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Big Band
A big band is a type of musical ensemble that usually consists of ten or more musicians with four sections: saxophones, trumpets, trombones, and a rhythm section. Big bands originated during the early 1910s and dominated jazz in the early 1940s when swing was most popular. The term "big band" is also used to describe a genre of music. One problem with this usage is that it overlooks the variety of music played by these bands. Big bands started as accompaniment for dancing. In contrast with the emphasis on improvisation, big bands relied on written compositions and arrangements
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Big Band (Joe Henderson Album)
Big Band is a 1997 album by jazz saxophonist Joe Henderson, the fourth of the five albums he recorded with Verve Records
Verve Records
during the end of his career. Track listing[edit] All tracks are composed by Joe Henderson, except where noted."Without a Song" (Vincent Youmans) – 5:24 "Isotope" – 5:20 "Inner Urge" – 9:01 "Black Narcissus" – 6:53 "A Shade Of Jade" – 8:22 "Step Lightly" – 7:19 "Serenity" – 5:52 "Chelsea Bridge" (Billy Strayhorn) – 4:30 "Recordame (Recuerdame)" – 7:25Personnel[edit]
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Lindy Hop
The Lindy hop is an American dance which was born in Harlem, New York City in 1928 and has evolved since then with the jazz music of that time. It was very popular during the Swing era of the late 1930s and early 1940s. Lindy was a fusion of many dances that preceded it or were popular during its development but is mainly based on jazz, tap, breakaway, and Charleston. It is frequently described as a jazz dance and is a member of the swing dance family. In its development, the Lindy hop combined elements of both partnered and solo dancing by using the movements and improvisation of African-American dances along with the formal eight-count structure of European partner dances – most clearly illustrated in the Lindy's basic step, the swingout
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Pride Park Stadium
Pride Park
Pride Park
Stadium, commonly known as Pride Park, is an all-seater football stadium in Derby, England, that is the home ground of English Football League club Derby
Derby
County. With a capacity of 33,597, it is the 16th-largest football ground in England and the 20th-largest stadium in the United Kingdom. Located on Pride Park, a business park on the outskirts of Derby
Derby
city centre, the stadium was built as part of the commercial redevelopment of the area in the 1990s. Derby
Derby
County have played at the ground since it opened in 1997 as a replacement for their former home, the Baseball Ground. Due to sponsorship, the venue was officially known as the iPro Stadium
Stadium
between 2013 and 2016. Pride Park
Pride Park
has hosted two full international matches, England vs. Mexico in 2001 and Brazil vs
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Strophic Form
Strophic form, also called verse-repeating or chorus form, is the term applied to songs in which all verses or stanzas of the text are sung to the same music.[1] The opposite of strophic form, with new music written for every stanza, is called through-composed.[1]Das Wandern, the opening song in Franz Schubert's song cycle Die schöne Müllerin, is a classic example of a strophic song.The term is derived from the Greek word στροφή, strophē, meaning "turn". It is the simplest and most durable of musical forms, extending a piece of music by repetition of a single formal section. This may be analyzed as "A A A..."
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Twelve Bar Blues
The twelve-bar blues or blues changes is one of the most prominent chord progressions in popular music. The blues progression has a distinctive form in lyrics, phrase, chord structure, and duration. In its basic form, it is predominantly based on the I, IV, and V chords of a key. The blues can be played in any key. Mastery of the blues and rhythm changes are "critical elements for building a jazz repertoire".[1]Contents1 Structure1.1 Variations2 Lyrical patterns 3 Notes 4 References 5 Sources 6 Further reading 7 External linksStructure[edit]The most common or standard twelve-bar blues progressions variations, in C. (Benward & Saker, 2003, p. 186)  Play A (help·info),  B (help·info),  C (help·info),  D (help·info), and  E (help·info) as boogie woogie basslines
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Thirty-two-bar Form
The thirty-two-bar form, also known as the AABA song form, American popular song form and the ballad form, is a song structure commonly found in Tin Pan Alley
Tin Pan Alley
songs and other American popular music, especially in the first half of the 20th century.[2] As its alternate name AABA implies, this song form consists of four sections: an eight-bar A section; a second eight-bar A section (which may have slight changes from the first A section); an eight-bar B section, often with contrasting harmony or "feel"; and a final eight-bar A section
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Shout Chorus
A refrain (from Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
refringere, "to repeat", and later from Old French
