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Big Love
Big Love
Big Love
is an American television drama series that aired on HBO between March 2006 and March 2011. It stars Bill Paxton
Bill Paxton
as the patriarch of a fundamentalist Mormon family in contemporary Utah
Utah
who practices polygamy, with Jeanne Tripplehorn, Chloë Sevigny, and Ginnifer Goodwin
Ginnifer Goodwin
portraying his wives. The series charts the family's life in and out of the public sphere in their Salt Lake City
Salt Lake City
suburb, as well as their associations with a fundamentalist compound in the area
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Kingston Clan
The Latter Day Church of Christ[2] is a Mormon fundamentalist denomination in the Latter Day Saint movement. Also known as the Kingston Clan or the Kingston Group, it is a part of The Order, or the Davis County Cooperative, and The Co-op Society.[3] There are approximately 3,500 members of this group.[4]Contents1 Establishment 2 Finances 3 Beliefs 4 Controversies4.1 Intra-family marriages 4.2 Child marriage 4.3 Financial fraud5 Leaders 6 Kingston Group assets 7 See also 8 ReferencesEstablishment[edit] The church was created in 1978 by Ortell Kingston, the then leader of the Davis County Cooperative Society Inc.,[5][verification needed] a cooperative organized as a United Order on January 1, 1935 and incorporated in 1941 as a legal cooperative.[6] The Latter Day Church of Christ is based in Salt Lake City, Utah. In 1926, Charles W
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Law And Contemporary Problems
Law and Contemporary Problems is a quarterly, interdisciplinary, faculty-edited publication of Duke University School of Law. Unlike traditional law reviews, L&CP uses a symposium format, generally publishing one symposium per issue on a topic of contemporary concern. L&CP hosts an annual conference at Duke Law School featuring the authors of one of the year’s four symposia.[1] Established in 1933, L&CP is the oldest journal published at Duke University School of Law. References[edit]^ "About Us – Law and Contemporary Problems". Duke University School of Law. External links[edit]ISSN 0023-9186 ISSN 1945-2322This Duke University-related article is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t eThis law school related article is a stub
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The Beach Boys
The Beach
Beach
Boys are an American rock band formed in Hawthorne, California, in 1961. The group's original lineup consisted of brothers Brian, Dennis, and Carl Wilson; their cousin Mike Love; and their friend Al Jardine
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Warner Bros. Television
Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
Television (WBTV) is the television production arm of Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
Entertainment, itself part of Time Warner. Alongside CBS Television Studios, it serves as a television production arm of The CW (in which Time Warner
Time Warner
has a 50% ownership stake), though it also produces shows for other networks, such as Shameless on Showtime, Westworld on HBO
HBO
(though Time Warner
Time Warner
also owns HBO)
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Utah
Utah
Utah
(/ˈjuːtɔː/ YOO-taw, /-tɑː/ -tah  listen) is a state in the western United States. It became the 45th state admitted to the U.S. on January 4, 1896. Utah
Utah
is the 13th-largest by area, 31st-most-populous, and 10th-least-densely populated of the 50 United States. Utah
Utah
has a population of more than 3 million (Census estimate for July 1, 2016)
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Polygamy
Polygamy
Polygamy
(from Late Greek πολυγαμία, polygamía, "state of marriage to many spouses")[1][2][3][4] is the practice of marrying multiple spouses. When a man is married to more than one wife at a time, sociologists call this polygyny. When a woman is married to more than one husband at a time, it is called polyandry. If a marriage includes multiple husbands and wives, it can be called a group marriage. In contrast, monogamy is marriage consisting of only two parties. Like "monogamy", the term "polygamy" is often used in a de facto sense, applied regardless of whether the state recognises the relationship.[n 1] In sociobiology and zoology, researchers use polygamy in a broad sense to mean any form of multiple mating. Worldwide, different societies variously encourage, accept or outlaw polygamy. Of societies which allow or tolerate polygamy, in the vast majority of cases the form accepted in polygyny
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Salt Lake City
Salt Lake City
Salt Lake City
(often shortened to Salt Lake and abbreviated as SLC) is the capital and the most populous municipality of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Utah. With an estimated population of 190,884 in 2014,[7] the city is the core of the Salt Lake City
Salt Lake City
metropolitan area, which has a population of 1,153,340 (2014 estimate). Salt Lake City
Salt Lake City
is further situated within a larger metropolis known as the Salt Lake City–Ogden–Provo Combined Statistical Area
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Writers Guild Of America Award For Television
Television
Television
(TV) is a telecommunication medium used for transmitting moving images in monochrome (black and white), or in colour, and in two or three dimensions and sound. The term can refer to a television set, a television program ("TV show"), or the medium of television transmission. Television
Television
is a mass medium for advertising, entertainment and news. Television
Television
became available in crude experimental forms in the late 1920s, but it would still be several years before the new technology would be marketed to consumers. After World War II, an improved form of black-and-white TV broadcasting became popular in the United States and Britain, and television sets became commonplace in homes, businesses, and institutions
