrosse, women's lacrosse, box lacrosse and intercrosse. The men's games, field lacrosse (outdoor) and box lacrosse (indoor), are contact sports and all players wear protective gear: helmet, gloves, shoulder pads, and elbow pads. The women's game does not allow body contact but does allow stick to stick contact. The only protective gear required for women players is eyegear, while goalies wear helmets and protective pads
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University Of Illinois
The University of Illinois
Illinois
is a system of public universities in Illinois
Illinois
consisting of three universities: Chicago, Springfield, and Urbana–Champaign. Across its three universities, the University of Illinois
Illinois
System enrolls more than 80,000 students.[1] It had an operating budget of $5.6 billion in 2015.[1] Contents1 System1.1 Chicago 1.2 Springfield 1.3 Urbana–Champaign 1.4 Global Campus2 Foundation 3 Alumni Association 4 Further reading 5 References 6 External linksSystem[edit] The University of Illinois
Illinois
System of universities comprises three universities in the U.S. state of Illinois: Urbana–Champaign, Chicago, and Springfield
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Women's Lacrosse
Women's lacrosse
Women's lacrosse
(or girls' lacrosse), sometimes shortened to wlax or lax, is a sport played with twelve players on each team. Originally played by indigenous peoples of the Americas, the modern women's game was introduced in 1890 at the St Leonard's School
St Leonard's School
in St Andrews, Scotland. The rules of women's lacrosse differ significantly from men's field lacrosse. The object of the game is to use a long-handled stick (known as a crosse or lacrosse stick) to catch, cradle, and pass a solid yellow rubber lacrosse ball in an effort to score by hurling the ball into an opponent's goal. The head of the lacrosse stick has a mesh or leather net strung into it that allows the player to hold the ball. Defensively the object is to keep the opposing team from scoring and to dispossess them of the ball through the use of stick checking and body positioning
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Ice Hockey
Ice
Ice
hockey is a contact team sport played on ice, usually in a rink, in which two teams of skaters use their sticks to shoot a vulcanized rubber puck into their opponent's net to score points. The sport is known to be fast-paced and physical, with teams usually consisting of six players each: one goaltender, and five players who skate up and down the ice trying to take the puck and score a goal against the opposing team. Ice
Ice
hockey is most popular in Canada, central and eastern Europe, Nordic countries, Russia
Russia
and the United States
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Bloomington, Indiana
Bloomington is a city in and the county seat of Monroe County in the southern region of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Indiana.[6] It is the seventh-largest city in Indiana
Indiana
and the fourth-largest outside the Indianapolis
Indianapolis
metropolitan area. According to the Monroe County History Center, Bloomington is known as the "Gateway to Scenic Southern Indiana." The city was established in 1818 by a group of settlers from Kentucky, Tennessee, the Carolinas, and Virginia
Virginia
who were so impressed with "a haven of blooms" that they called it Bloomington.[7] The population was 80,405 at the 2010 census.[8] The city's population was estimated at 84,067 as of July 2016 by the U.S. Census Bureau.[9] Bloomington is the home to Indiana
Indiana
University Bloomington
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Public University
A public university is a university that is predominantly funded by public means through a national or subnational government, as opposed to private universities
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The Palmer House Hilton
The Palmer House Hilton is a historic hotel in Chicago in the city's Loop area. Currently operating as the Palmer House - A Hilton Hotel, it is a Historic Hotels of America member,[1] the official program of the National Trust for Historic Preservation. The Palmer House was the city's first hotel with elevators and the first hotel with electric light bulbs and telephones in the guest rooms. It has also been dubbed the longest continuously operating hotel in North America.Contents1 History1.1 First Palmer House 1.2 Second Palmer House 1.3 Third Palmer House2 See also 3 References 4 Further reading 5 External linksHistory[edit]Palmer House Hotel Ladies Entrance (19 September 1903)Three Palmer House hotels have been located at the corner of State and Monroe streets in Chicago. First Palmer House[edit]Stereoscopic view of the first Palmer HouseThe first (known as "The Palmer") was built as a wedding present from Potter Palmer to his bride Bertha Honoré
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College Park, Maryland
The City
City
of College Park is in Prince George's County, Maryland.[5] The population was 30,413 at the 2010 United States Census. It is best known as the home of the University of Maryland, College Park, and since 1994 the city has also been home to the National Archives at College Park, a facility of the U.S
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Mid-Atlantic States
The Mid-Atlantic, also called Middle Atlantic states or the Mid-Atlantic states, form a region of the United States generally located between New England and the South Atlantic States. Its exact definition differs upon source, but the region usually includes New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Washington, D.C., Virginia, and West Virginia.[3] The Mid-Atlantic has played an important role in the development of American culture, commerce, trade, and industry.[4] In the late 19th century, it was called "the typically American" region by Frederick Jackson Turner
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Northeastern United States
The Northeastern United States, also referred to as the American Northeast or simply the Northeast, is a geographical region of the United States
United States
bordered to the north by Canada, to the east by the Atlantic Ocean, to the south by the Southern United States, and to the west by the Midwestern United States
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West North Central States
The West North Central states form one of the nine geographic subdivisions within the United States that are officially recognized by the U.S. Census Bureau. Seven states compose the division: Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota and South Dakota, and it makes up the western half of the United States Census Bureau's larger region of the Midwest, the eastern half of which consists of the East North Central states of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio and Wisconsin
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