Old French
refraindre) is the line or lines that are repeated in music or in verse; the "chorus" of a song. Poetic fixed forms that feature refrains include the villanelle, the virelay, and the sestina. The use of refrains is particularly associated with where the verse-chorus-verse song structure typically places a refrain in almost every song
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Waltz
The waltz (from German Walzer [ˈvalt͡sɐ̯]) is a ballroom and folk dance, normally in  triple (help·info) time, performed primarily in closed position.Contents1 History 2 Variants 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit]Play mediaWaltzThere are several references to a sliding or gliding dance that would evolve into the waltz that dates from 16th century Europe, including the representations of the printmaker Hans Sebald Beham
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Polka
The polka is originally a Czech dance and genre of dance music familiar throughout Europe and the Americas. It originated in the middle of the 19th century in Bohemia, now part of the Czech Republic. Polka
Polka
remains a popular folk music genre in many European countries, and is performed by folk artists in the Czech Republic, Poland, Germany, Austria, Slovenia, Switzerland, and to a lesser extent in Latvia, Lithuania, the Netherlands, Hungary, Italy, Ukraine, Romania, Belarus, Russia, and Slovakia
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Jitterbug
The jitterbug is a kind of dance popularized in the United States in the early 20th century and is associated with various types of swing dances such as the Lindy Hop,[1] jive, and East Coast Swing.Contents1 Origin 2 Early history 3 Popularity 4 See also 5 ReferencesOrigin[edit]Jitterbugging at a juke joint, 1939
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Vernon And Irene Castle
Vernon and Irene Castle
Vernon and Irene Castle
were a husband-and-wife team of ballroom dancers and dance teachers who appeared on Broadway and in silent films early in the early 20th century. They are credited with reviving the popularity of modern dancing. Castle was a stage name: Vernon (2 May 1887 – 15 February 1918) was born William Vernon Blyth in Norwich, Norfolk, England. Irene (17 April 1893 – 25 January 1969) was born Irene Foote in New Rochelle, New York. The couple reached the peak of their popularity in Irving Berlin's first Broadway show, Watch Your Step (1914), in which they refined and popularized the Foxtrot. They also helped to promote ragtime, jazz rhythms and African-American music
African-American music
for dance
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French Horn
Plucked Appalachian dulcimer
Appalachian dulcimer
(United States) Autoharp Baglama
Baglama
or Saz (Turkey)
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James Reese Europe
James Reese Europe
James Reese Europe
(February 22, 1880 – May 9, 1919), sometimes known as Jim Europe, was an American ragtime and early jazz bandleader, arranger, and composer. He was the leading figure on the African-American
African-American
music scene of New York City in the 1910s. Eubie Blake called him the " Martin Luther King
Martin Luther King
of music".[1]Contents1 Early life 2 Band leader 3 Military service 4 Post-war career 5 Death 6 See also 7 Footnotes 8 Bibliography 9 Further reading 10 External linksEarly life[edit] Europe was born in Mobile, Alabama, to Henry and Laura Europe. His family, which included his older sisters Minnie and Ida, and older brother John, moved to Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C.
in 1890, when he was 10 years old
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Ferde Grofé
Ferde Grofé
Ferde Grofé
(pronounced Ferdy GrowFay) (27 March 1892 – 3 April 1972) was an American composer, arranger, pianist and instrumentalist. During the 1920s and 1930s, he went by the name Ferdie Grofé.[1]Contents1 Early life 2 Musical education 3 Arranger for Paul Whiteman 4 Radio, tv, conducting and teaching 5 Grofé's compositions 6 Films 7 Personal life 8 Compositions 9 Selected discography 10 See also 11 References 12 Sources 13 External linksEarly life[edit] Born Ferdinand Rudolph von Grofé, in New York City, Grofé came by his extensive musical interests naturally. His family had four generations of classical musicians. His father, Emil von Grofé, was a baritone who sang mainly light opera; his mother, Elsa Johanna Bierlich von Grofé, a professional cellist, was also a versatile music teacher who taught Ferde to play the violin and piano
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Jelly Roll Morton
Ferdinand Joseph LaMothe (October 20, 1890 – July 10, 1941),[1] known professionally as Jelly Roll Morton, was an American ragtime and early jazz pianist, bandleader and composer who started his career in New Orleans, Louisiana. Widely recognized as a pivotal figure in early jazz, Morton is perhaps most notable as jazz's first arranger, proving that a genre rooted in improvisation could retain its essential spirit and characteristics when notated.[2] His composition "Jelly Roll Blues", published in 1915, was the first published jazz composition
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