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Columbia Law Review
The Columbia Law Review is a law review edited and published by students at Columbia Law School. The journal publishes scholarly articles, essays, and student notes. It was established in 1901 by Joseph E. Corrigan and John M. Woolsey, who served as the review's first editor-in-chief and secretary. The Columbia Law Review is one of four law reviews that publishes the Bluebook.Contents1 Impact 2 Notable alumni 3 Past Editors-in-Chief 4 Notable articles 5 References 6 External linksImpact[edit] The Columbia Law Review ranked second for submissions and citations within the legal academic community, after the Harvard Law Review.[3] According to the Journal Citation Reports it has a 2009 impact factor of 3.610, ranking it third out of 116 journals in the category "Law".[4] Notable alumni[edit] Alumni of the Columbia Law Review include:United States Supreme Court JusticesWilliam O
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Intertitle
In films, an intertitle (also known as a title card) is a piece of filmed, printed text edited into the midst of (i.e. inter-) the photographed action at various points. Intertitles used to convey character dialogue are referred to as "dialogue intertitles", and those used to provide related descriptive/narrative material are referred to as "expository intertitles".[1] In modern usage, the terms refer to similar text and logo material inserted at or near the start of films and television shows.Contents1 Silent film
Silent film
era 2 Modern use 3 Amateur use 4 See also 5 References Silent film
Silent film
era[edit] In this era intertitles were always called "subtitles."[2][3] They were a mainstay of silent films once the films became of sufficient length and detail to necessitate dialogue and/or narration to make sense of the enacted or documented events
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Hildale, Utah
Hildale is a city in Washington County, Utah, United States. The population was 2,726 at the 2010 census. Hildale is a twin city to the better-known Colorado City, Arizona, which together straddle the border between Utah and Arizona. Hildale is the headquarters of the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (FLDS). Many adults in the community practice plural marriage. The United Effort Plan, the financial arm of the FLDS, owns most of the property in the city
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Executive Producer
Executive producer (EP) is one of the top positions in the making of a commercial entertainment product. Depending on the medium, the executive producer may be concerned with management accounting or with associated legal issues (like copyrights or royalties).[1] In films, the executive producer generally contributes to the film's budget and usually does not work on set, in contrast to most other producers.[2]Contents1 Motion pictures 2 Television 3 Music 4 Video games 5 Radio 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksMotion pictures[edit] Main article: Film producer In films, an executive producer finances the film or participates in the creative effort, but does not work on the set. His/her responsibilities vary from funding or attracting investors into the movie project to legal, scripting, marketing, advisory and supervising capacities.[3] The crediting of executive producers in the film industry has risen over time
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Colorado City, Arizona
Colorado City is a town in Mohave County, Arizona, United States, and is located in a region known as the Arizona Strip. According to the 2010 census, the population of the town was 4,821.[2] At least three Mormon fundamentalist sects are said to have been based there.[4]Contents1 History 2 Geography and climate 3 Demographics 4 Government and infrastructure 5 Education 6 Notable people 7 Twin city 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit] Colorado City, formerly known as Short Creek (or the Short Creek Community), was founded in 1913[5] by members of the Council of Friends, a breakaway group from the Salt Lake City-based The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church)
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Arizona
As of 2010English 74.1% Spanish 19.5% Navajo 1.9% Other 4.5 %Demonym Arizonan[1]Capital PhoenixLargest city PhoenixLargest metro Phoenix metropolitan areaArea Ranked 6th • Total 113,990[2] sq mi (295,234 km2) • Width 310 miles (500 km) • Length 400 miles (645 km) • % water 0.35 • Latitude 31°  20′ N to 37° N • Longitude 109°  03′ W to 114°  49′ WPopulation Ranked 14th • Total 6,931,071 (2016 est.)[3] • Density 57/sq mi  (22/km2) Ranked 33rd • Median household income $52,248 [4] (33rd)Elevation • Highest point Humphreys Peak[5][6][7] 12,637 ft (3852 m) • Mean 4,100 ft  (1250 m) • Lowest point
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Short Creek Raid
Latter Day Saints portal  Bookv t eThe Short Creek raid
Short Creek raid
is the name given to the Arizona Department of Public Safety and Arizona National Guard
Arizona National Guard
action against Mormon fundamentalists that took place on the morning of July 26, 1953, at Short Creek, Arizona. The Short Creek raid
Short Creek raid
was the largest mass arrest of polygamists in American history. At the time, it was described as "the largest mass arrest of men and women in modern American history."[1]Contents1 Events 2 Public and media reaction 3 Support from LDS Church 4 Aftermath 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksEvents[edit] Just before dawn on July 26, 1953, 102 Arizona officers of public safety and soldiers from the Arizona National Guard
Arizona National Guard
entered Short Creek
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